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2020 United States presidential election in California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States presidential election in California

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
Turnout80.67% (of registered voters) Increase 5.40 pp
70.88% (of eligible voters) Increase 12.14 pp[1]
 
Joe Biden presidential portrait (cropped).jpg
Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Nominee Joe Biden Donald Trump
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Delaware Florida
Running mate Kamala Harris Mike Pence
Electoral vote 55 0
Popular vote 11,110,250 6,006,429
Percentage 63.48% 34.32%

California Presidential Election Results 2020.svg
County results

President before election

Donald Trump
Republican

Elected President

Joe Biden
Democratic

The 2020 United States presidential election in California was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated.[2] California voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote, pitting the Republican Party's nominee, incumbent President Donald Trump, and running mate Vice President Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his running mate Kamala Harris, the junior senator from California. California has 55 electoral votes in the Electoral College, the most of any state.[3] Prior to the election, all 14 news organizations considered California a strongly Democratic state, or a safe blue state. It has voted Democratic in every presidential election from 1992 onward. California was one of six states where Trump received more percentage of the two-party vote than he did in 2016.[a]

Biden carried California with 63.5% of the vote and a margin of 29.2% over Trump. Biden earned the highest percentage of the vote in the state for any candidate since Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936. Biden's margin of victory was slightly smaller than Hillary Clinton's 30.1% in 2016. Biden became the first candidate in any race for any office in U.S. history to win more than 10 million votes in a single state, while Trump also received the most votes a Republican has ever received in any state in any race since the country's founding, even narrowly besting his vote total in Texas, a state that he won.[4] Biden's vote margin was the largest vote margin for a presidential candidate in a singular state.

Per exit polls by the Associated Press, Biden's strength in the state came from a coalition of key Democratic-leaning constituencies, garnering 68% with voters with college degrees;[5] 74% of voters under the age of 30;[5] 93% with Blacks; 69% with Latinos, including 71% of Latinos of Mexican heritage; 73% with Asians; 67% of union households; and 56% of Whites. California legalized marijuana for recreational use under Proposition 64 in 2016, and 67% of voters favored legalizing the recreational use of marijuana nationwide, breaking for Biden by 75%–22%. Sixty percent of voters approved of Harris.[6] This became only the fourth presidential election in over 100 years where over 70% of California's eligible electorate cast their vote.

Biden flipped Butte County and Inyo County into the Democratic column, which had not voted Democrat since 2008 and 1964, respectively. In contrast, while he improved his total vote share by nearly three percentage points, Trump did not flip any counties that his then-Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton had won in 2016. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla certified the results on December 4, and took Harris' seat in the Senate upon her resignation to become Vice President.[7]

Primary elections

In a departure from previous election cycles, California held its primaries on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020.[8] Early voting began several weeks earlier.

Donald Trump secured the Republican nomination on March 17, 2020, defeating several longshot candidates, most notably former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld. Kamala Harris, the state's junior U.S. senator, was among the Democratic candidates declared until she dropped out on December 3, 2019. Representative Eric Swalwell from the 15th district was also a Democratic candidate but dropped out of the race on July 8, 2019. Other prominent state figures, including former Governor Jerry Brown, current Governor Gavin Newsom, and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti declined to run.[9][10][11]

Republican primary

The Republican Party's primary campaign was dominated by a lawsuit over the President's taxes.[12] The suit alleges that the new requirement for several years of a candidate's taxes was unconstitutional and onerous. The law was blocked in September 2019 while State Supreme court heard testimony and made a ruling.[13]

As a contingency, the Republican state committee changed its delegate selection process, turning the primary into a mere "beauty contest" and setting up an emergency state convention to Trump's delegate choices.[14] If Trump were allowed on the ballot, the convention would be canceled and the so-called "winner-take-most" rules, which require a challenger to get 20% of the vote, would apply.

President Trump was allowed on the ballot, and the contingency convention was canceled.

2020 California Republican presidential primary[15]
Candidate Votes % Estimated
delegates
Donald Trump 2,279,120 92.2% 172
Bill Weld 66,904 2.7%
Joe Walsh (withdrawn) 64,749 2.6%
Rocky De La Fuente 24,351 1.0%
Matthew John Matern 15,469 0.6%
Robert Ardini 12,857 0.5%
Zoltan Istvan 8,141 0.3%
Total 2,471,591 100%

Democratic primary

Candidates began filing their paperwork on November 4, 2019, and the final list was announced on December 9.

Leading California Democrats complained that Joe Biden and Senator Elizabeth Warren were snubbing the state by refusing to attend a forum at the State's "endorsement convention".[16] Early voting began on February 11 and ended the day before primary day.

Popular vote share by county  Map legend   Biden—<30%   Biden—30–40%   Sanders—<30%   Sanders—30–40%   Sanders—40–50%   Sanders—50–60%
Popular vote share by county
Map legend
  •   Biden—<30%
  •   Biden—30–40%
  •   Sanders—<30%
  •   Sanders—30–40%
  •   Sanders—40–50%
  •   Sanders—50–60%
Bernie Sanders rally at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
Bernie Sanders rally at the Los Angeles Convention Center.
Senator Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in San Jose on March 1, 2020.
Senator Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in San Jose on March 1, 2020.
Joe Biden's presidential campaign in Bel Air, Los Angeles, on March 5, 2020.
Joe Biden's presidential campaign in Bel Air, Los Angeles, on March 5, 2020.
2020 California Democratic presidential primary[17][18]
Candidate Votes % Delegates
Bernie Sanders 2,080,846 35.97 225
Joe Biden 1,613,854 27.90 172
Elizabeth Warren 762,555 13.18 11
Michael Bloomberg 701,803 12.13 7
Pete Buttigieg (withdrawn)[b] 249,256 4.31 0
Amy Klobuchar (withdrawn)[b] 126,961 2.19 0
Tom Steyer (withdrawn)[b] 113,092 1.96 0
Andrew Yang (withdrawn) 43,571 0.75 0
Tulsi Gabbard 33,769 0.58 0
Julian Castro (withdrawn) 13,892 0.24 0
Michael Bennet (withdrawn) 7,377 0.13 0
Marianne Williamson (withdrawn) 7,052 0.12 0
Rocky De La Fuente 6,151 0.11 0
Cory Booker (withdrawn) 6,000 0.10 0
John Delaney (withdrawn) 4,606 0.08 0
Michael Ellinger 3,424 0.06 0
Joe Sestak (withdrawn) 3,270 0.06 0
Mark Greenstein 3,190 0.06 0
Deval Patrick (withdrawn) 2,022 0.03 0
Mosie Boyd 1,639 0.03 0
Robert Jordan (write-in) 20 0.00 0
Daphne Bradford (write-in) 8 0.00 0
Nakia Anthony (write-in) 3 0.00 0
Willie Carter (write-in) 3 0.00 0
Michael Dename (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Jeffrey Drobman (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Heather Stagg (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Total votes 5,784,364 100% 415
Votes (percentage) and delegates by district[17][19][20]
District Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Michael Bloomberg Elizabeth Warren Total delegates
1st 34% 2 23.7% 2 10.3% 0 12.9% 0 4
2nd 33.3% 3 25.3% 2 13.5% 0 15.9% 1 6
3rd 34.3% 3 29.3% 2 12% 0 12% 0 5
4th 26.1% 2 29.6% 3 14.7% 0 11.4% 0 5
5th 32.7% 3 27.2% 3 14.9% 0 12.6% 0 6
6th 35.8% 3 28.1% 2 10.7% 0 14.3% 0 5
7th 30.9% 2 31.4% 3 13% 0 11.2% 0 5
8th 35.7% 2 31.2% 2 11.8% 0 8.8% 0 4
9th 32.9% 2 32.5% 2 15.9% 1 7% 0 5
10th 35.5% 2 29.1% 1 15.3% 1 7.2% 0 4
11th 29% 2 30.7% 3 15.3% 1 14.7% 0 6
12th 33.8% 3 23.9% 2 11% 0 23.4% 2 7
13th 38.7% 3 22.4% 2 8.1% 0 24.7% 2 7
14th 31.9% 3 26.4% 2 15.6% 1 14.8% 0 6
15th 34.1% 3 29.5% 3 14.4% 0 11.5% 0 6
16th 40.9% 3 26.2% 1 12.6% 0 7.2% 0 4
17th 36.1% 3 25.9% 2 14.3% 0 12.5% 0 5
18th 26.6% 2 29% 2 15.4% 1 17.1% 1 6
19th 38.9% 4 25.9% 2 13.6% 0 10.7% 0 6
20th 39.8% 3 25.5% 2 10.9% 0 13% 0 5
21st 43.2% 3 25.3% 1 13.7% 0 5.1% 0 4
22nd 34.4% 2 29.1% 2 13% 0 8.8% 0 4
23rd 34.9% 2 30.2% 2 12.2% 0 9% 0 4
24th 35.3% 3 26.8% 2 10.5% 0 14.7% 0 5
25th 35.6% 3 33.6% 2 10% 0 10% 0 5
26th 34.4% 3 31.1% 2 12.1% 0 11.5% 0 5
27th 35.9% 2 29.2% 2 10.2% 0 15.7% 1 5
28th 40% 3 22.7% 2 7.5% 0 21.7% 1 6
29th 49.8% 3 21.5% 2 7.7% 0 11.2% 0 5
30th 32.6% 3 31.2% 2 11.2% 0 15.4% 1 6
31st 39.1% 3 32.3% 2 11% 0 8.3% 0 5
32nd 44.7% 3 28.2% 2 10.5% 0 7.5% 0 5
33rd 26.2% 2 34.2% 3 14.3% 0 16.1% 1 6
34th 53.7% 4 16.8% 1 8.1% 0 14.7% 0 5
35th 46.6% 2 28.2% 2 10.9% 0 6.2% 0 4
36th 27.5% 1 29.8% 2 15.4% 1 8.1% 0 4
37th 35.6% 3 31.3% 2 10.1% 0 16.2% 1 6
38th 41.7% 3 30.8% 2 10.5% 0 7.6% 0 5
39th 36.7% 3 30.5% 2 12.6% 0 9.6% 0 5
40th 56.4% 4 20.9% 1 8.9% 0 5.4% 0 5
41st 45% 3 27.9% 2 10.7% 0 7.5% 0 5
42nd 37% 3 31.6% 2 12.4% 0 7.9% 0 5
43rd 36.5% 3 34.3% 2 10% 0 10.3% 0 5
44th 44% 3 29.6% 2 6.2% 0 9.6% 0 5
45th 34% 3 29.1% 2 13.5% 0 12% 0 5
46th 53.7% 2 20% 2 10.5% 0 7.7% 0 4
47th 38.5% 3 27.3% 2 10.6% 0 12.2% 0 5
48th 30.4% 2 30.3% 2 16.3% 1 11% 0 5
49th 30.6% 3 30.5% 2 14.6% 0 12.2% 0 5
50th 34.9% 2 27.6% 2 13% 0 11.3% 0 4
51st 49.2% 3 23.7% 2 11.3% 0 6.8% 0 5
52nd 30.6% 3 30% 3 13.4% 0 14.6% 0 6
53rd 37.8% 3 27.3% 3 10.1% 0 14.5% 0 6
Total 36.0% 144 27.9% 109 12.1% 7 13.2% 11 271
Pledged delegates[19]
Delegate type Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Michael Bloomberg Elizabeth Warren
At-large 51 39 0 0
PLEO 30 24 0 0
District-level 144 109 7 11
Total 225 172 7 11

Libertarian primary

2020 California Libertarian presidential primary

← 2016 March 3, 2020 2024 →
← MN
MA →
 
Jacob Hornberger by Gage Skidmore (cropped) (3).jpg
Ken Armstrong POTUS46 Headshot (cropped).jpg
Vermin Supreme August 2019 (cropped).jpg
Candidate Jacob Hornberger Ken Armstrong Vermin Supreme
Home state Virginia Oregon Massachusetts
Popular vote 2,898 1,921 1,921
Percentage 17.5% 11.6% 11.6%

 
Jo Jorgensen by Gage Skidmore 3 (50448627641) (crop 2).jpg
Kim Ruff (50280804772) (cropped).jpg
Kokesh2013 (cropped).jpg
Candidate Jo Jorgensen Kim Ruff
(withdrawn)
Adam Kokesh
Home state South Carolina Arizona Indiana
Popular vote 1,896 1,459 1,302
Percentage 11.4% 8.8% 7.9%

 
Dan-taxation-is-theft-behrman (cropped) (2).jpg
Sam Robb Campaign Photo for 2020 Election (cropped).jpg
Max suit small (cropped).jpg
Candidate Dan Behrman Sam Robb Max Abramson
Home state Nevada Pennsylvania New Hampshire
Popular vote 1,039 993 970
Percentage 6.3% 6.0% 5.9%

The Libertarian Party of California permitted non-affiliated voters to vote in their presidential primary.[21]

2020 California Libertarian primary[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Jacob Hornberger 2,898 17.5
Libertarian Ken Armstrong 1,921 11.6
Libertarian Vermin Supreme 1,921 11.6
Libertarian Jo Jorgensen 1,896 11.4
Libertarian Kim Ruff (withdrawn) 1,459 8.8
Libertarian Adam Kokesh 1,302 7.9
Libertarian Dan "Taxation is Theft" Behrman 1,039 6.3
Libertarian Sam Robb 993 6.0
Libertarian Max Abramson 970 5.9
Libertarian Steve Richey 649 3.9
Libertarian Souraya Faas 590 3.6
Libertarian Erik Gerhardt 486 2.9
Libertarian Keenan Wallace Dunham 440 2.7
Total votes 16,564 100%

Green primary

2020 California Green primary[23]
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
Howie Hawkins 4,202 36.2% 16 estimated
Dario Hunter 2,558 22.0% 9 estimated
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry 2,071 17.8% 8 estimated
Dennis Lambert 1,999 17.2% 7 estimated
David Rolde 774 6.7% 3 estimated
Total 9,656 100.00% 43

American Independent primary

The American Independent Party permitted non-affiliated voters to vote in their presidential primary.[21]

2020 California American Independent primary[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
American Independent Phil Collins 11,532 32.8
American Independent Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente 7,263 21.0
American Independent Don Blankenship 6,913 19.7
American Independent J. R. Myers 5,099 14.5
American Independent Charles Kraut 4,216 12.0
Total votes 35,723 100%

Peace and Freedom primary

2020 California Peace and Freedom primary[24]
Party Candidate Votes %
Peace and Freedom Gloria La Riva 2,570 66.0
Peace and Freedom Howie Hawkins 1,325 34.0
Total votes 3,895 100%

General election

Final predictions

Source Ranking
The Cook Political Report[25] Solid D
Inside Elections[26] Solid D
Sabato's Crystal Ball[27] Safe D
Politico[28] Solid D
RCP[29] Solid D
Niskanen[30] Safe D
CNN[31] Solid D
The Economist[32] Safe D
CBS News[33] Likely D
270towin[34] Safe D
ABC News[35] Solid D
NPR[36] Likely D
NBC News[37] Solid D
538[38] Solid D

Polling

Graphical summary

Aggregate polls

Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
Joe
Biden

Democratic
Donald
Trump

Republican
Other/
Undecided
[c]
Margin
270 to Win October 17–27, 2020 November 3, 2020 61.7% 32.3% 6.0% Biden +29.4
Real Clear Politics September 26 – October 21, 2020 October 27, 2020 60.7% 31.0% 8.3% Biden +29.7
FiveThirtyEight until November 2, 2020 November 3, 2020 61.6% 32.4% 6.0% Biden +29.2
Average 61.3% 31.9% 6.8% Biden +29.4

Polls

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[d]
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump

Republican
Joe
Biden

Democratic
Jo
Jorgensen

Libertarian
Howie
Hawkins

Green
Other Undecided
SurveyMonkey/Axios Oct 20 – Nov 2, 2021 12,370 (LV) ± 1.5% 36%[e] 62%
David Binder Research Oct 28 – Nov 1, 2020 800 (LV) 31% 62% 3% 4%
USC Schwarzenegger Institute Oct 27–31, 2020 1,155 (RV) ± 3% 28% 65% 4%[f] 2%
SurveyMonkey/Tableau Sep 30 – Oct 28, 2020 22,450 (LV) 37%[g] 61%
Swayable Oct 23–26, 2020 635 (LV) ± 5.2% 35% 62% 2% 1%
UC Berkeley/LA Times[1] Oct 16–21, 2020 5,352 (LV) ± 2% 29% 65% 1% 0% 0%[h][i] 3%
Public Policy Institute of California Oct 9–18, 2020 1,185 (LV) ± 4.3% 32% 58% 3% 2% 1%[j] 4%
SurveyMonkey/Tableau Sep 1–30, 2020 20,346 (LV) 35% 63% 2%
SurveyUSA Sep 26–28, 2020 588 (LV) ± 5.4% 34% 59% 3%[k] 6%
Redfield & Wilton Strategies Sep 19–21, 2020 1,775 (LV) 28% 62% 1% 1% 1%[l] 8%
UC Berkeley/LA Times[2] Sep 9–15, 2020 5,942 (LV) ± 2% 28% 67% 1% 0% 0%[m][n] 3%
Public Policy Institute of California Sep 4–13, 2020 1,168 (LV) ± 4.3% 31% 60% 3% 2% 1%[o] 2%
Spry Strategies/Women's Liberation Front Aug 29 – Sep 1, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 39% 56% 5%
SurveyMonkey/Tableau Aug 1–31, 2020 17,537 (LV) 35% 63% 2%
David Binder Research Aug 22–24, 2020 800 (LV) 31% 61% 3%[p] 5%
Redfield and Wilton Strategies Aug 9, 2020 1,904 (LV) ± 2.3% 25% 61% 1% 1% 2%[q] 9%
SurveyMonkey/Tableau Jul 1–31, 2020 19,027 (LV) 35% 63% 2%
University of California Berkeley[3] Jul 21–27, 2020 6,756 (LV) ± 2.0% 28% 67% 5%
SurveyMonkey/Tableau Jun 8–30, 2020 8,412 (LV) 36% 62% 2%
Public Policy Institute of California May 19–26, 2020 1,048 (LV) ± 4.6% 33% 57% 6%[r] 3%
SurveyUSA May 18–19, 2020 537 (LV) ± 5.4% 30% 58% 5% 7%
Emerson College May 8–10, 2020 800 (RV) ± 3.4% 35%[s] 65%
Public Policy Polling Mar 28–29, 2020 962 (RV) 29% 67% 3%
AtlasIntel Feb 24 – Mar 2, 2020 1,100 (RV) ± 3.0% 26% 62% 12%
YouGov Feb 26–28, 2020 1,507 (RV) 31% 59% 4% 4%
CNN/SSRS Feb 22–26, 2020 951 (RV) ± 3.3% 35% 60% 3%[t] 3%
University of California Berkeley Feb 20–25, 2020 5,526 (RV) 31% 58% 11%
SurveyUSA Feb 13–16, 2020 1,196 (RV) ± 3.1% 37% 57% 6%
YouGov/USC Price-Schwarzenegger Institute Feb 1–15, 2020 1,200 (RV) ± 3.1% 30% 60% 4%
SurveyUSA Jan 14–16, 2020 1,967 (RV) ± 2.8% 35% 59% 6%
CNN/SSRS Dec 4–8, 2019 1,011 (RV) ± 3.4% 36% 56% 3%[u] 5%
SurveyUSA Nov 20–22, 2019 2,039 (RV) ± 2.4% 32% 59% 9%
SurveyUSA Oct 15–16, 2019 1,242 (RV) ± 3.8% 32% 59% 9%
Emerson College Sep 13–16, 2019 830 (RV) ± 3.3% 36% 64%
SurveyUSA Sep 13–15, 2019 1,785 (RV) ± 3.2% 31% 57% 11%
SurveyUSA Aug 1–5, 2019 2,184 (RV) ± 2.7% 27% 61% 12%
SurveyUSA Mar 22–25, 2018 882 (RV) ± 3.8% 33% 56% 11%


Results

Biden won California with a smaller margin of victory than in 2016. Nevertheless, he performed well in most urban areas of the state. Biden is also the first candidate for any statewide race in California to receive over ten million votes.

2020 United States presidential election in California[39][40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Biden
Kamala Harris
11,110,250 63.48% +1.75%
Republican Donald Trump
Mike Pence
6,006,429 34.32% +2.70%
Libertarian Jo Jorgensen
Spike Cohen
187,895 1.07% -2.30%
Green Howie Hawkins
Angela Walker
81,029 0.46% -1.51%
American Independent Rocky De La Fuente
Kanye West
60,160 0.34% N/A
Peace and Freedom Gloria La Riva
Sunil Freeman
51,037 0.29% -0.18%
American Solidarity Brian Carroll (write-in)
Amar Patel (write-in)
2,605 0.01% N/A
Green Jesse Ventura (write-in)
Cynthia McKinney (write-in)
611 0.00% N/A
Independent Mark Charles (write-in)
Adrian Wallace (write-in)
559 0.00% N/A
Independent Brock Pierce (write-in)
Karla Ballard (write-in)
185 0.00% N/A
Socialist Equality Joseph Kishore (write-in)
Norissa Santa Cruz (write-in)
121 0.00% N/A
Total votes 17,500,881 100%

Results by county

County Joe Biden Donald Trump Other Total
Votes % Votes % Votes %
Alameda 617,659 80.23% 136,309 17.71% 15,896 2.06% 769,864
Alpine 476 64.24% 244 32.93% 21 2.83% 741
Amador 8,153 36.56% 13,585 60.91% 564 2.53% 22,302
Butte 50,426 49.42% 48,730 47.75% 2,886 2.83% 102,042
Calaveras 10,046 36.98% 16,518 60.81% 600 2.21% 27,164
Colusa 3,234 40.67% 4,554 57.28% 163 2.05% 7,951
Contra Costa 416,386 71.64% 152,877 26.30% 11,967 2.06% 581,230
Del Norte 4,677 40.84% 6,461 56.42% 314 2.74% 11,452
El Dorado 51,621 44.45% 61,838 53.25% 2,679 2.30% 116,138
Fresno 193,025 52.91% 164,464 45.08% 7,320 2.01% 364,809
Glenn 3,995 35.38% 7,063 62.55% 234 2.07% 11,292
Humboldt 44,768 65.04% 21,770 31.63% 2,290 3.33% 68,828
Imperial 34,678 61.14% 20,847 36.76% 1,193 2.10% 56,718
Inyo 4,634 48.88% 4,620 48.73% 227 2.39% 9,481
Kern 133,366 43.69% 164,484 53.89% 7,376 2.42% 305,226
Kings 18,699 42.64% 24,072 54.89% 1,087 2.47% 43,858
Lake 14,941 51.88% 13,123 45.57% 736 2.55% 28,800
Lassen 2,799 23.35% 8,970 74.84% 216 1.81% 11,985
Los Angeles 3,028,885 71.04% 1,145,530 26.87% 89,028 2.09% 4,263,443
Madera 23,168 43.13% 29,378 54.69% 1,176 2.18% 53,722
Marin 128,288 82.34% 24,612 15.80% 2,901 1.86% 155,801
Mariposa 4,088 39.77% 5,950 57.88% 242 2.35% 10,280
Mendocino 28,782 66.42% 13,267 30.61% 1,287 2.97% 43,336
Merced 48,991 54.11% 39,397 43.51% 2,153 2.38% 90,541
Modoc 1,150 26.51% 3,109 71.67% 79 1.82% 4,338
Mono 4,013 59.57% 2,513 37.30% 211 3.13% 6,737
Monterey 113,953 69.53% 46,299 28.25% 3,631 2.22% 163,883
Napa 49,817 69.07% 20,676 28.67% 1,629 2.26% 72,122
Nevada 36,359 56.16% 26,779 41.37% 1,600 2.47% 64,738
Orange 814,009 53.49% 676,498 44.46% 31,218 2.05% 1,521,725
Placer 106,869 45.47% 122,488 52.12% 5,660 2.41% 235,017
Plumas 4,561 40.52% 6,445 57.26% 250 2.22% 11,256
Riverside 527,945 53.00% 448,702 45.04% 19,509 1.96% 996,156
Sacramento 440,808 61.37% 259,405 36.11% 18,077 2.52% 718,290
San Benito 17,628 61.16% 10,590 36.74% 603 2.10% 28,821
San Bernardino 455,859 54.21% 366,257 43.55% 18,815 2.24% 840,931
San Diego 964,650 60.23% 600,094 37.47% 36,978 2.30% 1,601,722
San Francisco 378,156 85.27% 56,417 12.72% 8,885 2.01% 443,458
San Joaquin 161,137 55.86% 121,098 41.99% 6,208 2.15% 288,443
San Luis Obispo 88,310 55.30% 67,436 42.23% 3,935 2.47% 159,681
San Mateo 291,410 77.91% 75,563 20.20% 7,085 1.89% 374,058
Santa Barbara 129,963 64.89% 65,736 32.82% 4,589 2.29% 200,288
Santa Clara 617,967 72.66% 214,612 25.23% 17,943 2.11% 850,522
Santa Cruz 114,246 78.90% 26,937 18.60% 3,613 2.50% 144,796
Shasta 30,000 32.29% 60,789 65.43% 2,111 2.28% 92,900
Sierra 730 37.82% 1,142 59.17% 58 3.01% 1,930
Siskiyou 9,593 40.91% 13,290 56.67% 567 2.42% 23,450
Solano 131,639 63.95% 69,306 33.67% 4,886 2.38% 205,831
Sonoma 199,938 74.53% 61,825 23.05% 6,489 2.42% 268,252
Stanislaus 105,841 49.26% 104,145 48.47% 4,890 2.27% 214,876
Sutter 17,367 40.73% 24,375 57.16% 898 2.11% 42,640
Tehama 8,911 31.03% 19,141 66.64% 669 2.33% 28,721
Trinity 2,851 45.56% 3,188 50.94% 219 3.50% 6,258
Tulare 66,105 45.02% 77,579 52.84% 3,148 2.14% 146,832
Tuolumne 11,978 39.40% 17,689 58.19% 734 2.41% 30,401
Ventura 251,388 59.47% 162,207 38.37% 9,103 2.16% 422,698
Yolo 67,598 69.50% 27,292 28.06% 2,374 2.44% 97,264
Yuba 11,230 37.70% 17,676 59.34% 881 2.96% 29,787
Total 11,110,250 63.48% 6,006,429 34.32% 384,202 2.20% 17,500,881

By congressional district

Biden won 46 out of the 53 congressional districts in California.

District Trump Biden Representative
1st 56% 41% Doug LaMalfa
2nd 24% 74% Jared Huffman
3rd 43% 55% John Garamendi
4th 54% 44% Tom McClintock
5th 25% 72% Mike Thompson
6th 27% 70% Doris Matsui
7th 42% 56% Ami Bera
8th 54% 44% Paul Cook
Jay Obernolte
9th 40% 58% Jerry McNerney
10th 47% 50% Josh Harder
11th 24% 74% Mark DeSaulnier
12th 12% 86% Nancy Pelosi
13th 9% 89% Barbara Lee
14th 21% 78% Jackie Speier
15th 26% 72% Eric Swalwell
16th 39% 59% Jim Costa
17th 26% 73% Ro Khanna
18th 21% 76% Anna Eshoo
19th 28% 70% Zoe Lofgren
20th 25% 73% Jimmy Panetta
21st 44% 54% TJ Cox
David Valadao
22nd 52% 46% Devin Nunes
23rd 57% 41% Kevin McCarthy
24th 37% 61% Salud Carbajal
25th 44% 54% Mike Garcia
26th 37% 61% Julia Brownley
27th 31% 67% Judy Chu
28th 27% 71% Adam Schiff
29th 24% 74% Tony Cárdenas
30th 29% 69% Brad Sherman
31st 39% 59% Pete Aguilar
32nd 33% 65% Grace Napolitano
33rd 29% 69% Ted Lieu
34th 17% 81% Jimmy Gomez
35th 33% 65% Norma Torres
36th 42% 56% Raul Ruiz
37th 14% 84% Karen Bass
38th 32% 66% Linda Sánchez
39th 44% 54% Gil Cisneros
Young Kim
40th 21% 77% Lucille Roybal-Allard
41st 36% 62% Mark Takano
42nd 53% 45% Ken Calvert
43rd 21% 77% Maxine Waters
44th 19% 78% Nanette Barragán
45th 43% 55% Katie Porter
46th 34% 64% Lou Correa
47th 35% 62% Alan Lowenthal
48th 48% 50% Harley Rouda
Michelle Steel
49th 43% 55% Mike Levin
50th 53% 45% Darrell Issa
51st 31% 67% Juan Vargas
52nd 34% 63% Scott Peters
53rd 31% 67% Susan Davis
Sara Jacobs

Counties that flipped from Republican to Democratic

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The other five states were Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, and New York, as well as Washington DC.
  2. ^ a b c Candidate withdrew after early voting started, but before the date of the election.
  3. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  5. ^ Overlapping sample with the previous SurveyMonkey/Axios poll, but more information available regarding sample size
  6. ^ "Someone else" with 4%
  7. ^ Overlapping sample with the previous SurveyMonkey/Axios poll, but more information available regarding sample size
  8. ^ De La Fuente (A) and De La Riva (PSOL) with 0%
  9. ^ De La Fuente listed as Guerra
  10. ^ Would not vote with 1%; "Someone else" with no voters
  11. ^ "Another candidate" with 3%
  12. ^ "Another Third Party/Write-in" with 1%
  13. ^ De La Fuente (A) and De La Riva (PSOL) with 0%
  14. ^ De La Fuente listed as Guerra
  15. ^ "Would not vote" with 1%; "Someone else" with no voters
  16. ^ "Someone else" with 3%
  17. ^ "Another Third Party/Write-in" with 2%
  18. ^ "Someone else" with 4%; would not vote with 2%
  19. ^ Including voters who lean towards a given candidate
  20. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 3%
  21. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 3%
  22. ^ "Other" with 3%; would not vote with 3%
  23. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 3%
  24. ^ Other with 1%; neither with 3%
  25. ^ "Other" with 3%; would not vote with 2%
  26. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 3%
  27. ^ Other with 1%; neither with 3%
  28. ^ "Other" with 6%; would not vote with 4%
  29. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 4%
  30. ^ "Other" with 5%; would not vote with 2%
  31. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 4%
  32. ^ "Other" with 5%; would not vote with 3%
  33. ^ Other with 0%; neither with 4%
  34. ^ Other with 1%; neither with 3%

References

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Further reading

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