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2020 Vermont gubernatorial election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 Vermont gubernatorial election

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →
 
Phil Scott 2019.png
Lt Gov David Zuckerman.jpg
Nominee Phil Scott David Zuckerman
Party Republican Progressive
Alliance Democratic
Popular vote 248,412 99,214
Percentage 68.5% 27.4%

2020 Vermont gubernatorial election - Results by municipality.svg
Town results

Governor before election

Phil Scott
Republican

Elected Governor

Phil Scott
Republican

The 2020 Vermont gubernatorial election was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the Governor of Vermont. As Vermont does not impose term limits upon its governors, incumbent Republican Governor Phil Scott was eligible to run for reelection to a third two-year term in office. On November 18, 2019, he confirmed that he was running for reelection, but did not yet publicly announce his campaign.[1] On May 28, 2020, he officially announced his candidacy but stated that he would not campaign, maintain a campaign staff, or fundraise until the state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Vermont ended.[2] The primary was held on August 11. Scott won re-election to a third term, defeating Progressive and Democratic nominee, Lieutenant Governor David Zuckerman. Scott's 41% victory margin was the largest in a state gubernatorial election since 1996, and the largest for a Republican since 1950.

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

  • John Klar, lawyer and pastor[3]
  • Bernard Peters, Independent candidate for Governor in 2014 and for State Representative in 1986
  • Emily Peyton, independent candidate for Governor in 2012 and 2014, Liberty Union nominee for Governor in 2018[4]
  • Douglas Cavett[5]

Results

Results by county: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Scott—80–90%   Scott—70–80%   Scott—60–70%
Results by county:
  Scott—80–90%
  Scott—70–80%
  Scott—60–70%
Republican primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Phil Scott (incumbent) 42,275 72.67%
Republican John Klar 12,762 21.94%
Republican Emily Peyton 970 1.67%
Republican Douglas Cavett 966 1.66%
Republican Bernard Peters 772 1.33%
Republican Write-ins 426 0.73%
Total votes 58,171 100.0%

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Declined

Endorsements

Rebecca Holcombe
State officials
Party chairs
Organizations
David Zuckerman
Federal officials
Individuals

Debates & forums

Results

Results by county:   Zuckerman—50–60%   Zuckerman—40–50%   Zuckerman—30–40%   Holcombe—40–50%
Results by county:
  Zuckerman—50–60%
  Zuckerman—40–50%
  Zuckerman—30–40%
  Holcombe—40–50%
Democratic primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Zuckerman 48,150 47.56%
Democratic Rebecca Holcombe 37,599 37.14%
Democratic Patrick Winburn 7,662 7.57%
Democratic Ralph Corbo 1,288 1.27%
Democratic Write-ins 6,533 6.45%
Total votes 101,232 100.0%

Progressive Party

Leaders within the Progressive Party endorsed David Zuckerman for the gubernational election, advocating for Zuckerman to be elected with write-in voters.[19] The party has stated that if Cris Ericson won the primary, "they would likely issue a 'non-endorsement.'"[19] On election night the progressive nomination was listed as too close to call.[20] Zuckerman was confirmed to have won the nomination a few days later when the final write-in vote count was confirmed.

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Results

Progressive primary results[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive David Zuckerman (write-in) 273 32.62%
Progressive Cris Ericson 254 30.35%
Progressive Boots Wardinski 239 28.55%
Progressive Phil Scott (write-in) 41 4.90%
Progressive Write-ins (other) 30 3.58%
Total votes 837 100.0%

General election

Candidates

  • Wayne Billado III (I), also ran for Lt. Governor, State Senator from Franklin County, and State Representative from Franklin 3-1 district
  • Michael A. Devost (I)
  • Charly Dickerson (I)
  • Kevin Hoyt (I), Republican nominee for State Representative from Bennington 2-1 in 2018[21]
  • Emily Peyton (I), candidate for Governor in 2012, 2014, and 2018[22]
  • Phil Scott (R), incumbent Governor, former Lieutenant Governor and State Senator
  • Erynn Hazlett Whitney (I)
  • David Zuckerman (P/D), Lieutenant Governor, former member of State Legislature, farmer, businessman, environmentalist

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
Inside Elections[23] Safe R October 16, 2020
270toWin[24] Safe R October 16, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[25] Safe R October 8, 2020
The Cook Political Report[26] Safe R September 15, 2020
Politico[27] Likely R September 9, 2020
RCP[28] Likely R July 29, 2020
Daily Kos[29] Likely R July 22, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
Phil
Scott (R)
David
Zuckerman (P/D)
Other /
Undecided
Braun Research September 3–15, 2020 582 (LV) ± 4% 55% 24% 17%[c]
We Ask America June 2–3, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 60% 25% 15%
Braun Research February 4–10, 2020 603 (RV) ± 4.0% 52% 29% 19%
Hypothetical polling
with Rebecca Holcombe
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
Phil
Scott
(R)
Rebecca
Holcombe (D)
Other /
Undecided
We Ask America June 2–3, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 62% 20% 18%
Braun Research/VPR February 4–10, 2020 603 (RV) ± 4.0% 55% 20% 26%

Endorsements

David Zuckerman (P/D)
Federal officials
  • Bernie Sanders, U.S. Senator from Vermont, candidate for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020[16]
State politicians
Individuals
Organizations

Debates & forums

Results

2020 Vermont gubernatorial election[33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Phil Scott (incumbent) 248,412 68.49% +13.30%
Progressive David Zuckerman 99,214 27.35% -12.90%
Independent Kevin Hoyt 4,576 1.26% N/A
Independent Emily Peyton 3,505 0.97% N/A
Independent Erynn Hazlett Whitney 1,777 0.49% N/A
Independent Wayne Billado III 1,431 0.39% N/A
Independent Michael A. Devost 1,160 0.32% N/A
Independent Charly Dickerson 1,037 0.29% N/A
Write-in 1,599 0.44% N/A
Total votes 362,711 100.0% +32.33
N/A Over Votes 170
N/A Blank Votes 8,087
Turnout 370,968 73.27%
Registered electors 506,312
Republican hold

Notes

  1. ^ Zuckerman is a member of the Progressive Party but also runs in Democratic primaries.
  2. ^ a b Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  3. ^ "Other/not sure/no opinion" with 16%; "No one/not voting on this item" with 1%; Billado (I), Devot (I), Dickerson (I), Hoyt (I), "refused" and Whitney (I) with 0%

References

  1. ^ a b Landen, Xander. "Scott says he's undecided on 2020 — but he's already fundraising". Vermont Digger. Retrieved December 4, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Baird, Joel Banner. "Gov. Scott seeks a third term, but will forego a campaign and fundraising". Burlington Free Press. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  3. ^ Margolis, Jon (2019-10-28). "Margolis: 'Rural populist' and GOP newcomer announces candidacy for governor". VTDigger. Retrieved 2019-10-30.
  4. ^ a b c "Election Information & Resources". sos.vermont.gov. Retrieved 2020-05-28.
  5. ^ "Vermont 2020 Candidate List".
  6. ^ a b c "Vermont Election Results - Official Results". Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  7. ^ Kinzel, Bob (January 13, 2020). "Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman Confirms The Speculation: He's Running For Governor In 2020". Vermont Public Radio. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  8. ^ https://ballot-access.org/2020/08/18/david-zuckerman-wins-vermont-progressie-party-gubernatorial-nomination-by-write-in-votes/
  9. ^ Heintz, Paul (July 16, 2019). "Former Ed Secretary Rebecca Holcombe to Run for Governor of Vermont". Seven Days. Retrieved 2019-07-16.
  10. ^ "Winburn for Governor | Winburn2020.com | United States". Mysite.
  11. ^ Landen, Xander; Norton, Kit; Meyn, Colin (June 5, 2019). "Attorney general eyes run for governor in 2020. 'I've had conversations.'". VTDigger. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  12. ^ Landen, Xander (November 21, 2018). "Hallquist isn't ruling out another run. But for now, she's job hunting". VTDigger. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  13. ^ "Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox announces he is running for Utah governor, vows a 'different,' positive campaign". The Salt Lake Tribune. May 14, 2019.
  14. ^ "Supporter". Rebecca for Vermont. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  15. ^ "EMILY's List Endorses Rebecca Holcombe for Vermont Governor". www.emilyslist.org.
  16. ^ a b "Bernie Sanders Endorses David Zuckerman for Governor". Seven Days.
  17. ^ a b c d "Ben and Jerry Endorse David". David Zuckerman for Governor. February 23, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  18. ^ a b "Bill McKibben Endorses David Zuckerman". David Zuckerman for Governor. February 13, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  19. ^ a b Elder-Connors, Liam. "Progressive Party Asks For Write-In To Beat Gubernatorial Candidates On Its Ballot". www.vpr.org. Retrieved 13 August 2020.
  20. ^ "Progressive governor race still too close to call". VTDigger. August 13, 2020.
  21. ^ "VT Elections Database » Candidate Profile..." VT Elections Database.
  22. ^ "VT Elections Database » Candidate Profile..." VT Elections Database.
  23. ^ "Gubernatorial Ratings | Inside Elections". insideelections.com. Retrieved 2019-03-16.
  24. ^ "2020 Gubernatorial Elections Map". 270towin.
  25. ^ "2020 Governor". Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball. 2019-08-22. Retrieved 2019-09-26.
  26. ^ "2020 Governor Race ratings". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  27. ^ "We rated every gubernatorial race in 2020. Here's who we think will win". Politico. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  28. ^ "2020 Governor Races". RealClearPolitics. June 13, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  29. ^ "2020 Governor Race Ratings". Daily Kos. June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  30. ^ https://twitter.com/BrendaForVT/status/1312217911088623616?s=20
  31. ^ "It Is Time. We Can't Wait". us18.campaign-archive.com.
  32. ^ a b c "Campaign Briefs: Zuckerman announces ex-gov endorsements". The Brattleboro Reformer. September 28, 2020. Retrieved September 29, 2020.
  33. ^ "2020 General Election Canvass Report" (PDF). Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved November 19, 2020.

External links

Official campaign websites
This page was last edited on 31 January 2021, at 20:36
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