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2021 United States elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2021 United States elections
2019          2020          2021          2022          2023
Off-year elections
Election dayNovember 2
House elections
Seats contested6 early-term vacancies
Net seat change0
Color coded map of 2021 House of Representatives special election results
     Republican hold
     Democratic hold
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested3
(including a recall election in California)
Net seat changeRepublican +1
2021 California gubernatorial recall election2021 New Jersey gubernatorial election2021 Virginia gubernatorial election2021 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
About this image
     Democratic hold
     Republican gain
     No election

The 2021 United States elections were held in large part on Tuesday, November 2, 2021. This off-year election included the regular gubernatorial elections in New Jersey and Virginia. In addition, state legislative elections were held in New Jersey and the Virginia House of Delegates (the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly), along with numerous state legislative special elections, citizen initiatives, mayoral races, and a variety of other local elections. Six special elections to the United States House of Representatives also took place on November 2 or earlier as a result of either deaths or vacancies. The first of these was held on March 20.

Widely characterized as a red wave election, and as a prelude to the 2022 mid-terms, Republican candidates made significant gains up and down the ballot.[1][2] Glenn Youngkin, the Republican nominee in the Virginia gubernatorial election, prevailed against Democratic nominee Terry McAuliffe in an upset.[3] Youngkin promised to ban the teaching of critical race theory within public schools on "day one" of his administration, push back against certain COVID-19 mandates and restrictions, and advocate for a low tax and small government agenda within the state of Virginia.[4][5][6] Within the Democratic Party, moderate nominees generally prevailed against left-wing candidates, and progressive policies by and large saw rejection;[1][7][8][9][10] a proposal to defund and replace the Minneapolis police department was defeated.[11]

The results were interpreted by some political commentators as a backlash against the policies of the Biden administration and/or cultural liberalism and wokeism within the party.[7][10][12][13][14][15] Others saw Democrats' perceived failure to enact their legislative agenda in Congress as the main impetus behind Republican victories, interpreting Democratic losses as public frustration at the Biden administration not following through on its promises to implement transformative policy.

Federal elections

Senate

As part of the 2020 United States Senate elections, Georgia held run-off elections for both of its Senate seats on January 5, 2021. The run-off elections were triggered because of a Georgia law requiring a second round when no individual wins a majority of the vote in most federal, state, and local elections.[a] Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock were the victors in those special elections, which gave the Democrats a total of 48 seats to the Republicans' 50. However, the victories resulted in a shift of power to the Democrats; the other two Senators, Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine, are both independents who belong to the Democrats' caucus, and since any tied vote is broken by the President of the Senate—in this case Vice President Kamala Harris, also a Democrat—the Democrats technically hold a one-seat majority.

House of Representatives

Six special elections were held throughout 2021 to fill vacancies during the 117th U.S. Congress.

Puerto Rican shadow delegation

In May, Puerto Rico held a shadow congressional delegation election to elect two senators and four representatives to replace the shadow delegation first appointed in 2017. The shadow senators and representatives are not seated in Congress, but are charged with advancing Puerto Rico's statehood efforts. In the preliminary results from election night, former at-large senator Melinda Romero and lawyer Zoraida Buxo earned the most votes for senator,[30] and conservative commentator Elizabeth Torres, municipal lawmaker Roberto Lefranc Fortuño, former Ponce Mayor María Meléndez, and Junventud PNP director Adriel Vélez earned the most votes for the House delegation.[31] However, former governor Ricardo Rosselló earned enough write-in votes to gain a seat in the House delegation over Vélez.[32][33][34] Voter turnout was at a record low level — 3.92% — in the election.[35]

State elections

Gubernatorial

Two states held regularly scheduled gubernatorial elections in 2021, and one more state held a recall election:

Lieutenant gubernatorial

One state held a lieutenant gubernatorial election in 2021:

  • Virginia: One-term Democratic Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax was eligible to run for a second term, but instead ran unsuccessfully for Governor.[58] State delegate Hala Ayala won the Democratic primary and former state delegate Winsome Sears was nominated at the Republican convention.[59] On November 2, 2021, Republican candidate Sears prevailed and was elected lieutenant governor of Virginia.

Attorney general

One state held an attorney general election in 2021:

  • Virginia: Two-term Democratic Attorney General Mark Herring initially ran for governor but withdrew to run for a third term.[60] He defeated state delegate Jay Jones in the Democratic primary.[61] State delegate Jason Miyares was nominated at the Republican convention.[62] On November 3, Miyares defeated Herring, and became the next attorney general of Virginia.

Legislative

Legislative elections were held for both houses of the New Jersey Legislature and the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. Democrats maintained majority control of the New Jersey Senate and the General Assembly. Republicans regained control of the Virginia House of Delegates, which had been held by Democrats since 2019.

Local elections

Mayoral elections

Since the beginning of 2021, various major cities have seen incumbent mayors re-elected, including Birmingham (Randall Woodfin) and Mobile, Alabama (Sandy Stimpson); Miami (Francis X. Suarez) and North Miami, Florida (Philippe Bien-Aime); New Orleans, Louisiana (LaToya Cantrell); Detroit (Mike Duggan) and Lansing, Michigan (Andy Schor); Minneapolis (Jacob Frey) and St. Paul, Minnesota (Melvin Carter);[63] Jackson, Mississippi (Chokwe Antar Lumumba); Springfield, Missouri (Ken McClure); Omaha, Nebraska (Jean Stothert); Manchester, New Hampshire (Joyce Craig);[64] Jersey City, New Jersey (Steven Fulop); Albuquerque, New Mexico (Tim Keller); Buffalo (Byron Brown) and Syracuse, New York (Ben Walsh);[65][66] Toledo, Ohio (Wade Kapszukiewicz); Lancaster, Pennsylvania (Danene Sorace);[67] San Antonio, Texas (Ron Nirenberg); Burlington, Vermont (Miro Weinberger); and Alexandria, Virginia (Justin Wilson).

Open mayoral seats were won in Anchorage, Alaska (Dave Bronson);[68] St. Petersburg, Florida (Ken Welch); Atlanta, Georgia (Andre Dickens);[69] St. Louis, Missouri (Tishaura Jones);[70][71] New York City (Eric Adams); Durham, North Carolina (Elaine O'Neal); Cincinnati (Aftab Pureval) and Cleveland, Ohio (Justin Bibb);[72] Arlington (Jim Ross), Fort Worth (Mattie Parker) and Plano, Texas (John Muns); and Seattle, Washington (Bruce Harrell).[73]

In Kansas City, Kansas, former KCKPD deputy chief Tyrone Garner narrowly defeated incumbent David Alvey in a runoff election.[74] In Boston, Massachusetts, city councilwoman Michelle Wu was elected to succeed acting mayor Kim Janey, who came in fourth in the blanket primary. Janey was appointed to replace Marty Walsh, who resigned on March 22, 2021, to become the United States Secretary of Labor. In Rochester, New York, city councilman Malik Evans ran unopposed after defeating incumbent two-term Lovely Warren in the primary election. In Allentown, Pennsylvania, businessman Matthew Tuerk was elected to replace incumbent Ray O'Connell, who lost renomination in the Democratic primary. In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, two-term incumbent Eric Papenfuse ran a write-in campaign after losing nomination to city council president Wanda Williams, who ultimately won the general election.[75][76][77] In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, state representative Ed Gainey was elected to replace two-term incumbent Bill Peduto, who lost renomination in the Democratic primary. In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Republican Tiffany O'Donnell was elected after incumbent Republican Brad Hart failed to advance to the runoff.

Other municipal elections

Tribal elections

Several notable Native American tribes held elections in 2021 for tribal executives, including the Aroostook Band of Micmacs, Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. Tim Nuvangyaoma was reelected as chairman of the Hopi Tribe.[83]

The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina elected John Lowery as chairman.[84] In the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's elections, Vice President Scott Herman unseated Tribal President Rodney M. Bordeaux.[85]

The Cherokee Nation held elections to its Tribal Council on June 5.[86]

In July 2021, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe voters elected Ronald LaFrance Jr. chief in a special election, ousting incumbent chief Eric Thompson. Thompson had narrowly beaten LaFrance, who ran as a write-in candidate in the regular June election, but appeals called that election into question, resulting in the special election.[87]

Table of state, territorial, and federal results

This table shows the partisan results of president, congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2021. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and Senate elections in 2021. The five territories and Washington, D. C., do not elect members of the Senate, and the territories do not take part in presidential elections; instead, they each elect one non-voting member of the House. Nebraska's unicameral legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are elected on a non-partisan basis, and, therefore, political party affiliation is not listed.

State/terr. and PVI[88] Before 2021 elections After 2021 elections
State or Territory 2021
PVI
Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
 
Alabama R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
Alaska R+9 Rep Split[b] Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Split[c] Rep Rep 1–0
Arizona R+3 Rep Rep Dem Dem 5–4 Rep Rep Dem Dem 5–4
Arkansas R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
California D+14 Dem Dem Dem Dem 42–11 Dem Dem Dem Dem 42–11
Colorado D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–3
Connecticut D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0
Delaware D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0
Florida R+3 Rep Rep Rep Rep 16–11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 16–11
Georgia R+3 Rep Rep Dem Rep 8–6 Rep Rep Dem Rep 8–6
Hawaii D+15 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
Idaho R+19 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0
Illinois D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5
Indiana R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Iowa R+6 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kansas R+11 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Kentucky R+16 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Louisiana R+12 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1
Maine D+1 Dem Dem Split R/I[d] Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Split R/I[d] Dem 2–0
Maryland D+14 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1
Massachusetts D+14 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0
Michigan R+1 Dem Rep Dem Split 7–7 Dem Rep Dem Split 7–7
Minnesota D+1 Dem Split Dem Split 4–4 Dem Split Dem Split 4–4
Mississippi R+10 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1
Missouri R+11 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2
Montana R+11 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Split Rep 1–0
Nebraska R+13 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0
Nevada Even Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1
New Hampshire Even Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0 Rep Rep Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2
New Mexico D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–1
New York D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 19–8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 19–8
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 8–5 Dem Rep Rep Rep 8–5
North Dakota R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Ohio R+6 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–0
Oregon D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1
Pennsylvania R+2 Dem Rep Split Split 9–9 Dem Rep Split Split 9–9
Rhode Island D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–1
South Dakota R+16 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2
Texas R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 23–13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 23–13
Utah R+13 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0
Vermont D+15 Rep Dem Split D/I[e] Dem 1–0 Rep Dem Split D/I[e] Dem 1–0
Virginia D+2 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–4 Rep Split Dem Dem 7–4
Washington D+8 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3
West Virginia R+23 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0
Wisconsin R+2 Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3 Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3
Wyoming R+26 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0
United States Even Rep 27–23 Rep 29–18–2 Dem 50–50 Dem 222–213 Rep 28–22 Rep 29–17–3 Dem 50–50 Dem 222–213
Washington, D. C. D+43 Dem[f] Dem[f] N/A Dem Dem Dem N/A Dem
American Samoa N/A NP/D[g] NP Rep NP/D[g] NP
Guam Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Split[h] Ind[i]
Puerto Rico PNP/D[j] PDP PNP/R[k] PNP/D[j] PNP/R[k]
U.S. Virgin Islands Dem Dem Dem
State or Territory PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
State/Terr. and PVI Before 2021 elections After 2021 elections

Notes

  1. ^ Georgia's run-off law applies to all races except for presidential elections.[16]
  2. ^ Republicans won a majority of seats in the state house, but Democrats formed a majority coalition with independents and some Republicans.
  3. ^ Republicans won a majority of seats in the state house, but Democrats formed a majority coalition with independents and some Republicans.
  4. ^ a b One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  5. ^ a b One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  6. ^ a b Washington, D.C., does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council. If the city attains statehood, the mayoral and council elections will be repurposed as those for the governor and House of Delegates respectively.
  7. ^ a b Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga affiliates with the Democratic Party.
  8. ^ Republicans control the Northern Mariana Islands Senate, but no party holds a majority in the Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives.
  9. ^ The Northern Mariana Islands' delegate to Congress, Gregorio Sablan, was elected as an Independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2009.
  10. ^ a b Puerto Rican Governor Pedro Pierluisi is a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party, but affiliates with the Democratic Party at the national level.
  11. ^ a b Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with the Republicans since taking office in 2017.

References

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