To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2020 United States elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States elections
2019          2020           2021
Presidential election year
Election dayNovember 3
Incumbent presidentDonald Trump (Republican)
Next Congress117th
Presidential election
Electoral vote
2020 United States presidential election in California2020 United States presidential election in Oregon2020 United States presidential election in Washington (state)2020 United States presidential election in Idaho2020 United States presidential election in Nevada2020 United States presidential election in Utah2020 United States presidential election in Arizona2020 United States presidential election in Montana2020 United States presidential election in Wyoming2020 United States presidential election in Colorado2020 United States presidential election in New Mexico2020 United States presidential election in North Dakota2020 United States presidential election in South Dakota2020 United States presidential election in Nebraska2020 United States presidential election in Kansas2020 United States presidential election in Oklahoma2020 United States presidential election in Texas2020 United States presidential election in Minnesota2020 United States presidential election in Iowa2020 United States presidential election in Missouri2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas2020 United States presidential election in Louisiana2020 United States presidential election in Wisconsin2020 United States presidential election in Illinois2020 United States presidential election in Michigan2020 United States presidential election in Indiana2020 United States presidential election in Ohio2020 United States presidential election in Kentucky2020 United States presidential election in Tennessee2020 United States presidential election in Mississippi2020 United States presidential election in Alabama2020 United States presidential election in Georgia2020 United States presidential election in Florida2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina2020 United States presidential election in North Carolina2020 United States presidential election in Virginia2020 United States presidential election in West Virginia2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in New York2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New Hampshire2020 United States presidential election in Maine2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Hawaii2020 United States presidential election in Alaska2020 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2020 United States presidential election in Maryland2020 United States presidential election in Delaware2020 United States presidential election in New Jersey2020 United States presidential election in Connecticut2020 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2020 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2020 United States presidential election in Vermont2020 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege2020.svg
About this image
The electoral map for the 2020 election, based on populations from the 2010 Census
Senate elections
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 seats of Class II + 2 special elections)
2020 United States Senate special election in Georgia2020 United States Senate election in Alabama2020 United States Senate election in Alaska2020 United States Senate special election in Arizona2020 United States Senate election in Arkansas2020 United States Senate election in Colorado2020 United States Senate election in Delaware2020 United States Senate election in Georgia2020 United States Senate election in Idaho2020 United States Senate election in Illinois2020 United States Senate election in Iowa2020 United States Senate election in Kansas2020 United States Senate election in Kentucky2020 United States Senate election in Louisiana2020 United States Senate election in Maine2020 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2020 United States Senate election in Michigan2020 United States Senate election in Minnesota2020 United States Senate election in Mississippi2020 United States Senate election in Montana2020 United States Senate election in Nebraska2020 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2020 United States Senate election in New Jersey2020 United States Senate election in New Mexico2020 United States Senate election in North Carolina2020 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2020 United States Senate election in Oregon2020 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2020 United States Senate election in South Carolina2020 United States Senate election in South Dakota2020 United States Senate election in Tennessee2020 United States Senate election in Texas2020 United States Senate election in Virginia2020 United States Senate election in West Virginia2020 United States Senate election in WyomingUnited States Senate elections, 2020.svg
About this image
Map of the 2020 Senate races
(Georgia holding two Senate elections)
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent
     Retiring Democratic incumbent      Retiring Republican incumbent
House elections
Seats contestedAll 435 voting-members
All six non-voting delegates
Color coded map of 2020 House of Representatives races
Map of the 2020 House of Representatives elections
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent      Undetermined incumbent
     Retiring or defeated Democratic incumbent
     Retiring or defeated Republican incumbent
     Retiring Libertarian incumbent
Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested13 (11 states, two territories)
2020 Delaware gubernatorial election2020 Indiana gubernatorial election2020 Missouri gubernatorial election2020 Montana gubernatorial election2020 New Hampshire gubernatorial election2020 North Carolina gubernatorial election2020 North Dakota gubernatorial election2020 Utah gubernatorial election2020 Vermont gubernatorial election2020 Washington gubernatorial election2020 West Virginia gubernatorial election2020 American Samoa gubernatorial election2020 Puerto Rico gubernatorial election2020 United States gubernatorial retirements.svg
About this image
Map of the 2020 gubernatorial races
     Democratic incumbent      Republican incumbent
     Term-limited Democrat      Retiring Republican
     Defeated New Progressive      Term-limited non-partisan

The 2020 United States elections are scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020. All 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives, 35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate, and the office of President of the United States will be contested. Thirteen state and territorial governorships, as well as numerous other state and local elections, will also be contested.

Both the Republican Party and the Democratic Party nominated their respective presidential tickets at party conventions held in late August. Incumbent president Donald Trump is the Republican nominee, and had few opponents in the 2020 Republican Party presidential primaries. Joe Biden is the Democratic Party's nominee after securing a majority of delegates in the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries. Various third party and independent candidates, including Jo Jorgensen of the Libertarian Party and Howie Hawkins of the Green Party, are also seeking the presidency.

Democrats have held a majority in the U.S. House of Representatives since the 2018 elections, while Republicans have held control of the U.S. Senate since the 2014 elections. Barring vacancies and party-switching, Democrats will enter the election with control of approximately 232 of the 435 seats in the House of Representatives,[a] while Republicans will enter the 2020 elections with control of 53 of the 100 seats in the Senate. All 33 Class 2 senators are up for election, and two states (Georgia and Arizona) are holding special elections for the Senate. The six non-voting congressional delegates from the District of Columbia and the permanently inhabited U.S. territories will also be elected.

Regularly-scheduled elections will be held in 86 of the 99 state legislative chambers, and eleven states will hold gubernatorial elections. Various other state executive and judicial elections will also occur. The outcome of these state elections will have a major impact on the redistricting cycle that will take place following the 2020 United States Census. Various referendums, tribal elections, and local elections, including numerous mayoral races, will also take place in 2020.

Federal elections

Presidential election

The U.S. presidential election of 2020 will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. The individual who wins a majority of the presidential electoral vote (270 of the 538 electoral votes) will win election to a term lasting from January 20, 2021 to January 20, 2025. If no individual wins a majority of the electoral vote, then the United States House of Representatives will hold a contingent election to determine the winner.[b] Each presidential elector is chosen by the states, and is charged with casting one vote for president and one vote for vice president. Most states award all their electoral votes to the individual who wins a majority or plurality of that state's popular vote, although two states award electors by congressional districts. The vice president is selected in a similar manner, though a contingent election will be held in the United States Senate if no individual receives a majority of the vice presidential electoral vote.

Incumbent Republican president Donald Trump won re-nomination after facing token opposition in the 2020 Republican primaries.[1][2] The Republican Party also re-nominated Vice President Mike Pence as Trump's running mate for the 2020 election. The Democratic Party, the other major party in the United States, has nominated former vice president Joe Biden for president and Senator Kamala Harris of California for vice president. Biden became the party's presumptive nominee in early April 2020 after Bernie Sanders withdrew from the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries.[3] Along with Biden and Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Michael Bloomberg, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, and Tulsi Gabbard all won at least one delegate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries.[4]

Various third parties and independent candidates are also seeking the presidency. The respective presidential candidates of two third parties, the Libertarian Party and the Green Party, won at least one percent of the national popular vote in 2016. For the 2020 election, the Libertarian Party has nominated a ticket consisting of Jo Jorgensen and Spike Cohen, while the Green Party has nominated a ticket consisting of Howie Hawkins and Angela Nicole Walker. Other presidential candidates include Don Blankenship of the Constitution Party, Rocky De La Fuente of the Alliance Party, Gloria La Riva of the Party for Socialism and Liberation, Brian T. Carroll of the American Solidarity Party, independent candidate Brock Pierce, and rapper Kanye West, who is affiliated with the Birthday Party.[5]

Congressional elections

Senate elections

33 12 2 23 30
33 Democrats
not up
12 Democrats
up
[c] 23 Republicans
up
30 Republicans
not up
Control of Senate seats by class after the 2018 elections
Class Democratic Independent Republican Next
elections
1 21 2 10 2024
2 12 0 21 2020
3 12 0 22 2022
Total 45 2 53

At least 35 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate will be up for election. All seats of Senate Class II will be up for election; the winners of those elections will serve six-year terms. Additionally, Arizona and Georgia will hold special elections to fill Class III Senate vacancies; the winners of those elections will serve two-year terms. Other states may also hold special elections if vacancies arise.

Republicans won control of the Senate in the 2014 Senate elections and retained that majority through the 2016 and 2018 Senate elections. Republicans currently hold 53 Senate seats, while Democrats hold 45 seats, and independents hold two seats. Both independents have caucused with the Democratic Party since joining the Senate. Barring further vacancies or party switching, 21 Republican-held seats, along with 12 Democratic-held seats, will be up for election. If they win the vice presidency, Democrats will need to achieve a net gain of at least three seats to take the majority; otherwise, they will need to achieve a net gain of at least four seats to take the majority.

House of Representatives elections

All 435 voting seats in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election; 218 seats are necessary for a majority. The winners of each race will serve a two-year term.

Democrats gained control of the House of Representatives in the 2018 elections, winning 235 seats compared to 199 seats for Republicans.[d] Due to vacancies and party-switching that have occurred since the 2018 elections, Democrats currently hold 232 seats, compared to 198 seats held by Republicans and one seat, that of Justin Amash, held by the Libertarian Party. Depending on potential future vacancies and party switching, Republicans will need a net gain of approximately twenty seats to take control of the House of Representatives.

Special elections

Four special elections have been held in 2020 to replace a member who resigned or died in office during the 116th U.S. Congress:

State elections

Gubernatorial elections

23 5 1 7 20
Democrats Not Up Democrats Up PNP/R Up Republicans Up Republicans Not Up
States holding regularly-scheduled legislative and gubernatorial elections in 2020: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Governor and all legislative chambers  All legislative chambers  A portion of legislative chambers  None[e]
States holding regularly-scheduled legislative and gubernatorial elections in 2020:
  Governor and all legislative chambers
  All legislative chambers
  A portion of legislative chambers
  None[e]

Elections will be held for the governorships of 11 U.S. states and two U.S. territories. Special elections may be held for vacancies in the other states and territories, if required by respective state and territorial constitutions. Most elections will be for four-year terms, but the governors of New Hampshire and Vermont each serve two-year terms. Barring vacancies and party switching, Republicans will be defending seven seats, while Democrats will be defending six seats.

Legislative elections

Partisan control of state and territorial governments prior to the 2020 elections:  Democratic trifecta-no elections in 2020  Democratic trifecta up for election  Republican trifecta-no elections in 2020  Republican trifecta up for election  Divided government up for election  Divided government guaranteed after election  PNP trifecta up for election  Officially non-partisan legislature
Partisan control of state and territorial governments prior to the 2020 elections:
  Democratic trifecta-no elections in 2020
  Democratic trifecta up for election
  Republican trifecta-no elections in 2020
  Republican trifecta up for election
  Divided government up for election
  Divided government guaranteed after election
  PNP trifecta up for election
  Officially non-partisan legislature

Regularly-scheduled elections will be held in 86 of the 99 state legislative chambers in the United States; nationwide, regularly-scheduled elections will be held for 5,876 of the 7,383 legislative seats. Many legislative chambers will see all legislative seats up for election, but some legislative chambers that use staggered elections will hold elections for only a portion of the total seats in the chamber.[f] Although most states will hold regularly-scheduled elections for both legislative chambers, Alabama, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey and Virginia will not hold state legislative elections, and Michigan will hold elections only for the lower house.[e] Nebraska, the only state that does not have a bicameral state legislature, will hold elections for half of the seats in its lone legislative chamber.[16]

Following the 2019 elections, Democrats have 15 trifectas (control of the governor's office and both legislative chambers), Republicans have 20 trifectas, and 14 states have a divided government. Nebraska, which has an officially non-partisan legislature, is not included in this tally.[17][18] Nationwide, Republicans control approximately 60 percent of the legislative chambers and 52 percent of the legislative seats.[19]

Other state elections

In 2020, 82 state supreme court seats are up for election in 35 states. This constitutes 24 percent of all state supreme court seats in the country. Various other state courts will also hold elections in 2020. Various state executive positions are also up for election in 2020.

Referendums and ballot measures

During 2020, voters will consider a number of referendums, initiatives, ballot measures, and state constitutional amendments covering everything from Medicaid expansion to marijuana legalization to voting rights.[20] Since the death of George Floyd, at least 20 ballot measures in several states have added police-related measures. The states with these measures include California, Illinois, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington.[21]

  • Alabama, Colorado, and Florida voters will consider constitutional amendments narrowing the right to vote in any elections by replacing language in the state constitution stating "every citizen" has the right to vote with "only a citizen."
  • In Alaska, Ballot Measure 2 would replace partisan primaries with top-four open primaries and ranked choice voting general elections, among other election law changes. Massachusetts voters will also consider implementing ranked-choice voting on ballot Question 2.
  • In Arizona, Proposition 207 will be on the ballot to legalize recreational marijuana.
  • In California, Proposition 25, a veto referendum funded by the American Bail Coalition PAC, will decide whether to uphold SB10, which replaces cash bail with risk assessments for suspects who are detained in jail awaiting trial.
  • A veto referendum in Colorado will decide whether to allow the state to resume its suspended membership in the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact or retain its membership in the Electoral College in presidential elections.
  • Georgia will have two proposed constitutional amendments and one statewide referendum (HB 164, HR 1023, and HB 344). HB 164 aims to make funds collected from taxes and fees be used for their intended projects.[22] If passed, HR 1023 will give citizens the ability to challenge the state, local and other public entities if a law is unconstitutional and gain relief from the state by allowing sovereign immunity to be waived.[23] HB 344 will exempt affordable housing charities such as Habitat for Humanity from paying property taxes.[24]
  • Illinois voters will vote on the Illinois Fair Tax, a proposed state amendment which, if passed, that would change the state income tax system from a flat tax to a graduated income tax.[25][26]
  • A Maine veto referendum sought to overturn a new law which eliminates religious and philosophical exemptions from mandatory vaccinations for K-12 and college students and employees of healthcare facilities. It failed by a wide margin on the March primary ballot.
  • A Maryland ballot measure would approve sports betting in the state.
  • The legalization of medical marijuana will be on the ballot in Nebraska, Mississippi and South Dakota (recreational marijuana is also on the ballot in South Dakota), and a legislatively-referred ballot question in New Jersey will allow voters to decide on legalization of recreational cannabis.
  • Mississippi voters will also vote up or down a new state flag.
  • Missouri and Oklahoma voted in ballot initiatives to amend their state constitutions to expand Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.
  • Montana voters will vote on recreational marijuana via an initiative.
  • Constitutional amendments to remove penal exceptions from state constitutions will be on the ballot in Nebraska and Utah.
  • Puerto Rico will hold a non-binding referendum on statehood.[27]
  • Voters in Rhode Island will consider removing "and Providence Plantations" from the state's official name.[28]

Impact on redistricting

Following the 2020 United States Census, the state delegations to the U.S. House of Representatives will undergo reapportionment, and both the U.S. House of Representatives and the state legislatures will undergo redistricting. In states without redistricting commissions, the legislators and governors elected between 2017 and 2020 will draw the new congressional and state legislative districts that will take effect starting with the 2022 elections. State supreme courts can also have a significant effect on redistricting, as demonstrated in states such as Pennsylvania and Virginia. Thus the 2020 elections could have a significant impact on the 2020 United States redistricting cycle. Barring court orders or mid-decade redistricting, the districts drawn in the redistricting cycle will remain in place until the next round of redistricting begins in 2030.[29][30]

Territorial elections

The U.S. territories of American Samoa and Puerto Rico are holding gubernatorial and legislative elections in 2020, while Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands are holding legislative elections. Along with Washington, D.C., each territory is also holding elections for a non-voting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. All non-voting delegates serve two-year terms, with the exception of the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, a non-voting position with a four-year term. The five territories also took part in the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and the 2020 Republican Party presidential primaries.

Local elections

Mayoral elections

Since the beginning of 2020, various major cities have seen incumbent mayors re-elected, including Bakersfield, California (Karen Goh);[31] Chesapeake (David West),[32] Fairfax City (David Meyer),[32] Fredericksburg (Mary Katherine Greenlaw),[32] and Hampton, Virginia (Donnie Tuck);[32] Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Tom Barrett);[33] and Sacramento, California (Darrell Steinberg).[34] In Norfolk, Virginia, Mayor Kenny Alexander was unopposed in seeking reelection.[32] In Tulsa, Oklahoma, incumbent mayor G. T. Bynum earned reelection by winning an outright majority in the August primary.[35] An open mayoral seat was won in Fresno, California, by Jerry Dyer.[36]

Mayoral elections remain to be held in many cities, including:[37]

Other elections and referendums

Tribal elections

A number of Native American tribal governments held elections for tribal leadership in 2020. As with other elections in the country, the coronavirus pandemic disrupted many elections, delaying primaries and shifting some voting from in-person to postal.

The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation reelected President Bernadine Burnette;[43] the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians reelected Tribal Chairman Aaron A. Payment;[44] Oneida Nation of Wisconsin reelected Chairman Tehassi Hill;[45] the Bois Forte Band of Chippewa reelected Tribal Chair Cathy Chavers;[46] and incumbent Tribal Chief Donald (Doc) Slyter was unopposed in seeking reelection to lead the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians.[47] Stephanie Bryan, the first woman to serve as chair of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, also won reelection.[48] The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community elected Keith Anderson tribal chairman, replacing the retiring Charlie Vig.[49]

Kristopher Peters was elected Squaxin Island Tribe tribal council chairman, defeating incumbent Arnold Cooper,[50] and Joseph Tali Byrd defeated long-time Quapaw Nation Business Committee Chairman John Berrey.[51] Durell Cooper defeated incumbent Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Tribal Chairman Bobby Komardley.[52] Walter R. Echo-Hawk was unopposed in a special election for president of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Business Council[53] following the April 2020 recall of the prior president, James Whiteshirt.[54]

Three Minnesota Chippewa Tribe bands had candidates win more than 50% of the votes in June primaries, eliminating the need for a general election: Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe incumbent tribal chair Faron Jackson Sr.,[55] White Earth Nation incumbent chief executive Michael Fairbanks,[56] and, on the Grand Portage Indian Reservation, challenger Bobby Deschampe, who defeated incumbent tribal chair Beth Drost.[57]

Scheduled elections include:

Tribal referendums

Impact of COVID-19 pandemic

California Governor Gavin Newsom speaks about the decision to sign an executive order requiring mail in voting in the 2020 November election.

Starting in March 2020, elections across the United States were delayed and disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Numerous states delayed presidential primaries, while Alabama delayed the Republican primary Senatorial run-off and North Carolina and Mississippi delayed Republican primary run-off for congressional seats.[61] Iowa, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas all delayed municipal elections, and in New York City the special election for Queens borough president was cancelled.[62] The pandemic also led to the postponement of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, and both the 2020 Democratic National Convention and the 2020 Republican National Convention were held virtually.[63]

To help enforce social distancing, many states expanded absentee and vote-by-mail options for 2020 primary elections and the November general elections.[64] Several elections, including Democratic primaries in Alaska and Hawaiʻi, as well as the Maryland 7th congressional district special election, were conducted entirely with mail-in ballots only.[62]

Turnout

With many states easing rules on early voting in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 election saw an unprecedented rate of early voting.[65] By October 26, with eight days remaining until the election, the total early vote throughout the United States had eclipsed that of 2016.[66] Democrats disproportionately indicated their intention to vote by mail, while Republicans disproportionately indicated their intent to vote in person.[65]

Public perceptions and analysis

In a poll conducted in February 2020, 59% of respondents expressed confidence in the "honesty of U.S. elections".[67] In an August 2020 survey, 49% of respondents said that they expect voting to be "difficult", up from 15% in 2018; 75% of Republicans, but less than half of Democrats were confident that the elections "will be conducted fairly and accurately".[68] In a October 2020 survey, 47% of respondents disagreed with the statement that the election "is likely to be fair and honest", 51% would not "generally agree on who is the legitimately elected president of the United States";[69] 56% said that they expect "an increase in violence as a result of the election".[69] 49% of college students polled in September 2020 said that the elections won't be "fair and open", 55% that "it will not be administered well", and 81% that "special interest groups have more influence over election outcomes than voters".[70]

According to an October 2020 poll, eight out of ten Americans consider misinformation a "major problem",[71] Biden supporters were more likely than Trump supporters to trust the news media and their candidate's messaging.[71][72]

Historian Timothy Snyder, an expert on authoritarianism, said that "it's important not to talk about this as just an election. It's an election surrounded by the authoritarian language of a coup d'etat. [...] [Trump] seems pretty sure he won't win the election, [but] he doesn't want to leave office." According to Snyder, in order to overcome Trump's "authoritarian's instinct", the opposition "has to win the election and it has to win the aftermath of the election."[73]

Table of state, territorial, and federal results

This table shows the partisan results of president, congressional, gubernatorial, and state legislative races held in each state and territory in 2020. Note that not all states and territories hold gubernatorial, state legislative, and U.S. Senate elections in 2018. The five territories and Washington, D.C., do not elect members of the U.S. Senate, and the territories do not take part in presidential elections; instead they each elect one non-voting member of the House. Nebraska's unicameral legislature and the governorship and legislature of American Samoa are officially non-partisan. In the table, offices/legislatures that are not up for election in 2020 are already filled in for the "after 2020 elections" section, although vacancies or party switching could potentially lead to a flip in partisan control.

Subdivision and PVI[74] Before 2020 elections[75] After 2020 elections
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House Pres.[g] Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
 
Alabama R+14 Rep Rep Split Rep 6–1 Rep Rep
Alaska R+9 Rep Split Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Arizona R+5 Rep Rep Split Dem 5–4 Rep
Arkansas R+15 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–0 Rep
California D+12 Dem Dem Dem Dem 46–7 Dem Dem
Colorado D+1 Dem Dem Split Dem 4–3 Dem
Connecticut D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 5–0 Dem Dem
Delaware D+6 Dem Dem Dem Dem 1–0
Florida R+2 Rep Rep Rep Rep 14–13 Rep Rep
Georgia R+5 Rep Rep Rep Rep 9–5 Rep
Hawaii D+18 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem Dem
Idaho R+19 Rep Rep Rep Rep 2–0 Rep
Illinois D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 13–5 Dem
Indiana R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Iowa R+3 Rep Rep Rep Dem 3–1 Rep
Kansas R+13 Dem Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Dem
Kentucky R+15 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem
Louisiana R+11 Dem Rep Rep Rep 5–1 Dem Rep
Maine D+3 Dem Dem Split R/I[h] Dem 2–0 Dem
Maryland D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 7–1 Rep Dem Dem
Massachusetts D+12 Rep Dem Dem Dem 9–0 Rep
Michigan D+1 Dem Rep Dem Dem 7–6–1 Dem
Minnesota D+1 Dem Split Dem Dem 5–3 Dem
Mississippi R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep Rep
Missouri R+9 Rep Rep Rep Rep 6–2 Rep
Montana R+11 Dem Rep Split Rep 1–0
Nebraska R+14 Rep NP Rep Rep 3–0 Rep NP
Nevada D+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–1 Dem Dem
New Hampshire Even Rep Dem Dem Dem 2–0
New Jersey D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 10–2 Dem Dem
New Mexico D+3 Dem Dem Dem Dem 3–0 Dem
New York D+11 Dem Dem Dem Dem 21–6 Dem Dem
North Carolina R+3 Dem Rep Rep Rep 9–3
North Dakota R+17 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Ohio R+3 Rep Rep Split Rep 12–4 Rep Split
Oklahoma R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 4–1 Rep
Oregon D+5 Dem Dem Dem Dem 4–1 Dem
Pennsylvania Even Dem Rep Split Split 9–9 Dem Split
Rhode Island D+10 Dem Dem Dem Dem 2–0 Dem
South Carolina R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 5–2 Rep
South Dakota R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
Tennessee R+14 Rep Rep Rep Rep 7–2 Rep
Texas R+8 Rep Rep Rep Rep 23–13 Rep
Utah R+20 Rep Rep Rep Rep 3–1 Rep
Vermont D+15 Rep Dem Split D/I[i] Dem 1–0 Split D/I[i]
Virginia D+1 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–4 Dem Dem
Washington D+7 Dem Dem Dem Dem 7–3 Dem
West Virginia R+20 Rep Rep Split Rep 3–0
Wisconsin Even Dem Rep Split Rep 5–3 Dem Split
Wyoming R+25 Rep Rep Rep Rep 1–0 Rep
United States Even Rep 26–24 Rep 29–19 Rep 53–47[j] Dem 232–198
Washington, D.C. D+43 Dem[k] Dem[k] N/A Dem Dem N/A
American Samoa N/A NP/D[l] NP Rep N/A NP NP
Guam Dem Dem Dem Dem
N. Mariana Islands Rep Rep Ind[m] Rep
Puerto Rico PNP/R[n] PNP PNP/R[o]
U.S. Virgin Islands Dem Dem Dem Dem
Subdivision PVI Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House President Governor State leg. U.S. Senate U.S. House
Subdivision and PVI Before 2020 elections After 2020 elections

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The exact number of Democratic seats will depend on the results of vacancies and special elections that occur prior to November 2020.
  2. ^ In a contingent election, the House of Representatives can choose from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state delegation of the House of Representatives receives one vote. For example, the state delegation of Alabama (consisting of seven representatives) and the state delegation of Alaska (consisting of one representative) each collectively receive one vote.
  3. ^ 2 Independents not up
  4. ^ The results of one 2018 race, the 2018 North Carolina's 9th congressional district election, were declared void due to voting irregularities.
  5. ^ a b Some or all of the legislative chambers not holding regularly-scheduled elections in 2020 may nonetheless hold special elections in 2020.
  6. ^ The upper houses of Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming will hold elections for half of the seats in the chamber. The North Dakota House of Representatives is the only lower house in which only half of the seats are up for election. The Illinois Senate will hold elections for one-third of the seats in the chamber.[16]
  7. ^ This column reflects the individual who won a plurality of the state's popular vote in the 2020 presidential election.
  8. ^ One of Maine's senators, Susan Collins, is a Republican. The other senator from Maine, Angus King, is an independent who has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2013.
  9. ^ a b One of Vermont's senators, Patrick Leahy, is a Democrat. The other senator from Vermont, Bernie Sanders, was elected as an independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2007.
  10. ^ The Democratic Senate caucus currently consists of 45 Democrats and two independents.
  11. ^ a b Washington, D.C., does not elect a governor or state legislature, but it does elect a mayor and a city council.
  12. ^ Although elections for governor of American Samoa are non-partisan, Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga has affiliated with the Democratic Party at the national level since re-election in 2016.
  13. ^ The Northern Mariana Islands' delegate to Congress, Gregorio Sablan, was elected as an Independent and has caucused with the Democrats since taking office in 2009.
  14. ^ Puerto Rican Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced, who became governor after Pedro Pierluisi's succession of Ricardo Rosselló was deemed unconstitutional, is as a member of the Puerto Rican New Progressive Party, but affiliates with the Republican Party at the national level.
  15. ^ Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner, Jenniffer González, was elected as a member of the New Progressive Party and has caucused with the Republicans since taking office in 2017.

References

  1. ^ Isenstadt, Alex (February 16, 2020). "Trump drives massive turnout in primaries despite token opposition". Politico.
  2. ^ Borenstein, Seth; Colvin, Jill (March 17, 2020). "Trump clinches GOP nomination with Tuesday primary wins". AP.
  3. ^ Morin, Rebecca (June 5, 2020). "Joe Biden passes delegate threshold to clinch Democratic presidential nomination". USA Today.
  4. ^ Leatherby, Lauren; Almukhtar, Sarah (June 9, 2020). "Democratic Delegate Count and Primary Election Results 2020". The New York Times.
  5. ^ Neumann, Sean (July 31, 2020). "Everything We Know About the Status of Kanye West's Unlikely 2020 Campaign". People.
  6. ^ O'Keefe, Ed; Kaplan, Rebecca (October 28, 2019). "Katie Hill, California congresswoman, resigns amid allegations of affairs with staff". New York: CBS News. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  7. ^ "California's 25th Congressional District, 2020 - Ballotpedia". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  8. ^ Barker, Jeff (October 17, 2019). "U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, longtime advocate for Baltimore and civil rights and key figure in Trump impeachment inquiry, dies at 68". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. Retrieved October 17, 2019.
  9. ^ "Maryland's 7th Congressional District - Ballotpedia". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  10. ^ McKinley, Jesse (June 24, 2020). "Republicans Retain House Seat in Special Election in Western N.Y." The New York Times.
  11. ^ Merle, Renae; DeBonis, Mike (September 30, 2019). "Republican Rep. Chris Collins resigns House seat ahead of guilty plea to insider-trading charges". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  12. ^ "New York's 27th Congressional District - Ballotpedia". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  13. ^ Brufke, Juliegrace (August 26, 2019). "GOP Rep. Sean Duffy resigning from Congress". The Hill. Washington, D.C. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  14. ^ Vetterkind, Riley (August 27, 2019). "Congressman Sean Duffy to resign in September, cites family reasons". Wisconsin State Journal. Madison, Wisconsin. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  15. ^ "Wisconsin's 7th Congressional District - Ballotpedia". Ballotpedia. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  16. ^ a b "2020 Legislative Races by State and Legislative Chamber". National Conference of State Legislatures. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  17. ^ Quinton, Sophie; Povich, Elaine S. (November 9, 2018). "So Much Changed in Statehouses This Week. Here's What It All Means". Stateline. The Pew Charitable Trusts.
  18. ^ Rabinowitz, Kate; Still, Ashlyn. "Democrats are dominating state-level races". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 17, 2019.
  19. ^ Panetta, Grace (April 16, 2020). "The coronavirus crisis is drastically changing the battle for state legislatures and could completely reshape who controls Congress". Business Insider.
  20. ^ "2020 ballot measures". Ballotpedia. August 2, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  21. ^ "Local police-related ballot measures following the killing of and protests about George Floyd". Ballotpedia. Retrieved October 27, 2020.
  22. ^ "Georgia Dedicating Tax and Fee Revenue Amendment (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  23. ^ "Georgia Allow Residents to Seek Declaratory Relief from Certain Laws Amendment (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  24. ^ "Georgia Property Tax Exemption for Certain Charities Measure (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  25. ^ "Illinois Fair Tax", Wikipedia, September 7, 2020, retrieved September 9, 2020
  26. ^ staff, Sun-Times (February 19, 2020). "Everything you need to know about the proposed graduated income tax". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  27. ^ Coto, Danica (May 16, 2020). "Puerto Rico to hold statehood referendum amid disillusion". ABC News.
  28. ^ "Referendum on 'Providence Plantations' added to November ballot". Providence, Rhode Island: WJAR-TV. July 17, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  29. ^ Sarlin, Benjy (August 26, 2014). "Forget 2016: Democrats already have a plan for 2020". MSNBC. Retrieved October 30, 2015.
  30. ^ Lieb, David A. (May 26, 2020). "Parties Target Control of State Legislatures, Redistricting". U.S. News and World Report.
  31. ^ Mayer, Steven (March 4, 2020). "Goh secures victory in mayor's race". The Californian. Bakersfield, California. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  32. ^ a b c d e Feld, Lowell (May 20, 2020). "Results from "Virginia's First 'Social Distancing' Election"". Blue Virginia.
  33. ^ Dirr, Alison (April 13, 2020). "Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett easily wins reelection in race against Lena Taylor". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  34. ^ Clift, Theresa (March 3, 2020). "Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg easily re-elected to second term". The Sacramento Bee. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  35. ^ reports, Staff. "Election results: G.T. Bynum wins a second term as the Tulsa mayor; 3 city councilors win, 3 go to runoff". Tulsa World. Retrieved August 30, 2020.
  36. ^ Sheehan, Tim (March 11, 2020). "Jerry Dyer will be Fresno's next mayor". The Fresno Bee. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  37. ^ "Partisanship in United States municipal elections (2020)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved February 24, 2020.
  38. ^ Richman, Talia; Opilo, Emily (June 9, 2020). "Baltimore's Democratic voters nominate Scott for mayor in narrow primary victory over former officeholder Dixon". The Baltimore Sun. Baltimore, Maryland. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  39. ^ Hagen, Ryan (March 4, 2020). "Riverside mayoral matchup appears set for November election". The Press-Enterprise. Riverside, California. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  40. ^ Rosario, Richy (April 5, 2018). "Carmen Yulin Cruz, Mayor Of San Juan, Reportedly Eyes Governor Seat In Puerto Rico". Vibe. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  41. ^ Gross, Kristi (March 4, 2020). "Stockton mayoral race headed for November runoff". Sacramento, California: KXTL-TV. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  42. ^ Stelmakowich, Angela (September 4, 2020). "Voters in Washington, D.C. seem poised to green light effort to decriminalize psychedelics". Regina Leader-Post. Regina, Saskatchewan. Retrieved September 4, 2020.
  43. ^ "President Burnette: Ft. McDowell election results". The Fountain Hills Times. Fountain Hills, Arizona. January 22, 2020. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  44. ^ "Incumbents returned to office in Sault Tribe election" (PDF). Win Awenen Nisitotung. Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. July 1, 2020. p. 1. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  45. ^ a b "Oneida Nation general election results in, Tehassi Hill re-elected as Chairman". Green Bay, Wisconsin: WBAY-TV. July 26, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  46. ^ "2020 General Election Results" (PDF). Nett Lake, Minnesota: Bois Forte General Election Board. August 18, 2020. Retrieved September 2, 2002.
  47. ^ "Election Results for the Tribal Council Positions" (PDF). CLUSI Election Board. April 11, 2020. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  48. ^ "Facebook". The Atmore Advance. August 2, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  49. ^ Adler, Erin (January 22, 2020). "Shakopee tribe elects Anderson as chairman to replace Vig". Star Tribune. Minneapolis, Minnesota. Retrieved February 17, 2020.
  50. ^ "Official Election Results". Squaxin Island Tribe Election Committee. July 25, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  51. ^ Ellis, Dale (August 2, 2020). "New leader elected to Quapaw Nation". Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Little Rock, Arkansas. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  52. ^ "Apache Tribe of Oklahoma election results". The Lawton Constitution. Lawton, Oklahoma. June 29, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  53. ^ "Certification of 2020 Pawnee Business Council Special Election". Pawnee Nation Election Commission. June 29, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  54. ^ "2020 Re-Call Election # 2 OFFICIAL Result". Pawnee Nation Election Commission. April 16, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  55. ^ Duoos, Kayla (June 10, 2020). "Official Certified 2020 Primary Election Results". Leech Lake News. Cass Lake, Minnesota. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  56. ^ Bowe, Nathan (June 10, 2020). "White Earth Chairman Fairbanks re-elected; Tibbetts and Jackson to face off for council seat". Detroit Lakes Tribune. Detroit Lakes, Minnesota. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  57. ^ Larsen, Brian (June 12, 2020). "Robert (Bobby) Deschampe To Be The New Grand Portage Tribal Council Chairperson". The Cook County News Herald. Grand Marais, Minnesota. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  58. ^ "Notice of 2020 Crow Tribe Executive Branch Elections Filing Deadline for Candidates for Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary, and Vice Secretary". Crow Nation Legislative Branch. July 13, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  59. ^ "Tribal Council Representatives". Retrieved January 21, 2020.
  60. ^ Gross, Stephen (March 11, 2020). "Oglala Sioux Tribe Approves Medical, Recreational Marijuana". U.S. News & World Report. Washington, D.C. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  61. ^ Corasaniti, Nick; Saul, Stephanie (March 20, 2020). "2020 Democratic Primary Election: Voting Postponed in 7 States Because of Virus". The New York Times. New York City, New York. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  62. ^ a b "Political responses to the coronavirus pandemic, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  63. ^ Orr, Gabby; Thompson, Alex (August 18, 2020). "Battle of the virtual conventions: How the GOP team is studying the Democrats' show". Politico.
  64. ^ Fessler, Pam (March 24, 2020). "As Coronavirus Delays Primary Season, States Weigh Expanding Absentee Voting". Morning Edition. Washington, D.C.: NPR. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  65. ^ a b Mayes, Brittany Renee; Rabinowitz, Kate (October 22, 2020). "Early-voting numbers: U.S. has hit record early turnout". Washington Post.
  66. ^ Smith, Allan (October 26, 2020). "Early voting could hit record-smashing 100 million by Election Day". NBC News.
  67. ^ "Faith in Elections in Relatively Short Supply in U.S." Gallup. Retrieved September 27, 2020.
  68. ^ Doherty, Carroll (October 7, 2020). "Voters anxiously approach an unusual election – and its potentially uncertain aftermath". Fact Tank. Pew Research Center. Retrieved October 26, 2020.
  69. ^ a b King, Ledyard (October 7, 2020). "'The country's lost its mind': Polls warning of civil war, violence shows deep partisan chasm over election". USA Today. Retrieved October 26, 2020.
  70. ^ "College Students, Voting and the COVID-19 Election". College Pulse & Knight Foundation. September 2020. Retrieved September 27, 2020.
  71. ^ a b Klepper, David (October 21, 2020). "AP-NORC/USAFacts poll: Many in US distrust campaign info". AP news. Retrieved October 26, 2020.
  72. ^ Mitchell, Amy; Jurkowitz, Mark; Oliphant, J. Baxter; Shearer, Elisa (October 19, 2020). "Interest in election news increases, with most Americans feeling worn out by the volume of coverage". Pew Research Center. Retrieved October 26, 2020.
  73. ^ Milbank, Dana (September 25, 2020). "This is not a drill. The Reichstag is burning". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  74. ^ Coleman, Miles. "2016 State PVI Changes". Decision Desk HQ. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  75. ^ "2020 State & Legislative Partisan Composition" (PDF). National Conference of State Legislatures. August 1, 2020.

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 27 October 2020, at 16:15
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.