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2020 Washington gubernatorial election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 Washington gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Jay Inslee official portrait 2020 (cropped).jpg
Loren Culp.png
Nominee Jay Inslee Loren Culp
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,294,243 1,749,066
Percentage 56.6% 43.1%

2020 Washington gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Inslee:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%
Culp:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Governor before election

Jay Inslee
Democratic

Elected Governor

Jay Inslee
Democratic

The 2020 Washington gubernatorial election was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the governor of Washington, concurrently with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as elections to the United States Senate, elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. The top-two primary was held on August 4. Incumbent Jay Inslee, the Democratic candidate, defeated Loren Culp, the Republican candidate.

As Washington does not have gubernatorial term limits, incumbent Democratic Governor Jay Inslee was eligible to run for a third term.[1] Inslee initially launched a campaign for President of the United States in the 2020 election. When he dropped out of that race in August 2019 due to low polling numbers,[2] he announced he would seek a third term as governor.[3] Several other Democratic political figures considered entering the race if Inslee did not run, including Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, but ultimately, no other major Democrats entered the race.[4]

Republican Loren Culp placed second in the top-two primary and competed against Inslee in the general election on November 3. Inslee won re-election to a third term and defeated Culp in the election by a 13.44% margin. Nonetheless, Culp refused to concede and filed a lawsuit against Republican Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman five weeks after the election.[5] Culp's actions drew criticism and were compared to Donald Trump's refusal to concede the 2020 U.S. presidential election.[6]

Background

Washington has not had a Republican governor since John Spellman left office in 1985, the longest streak of Democratic leadership of any state in the country and the third longest streak of one-party leadership after South Dakota (which has not had a Democratic governor since Harvey L. Wollman left office in 1979) and Utah (which has not had a Democratic governor since Scott M. Matheson left office nine days prior to Spellman in 1985).[7][8][9] Incumbent Governor Jay Inslee, who previously served in the U.S. House, was first elected to the governorship in the 2012 election and won reelection in 2016.

When Inslee announced his candidacy for president, several political figures expressed interest in running for Governor if Inslee won the Democratic primaries. These included Attorney General Bob Ferguson, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz and King County executive Dow Constantine.[10] They stated they would only run if Inslee was not, avoiding a primary challenge.[11][12]

Several Republican politicians announced their own campaigns to challenge Inslee, including businessman Anton Sakharov, Republic police chief Loren Culp, and state senator Phil Fortunato.[13][14][15] However, speculated candidates such as former U.S. Representative Dave Reichert, former Seattle Port Commissioner and 2016 gubernatorial nominee Bill Bryant, Pierce County executive and former State Senator Bruce Dammeier, and Washington House minority Leader J. T. Wilcox all declined to be candidates, leaving no prominent Republicans to challenge Inslee, which was seen as a necessary prerequisite to mount a formidable challenge to him.

Primary election

Washington State is one of few states that holds a top-two primary, meaning that all candidates are listed on the same ballot regardless of party affiliation, and the top two move on to the general election. Most states have party primaries.

Democratic candidates

Advanced to the general election

Declined

Republican candidates

Advanced to the general election

Eliminated in the primary

Declined

Green Party

Eliminated in the primary

Independents

Eliminated in the primary

  • Cregan Newhouse, City of Seattle Consumer Protection Division acting manager and former public television director[32]

Withdrew

  • Asa Palagi, U.S. Army officer and businessman[33][34]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jay
Inslee (D)
Tim
Eyman (R)
Loren
Culp (R)
Phil
Fortunato (R)
Joshua
Freed (R)
Anton
Sakharov (R)
Raul
Garcia (R)
Other /
Undecided
SurveyUSA July 22–27, 2020 513 (LV) ± 5.4% 55% 8% 9% 3% 6% 4% 16%[b]
Crosscut/Elway July 11–15, 2020 402 (RV) ± 5.0% 46% 4% 14% 2% 5% 6% 25%[c]
SurveyUSA May 16–19, 2020 650 (LV) ± 5.6% 50% 8% 4% 6% 6% 1% 2% 23%[d]
SurveyUSA January 26–28, 2020 1,103 (RV) ± 3.9% 39% 11% 5% 4% 4% 3% 34%[e]
Crosscut/Elway December 26–29, 2019 405 (RV) ± 5% 46% 7%[f] 4% 4% 5% 34%[g]

Results

Results by county: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Inslee—70–80%   Inslee—60–70%   Inslee—50–60%   Inslee—40–50%   Inslee—30–40%   Culp—30–40%   Culp—40–50%   Culp—50–60%   Garcia—30–40%
Results by county:
  Inslee—70–80%
  Inslee—60–70%
  Inslee—50–60%
  Inslee—40–50%
  Inslee—30–40%
  Culp—30–40%
  Culp—40–50%
  Culp—50–60%
  Garcia—30–40%
Top-two primary election results[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jay Inslee (incumbent) 1,247,916 50.14%
Republican Loren Culp 433,238 17.41%
Republican Joshua Freed 222,553 8.94%
Republican Tim Eyman 159,495 6.41%
Republican Raul Garcia 135,045 5.43%
Republican Phil Fortunato 99,265 3.99%
Democratic Don L. Rivers 25,601 1.03%
Trump Republican Party Leon Aaron Lawson 23,073 0.93%
Green Liz Hallock 21,537 0.87%
Democratic Cairo D'Almeida 14,657 0.59%
Trump Republican Party Anton Sakharov 13,935 0.56%
Pre2016 Republican Party Nate Herzog 11,303 0.45%
Democratic Gene Hart 10,605 0.43%
Democratic Omari Tahir Garrett 8,751 0.35%
Unaffiliated Party Ryan Ryals 6,264 0.25%
Socialist Workers Henry Clay Dennison 5,970 0.24%
Trump Republican Party Goodspaceguy 5,646 0.23%
Republican Richard L. Carpenter 4,962 0.2%
Independent Elaina J. Gonzales 4,772 0.19%
Republican Matthew Murray 4,489 0.18%
Independent Thor Amundson 3,638 0.15%
Republican Bill Hirt 2,854 0.11%
Republican Martin L. Wheeler 2,686 0.11%
Republican Ian Gonzales 2,537 0.1%
New-Liberty Party Joshua Wolf 2,315 0.09%
No Party Preference Cregan M. Newhouse 2,291 0.09%
No Party Preference Brian R. Weed 2,178 0.09%
StandupAmerica Party Alex Tsimerman 1,721 0.07%
Republican Tylor Grow 1,509 0.06%
Independent Dylan B. Nails 1,470 0.06%
Independent Craig Campbell 1,178 0.05%
American Patriot Party William Miller 1,148 0.05%
No Party Preference Cameron M. Vessey 718 0.03%
Propertarianist Party Winston Wilkes 702 0.03%
Fifth Republic Party David W. Blomstrom 519 0.02%
Cascadia Labour Party David Voltz 480 0.02%
Write-in 1,938 0.08%
Total votes 2,488,959 100%

General election

Debates

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[36] Safe D October 23, 2020
Inside Elections[37] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[38] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[39] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[40] Safe D October 28, 2020
RCP[41] Safe D November 2, 2020
270towin[42] Safe D November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jay
Inslee (D)
Loren
Culp (R)
Undecided
Swayable October 23 – November 1, 2020 474 (LV) ± 6% 59% 41%
Public Policy Polling (D) October 14–15, 2020 615 (LV) ± 4% 56% 40% 4%
SurveyUSA October 8–10, 2020 591 (LV) ± 5.2% 54% 40% 6%
Strategies 360 September 8–14, 2020 501 (RV) ± 4.4% 53% 37% 9%[i]
SurveyUSA July 22–27, 2020 534 (LV) ± 5.2% 61% 32% 7%
SurveyUSA May 16–19, 2020 530 (LV) ± 5.4% 56% 31% 13%

Results

The election was clear and decisive, with incumbent Jay Inslee winning re-election over Loren Culp by over 13 points. This marked the largest margin of victory in a Washington gubernatorial race since Gary Locke won reelection in 2000. Inslee's victory was fueled by getting over 74% of the vote in King County, which was the highest a Democrat got there in state history. King County, home to Seattle, has about a third of the state's voters.[43][44] In addition, this was the first time since 2000 that a Democrat won a county in Eastern Washington with Inslee winning Whitman County.[45] In spite of the large margin of victory, Culp refused to concede his loss and has given no concession speech, while making claims of irregularities which Republican Secretary of State Kim Wyman characterized as "unsubstantiated".[46]

Despite this, Culp still ran ahead of the top-ticket presidential candidate, Donald Trump, by about 4 points.

2020 Washington gubernatorial election[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jay Inslee (incumbent) 2,294,243 56.56% +2.31%
Republican Loren Culp 1,749,066 43.12% -2.37%
Write-in 13,145 0.32% +0.06%
Total votes 4,056,454 100.00%
Turnout 4,116,894 84.14%
Registered electors 4,892,871
Democratic hold

Counties that flipped from Republican to Democratic

By congressional district

Inslee won 6 of 10 congressional districts with the remaining 4 going to Culp.[48]

District Culp Inslee Representative
1st 43% 57% Suzan DelBene
2nd 40% 60% Rick Larsen
3rd 54% 46% Jaime Herrera Beutler
4th 62% 38% Dan Newhouse
5th 57% 43% Cathy McMorris Rodgers
6th 44% 56% Derek Kilmer
7th 15% 85% Pramila Jayapal
8th 51% 49% Kim Schrier
9th 27% 73% Adam Smith
10th 46% 54% Denny Heck

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ "Some other candidate" with 4%; Undecided with 12%
  3. ^ "Other" with 1%; Undecided with 24%
  4. ^ Undecided with 23%
  5. ^ Undecided with 34%
  6. ^ Listed as an independent.
  7. ^ Undecided with 34%
  8. ^ Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  9. ^ Includes "Refused"

References

  1. ^ Merica, Dan (March 1, 2019). "Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announces 2020 presidential bid". Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  2. ^ "Was Jay Inslee's presidential campaign a failure?". The Aggie. October 21, 2019. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  3. ^ CNN, Dan Merica and Paul LeBlanc (August 22, 2019). "Washington Gov. Jay Inslee drops out of presidential race". CNN. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  4. ^ Gutman, David (August 22, 2019). "With Inslee running again for governor, leading Washington state Democrats put their ambitions on hold". The Seattle Times. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  5. ^ Craighead, Callie (December 11, 2020). "Refusing to concede lost election, Washington gubernatorial candidate Loren Culp sues Sec. of State". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved December 19, 2020.
  6. ^ Bowman, Nick (November 9, 2020). "Opinion: Loren Culp, Trump show a refusal to accept reality in both Washingtons". MyNorthwest.com. Bonneville International. Retrieved November 10, 2020.
  7. ^ Wood, Benjamin (July 19, 2019). "Zachary Moses, a Democratic candidate for governor, wants to break up Republican control of Utah and build a space port". Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  8. ^ Scott, Dylan (November 7, 2018). "Kristi Noem elected first woman governor of South Dakota". Vox. Retrieved August 26, 2019.
  9. ^ Camden, Jim (January 16, 2018). "John Spellman, Washington's last Republican governor, dies". The Spokesman-Review. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  10. ^ "King County Executive Dow Constantine not ruling out run for governor". KING 5 News. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  11. ^ a b Axelrod, Tal (August 22, 2019). "Inslee to announce bid for third term as Washington governor: report". The Hill. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  12. ^ a b Smay, Ian (August 22, 2019). "Bob Ferguson announces decision to run for another term as Washington Attorney General". KING 5 News. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  13. ^ "Inslee, Culp advance to general election in Washington governor's race". Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  14. ^ a b Robinson, Erin (July 26, 2019). "Republic police chief announces run for governor". KXLY. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  15. ^ a b "GOP State Senator Phil Fortunato gears up for governor run". The Seattle Times. August 5, 2019. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  16. ^ @JayInslee (August 22, 2019). "That's why, today, I'm announcing my intention to run for a third term as Washington's governor. Join me" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  17. ^ "King County Executive Dow Constantine not ruling out run for governor". KING. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  18. ^ a b c Gutman, David (August 22, 2019). "With Inslee running again for governor, leading Washington state Democrats put their ambitions on hold". The Seattle Times. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  19. ^ Brunner, Jim (February 13, 2020). "Tim Eyman says he'll run for governor as Republican, not independent". The Seattle Times. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  20. ^ Brunner, Jim (September 6, 2019). "Former Bothell Mayor Joshua Freed to run for governor, citing homelessness crisis". The Seattle Times. Retrieved September 6, 2019.
  21. ^ Garcia, Raul (May 15, 2020). "Raul Garcia for WA State Governor". Raul Garcia. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  22. ^ Drew, James (May 15, 2020). "Heres who's running statewide in the Aug. 4 primary election (and in a hot congressional race)". The News Tribune. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  23. ^ Brunner, Jim (September 1, 2019). "As Washington state Republicans struggle to field 2020 candidates, Reichert eyes run for governor". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 3, 2019.
  24. ^ Brunner, Jim (June 24, 2019). "Who will Washington's next governor be? Uncertainty over Inslee creates pileup of politicians, domino effects down ballot". The Seattle Times. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  25. ^ a b c "With Jay Inslee running for president, here's who might lead WA next". Crosscut.com. Retrieved April 6, 2019.
  26. ^ "As Governor Inslee eyes White House, who could take his place in 2020?". Q13 FOX News. March 1, 2019. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  27. ^ Radio, iFiberone News. "2018 CANDIDATE CONVERSATION - DREW MacEWEN". iFIBER ONE News Radio. Retrieved October 21, 2018.
  28. ^ "Dori: Why I might just run for governor after all". Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  29. ^ Connelly, Joel (September 3, 2019). "Former U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert says he won't run for Washington governor -- yet again". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved September 3, 2019.
  30. ^ "Liz Hallock – A New Deal for Washington". Retrieved January 23, 2020.
  31. ^ Talamo, Lex (February 17, 2020). "Liz Hallock running for Washington governor as a Green Party candidate". Yakima Herald-Republic. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  32. ^ "Cregan Newhouse for Governor". Retrieved August 11, 2020.
  33. ^ "Asa Palagi, 2020".
  34. ^ "Independent Candidate Asa Palagi Withdraws From Washington State's Gubernatorial Race and Slams Government Shutdowns - Press Release - Digital Journal". www.digitaljournal.com. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  35. ^ "August 4, 2020 Primary Results - Governor". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved October 17, 2020.
  36. ^ "2020 Governor Race Ratings for October 23, 2020". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  37. ^ "2020 Gubernatorial Ratings". insideelections.com. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  38. ^ "2020 Gubernatorial race ratings". Larry J. Sabato's Crystal Ball. November 2, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  39. ^ "We rated every gubernatorial race in 2020. Here's who we think will win". Politico. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  40. ^ "2020 Governor Race Ratings". Daily Kos. June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  41. ^ "2020 Governor Races". RealClearPolitics. June 13, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  42. ^ "2020 Gubernatorial Elections Map". 270towin.
  43. ^ Brunner, Jim (November 10, 2020). "Republican Loren Culp lost King County by the worst margin in at least four decades in Washington governor's race". The Seattle Times. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  44. ^ "Election Results and Voters' Pamphlets". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  45. ^ Leadingham, Scott (November 19, 2020). "Incumbent's Advantage: Why Whitman County Votes For Biden And Inslee, But GOP For Congress". Northwest Public Broadcasting. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  46. ^ Brunner, Jim (November 21, 2020). "Loren Culp, refusing to concede Washington gubernatorial race, turns on top Republicans". The Seattle Times.
  47. ^ "November 3, 2020 General Election Results". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  48. ^ Results. sos.wa.gov (Report). Archived from the original (PDF) on November 24, 2020.

External links

Official campaign websites
This page was last edited on 11 April 2021, at 20:33
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