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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 13 North Carolina seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 10 3
Seats won 8 5
Seat change Decrease 2 Increase 2
Popular vote 2,631,336 2,660,535
Percentage 49.41% 49.96%
Swing Decrease 0.98% Increase 1.61%

NorthCarolina2020HouseofRepsElection.svg

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina were held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 13 U.S. Representatives from the state of North Carolina, one from each of the state's 13 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

Following a 2019 court order,[1] the North Carolina General Assembly passed a bill with new Congressional districts for the 2020 elections. Among other changes, the 2nd and 6th districts were drawn to be more urban. Those changes led the two incumbents in these districts, George Holding and Mark Walker, respectively, to retire. Both were Republicans, and Democrats won the newly redrawn districts. One other seat was open, as former Rep. Mark Meadows had resigned to become White House Chief of Staff, but a fellow Republican held that seat for the party. Incumbents won all elections in which they ran, with the 8th district (Richard Hudson) seat having the closest margin of victory.[2]

Despite Democrats winning the larger vote count in North Carolina, Republicans won majority of seats. However this number is skewed due to no Republican appearing on the ballot in North Carolina's 12th.

Results summary

Statewide

Party Candi-
dates
Votes Seats
No. % No. +/– %
Republican Party 12 2,631,336 49.413% 8 Decrease2 61.54%
Democratic Party 13 2,660,535 49.961% 5 Increase2 38.76%
Libertarian Party 2 19,596 0.368% 0 Steady 0.00%
Constitution Party 1 7,555 0.142% 0 Steady 0.00%
Green Party 1 5,503 0.103% 0 Steady 0.00%
Write-in 1 720 0.014% 0 Steady 0.00%
Total 30 5,325,245 100.00% 13 Steady 100.00%
Popular vote
Democratic
49.961%
Republican
49.413%
Libertarian
0.368%
Constitution
0.142%
Green
0.103%
Write-in
0.014%
House seats
Republican
61.54%
Democratic
38.76%

District

Results of the 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina by district:

District Republican Democratic Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 159,748 45.82% 188,870 54.18% 0 0.00% 348,618 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 2 172,544 34.83% 311,887 62.96% 10,914 2.20% 495,345 100.00% Democratic Gain
District 3 229,800 63.38% 132,752 36.62% 0 0.00% 362,552 100.00% Republican Hold
District 4 161,298 32.67% 332,421 67.33% 0 0.00% 493,719 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 5 257,843 66.93% 119,846 31.11% 7,555 1.96% 385,244 100.00% Republican Hold
District 6 153,598 37.73% 253,531 62.27% 0 0.00% 407,129 100.00% Democratic Gain
District 7 272,443 60.25% 179,045 39.59% 720 0.16% 452,208 100.00% Republican Hold
District 8 202,774 53.28% 177,781 46.72% 0 0.00% 380,555 100.00% Republican Hold
District 9 224,661 55.59% 179,463 44.41% 0 0.00% 404,124 100.00% Republican Hold
District 10 284,095 68.91% 128,189 31.09% 0 0.00% 412,284 100.00% Republican Hold
District 11 245,351 54.50% 190,609 42.34% 14,185 3.15% 450,145 100.00% Republican Hold
District 12 0 0.00% 341,457 100.00% 0 0.00% 341,457 100.00% Democratic Hold
District 13 267,181 68.18% 124,684 31.82% 0 0.00% 391,865 100.00% Republican Hold
Total 2,631,336 49.41% 2,660,535 49.96% 33,374 0.63% 5,325,245 100.00%

District 1

The 1st district encompasses the Inner Banks, taking in Greenville, Henderson, & Roanoke Rapids. Following redistricting, the district remained relatively the same but lost its share of Durham and Granville counties. In its place it gained Nash, Wayne, and Greene counties. It also increased its share of Wilson and Pitt counties. The incumbent is Democrat G. K. Butterfield, who was re-elected with 69.9% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Sandy Smith, business executive and farmer[5]
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sandy Smith 31,490 77.3
Republican Michele Nix 4,030 9.9
Republican Jim Glisson 3,031 7.4
Republican Ethan Baca 2,206 5.5
Total votes 40,757 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Likely D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 1st congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic G. K. Butterfield (incumbent) 188,870 54.2
Republican Sandy Smith 159,748 45.8
Total votes 348,618 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The 2nd district takes in much of Wake County portion of the Research Triangle region. Following redistricting, the 2nd district is now located entirely in Wake County, taking in Raleigh, Cary, Garner, Apex, Holly Springs, Fuquay-Varina, and Morrisville. Wake Forest and Rocky Mount as well as the rural parts of the district were removed from the district. The incumbent is Republican George Holding, who was re-elected with 51.3% of the vote in 2018.[3] On December 6, 2019, Holding announced he would not seek re-election, after his congressional district was drawn to be more favorable to the Democratic Party.[16]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Alan Swain, attorney[17]
Declined

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Monika Johnson-Hostler, Wake County school board-member[18]
  • Ollie Nelson, retired U.S. Marine, educator, and pastor[19]
  • Andy Terrell, former Obama administration official[20]
Withdrawn
  • Scott Cooper, nonprofit director and former U.S. Marine Corps lieutenant colonel[21]

Endorsements

Monika Johnson-Hostler
Organizations
Deborah K. Ross
Labor unions
Organizations
Newspapers
Andy Terrell
Scott Cooper (withdrawn)
Organizations

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Monika
Johnson-Holster
Ollie
Nelson
Deborah
Ross
Andrew
Terrell
Undecided
ALG Research (D)[A] January 7–12, 2020 501 (LV) ± 4.4% 6% 2% 40% 1% 50%

Primary results

Democratic primary results [7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Deborah K. Ross 103,574 69.9
Democratic Monika Johnson-Hostler 33,369 22.5
Democratic Andy Terrell 8,666 5.8
Democratic Ollie Nelson 2,677 1.8
Total votes 148,286 100.0

Libertarian primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Jeff Matemu, attorney and candidate for North Carolina's 2nd congressional district in 2018[19]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Likely D (flip) July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Likely D (flip) June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D (flip) July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D (flip) April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D (flip) June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D (flip) June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe D (flip) June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Deborah K. Ross 311,887 63.0
Republican Alan Swain 172,544 34.8
Libertarian Jeff Matemu 10,914 2.2
Total votes 495,345 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 3

The 3rd district is located on the Eastern North Carolina shore and covers the Outer Banks and counties along the Pamlico Sound. Republican Walter B. Jones Jr., who was re-elected unopposed in 2018,[3][33] died on February 10, 2019, and a special election was held to fill the vacancy.[34] The incumbent is Republican Greg Murphy, who won the special election with 61.7% of the vote.[35] The district remained relatively unchanged following redistricting.

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg Murphy (incumbent) 229,800 63.4
Democratic Daryl Farrow 132,752 36.6
Total votes 362,552 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The 4th district takes in the part of the Research Triangle area not located in Wake County including Chapel Hill and Durham. Redistricting resulted in it losing its share of Raleigh, instead picking up northern Wake County, taking in Wake Forest, Zebulon, Rolesville, and Knightdale, as well as Chatham County, Durham County, Franklin County and Granville County. The incumbent is Democrat David Price, who was re-elected with 72.4% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Daniel Ulysses Lockwood, web & graphic designer and developer[37]

Endorsements

Daniel Ulysses Lockwood
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price (incumbent) 153,322 86.7
Democratic Daniel Ulysses Lockwood 23,564 13.3
Total votes 176.886 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Robert Thomas, attorney[19]
Eliminated in primary
  • Steve Von Loor, nominee for North Carolina's 4th congressional district in 2018[19]
  • Debesh Sarkar, structural engineer[40]
  • Nasir Shaikh[19]

Primary results

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robert Thomas 17,474 48.3
Republican Debesh Sarkar 8,320 23.0
Republican Steve Von Loor 6,283 17.3
Republican Nasir Shaikh 4,127 11.4
Total votes 36,159 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 4th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Price (incumbent) 332,421 67.3
Republican Robert Thomas 161,298 32.7
Total votes 493,719 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

The 5th district is based in mostly rural mountainous areas of northwestern North Carolina. Redistricting moved the district to the west and south, resulting in it losing the city of Winston-Salem and picking up many rural counties in western North Carolina. It lost its share of Surry, Stokes, Yadkin, and Forsyth counties to the 10th district. It also lost Avery County to the 11th district. In its place it picked up Gaston County, Cleveland County, part of Rutherford County, as well as Burke and Caldwell counties. A small portion in northwest Catawba County is also in the district. The incumbent is Republican Virginia Foxx, who was re-elected with 57.0% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Declined

Endorsements

Virginia Foxx
Organizations

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Brown 34,339 68.0
Democratic Eric Hughes 16,139 32.0
Total votes 50,478 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Jeff Gregory (Constitution)[19]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Endorsements

David Brown (D)

Results

North Carolina's 5th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Virginia Foxx (incumbent) 257,843 66.9
Democratic David Brown 119,846 31.1
Constitution Jeff Gregory 7,555 2.0
Total votes 385,244 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

Following redistricting, the 6th district now encompasses all of Guilford County, including Greensboro as well as taking in Winston-Salem from neighboring Forsyth County. Most of the district's rural portions were moved to the 10th and the 13th districts. The incumbent is Republican Mark Walker, who was re-elected with 56.5% of the vote in 2018.[3] On December 16, 2019, Walker announced he would not seek re-election, citing his redrawn district becoming significantly more Democratic as his primary reason.[47]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Laura Pichardo, accounts-payable analyst[48]
Declined

Primary results

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lee Haywood 28,842 73.3
Republican Laura Pichardo 10,529 26.7
Total votes 39,371 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Withdrawn
  • Angela Flynn, lay minister[54] (endorsed Kathy Manning)

Endorsements

Rhonda Foxx
Federal politicians
Organizations
  • Higher Heights for America PAC[56]
  • IVYPAC [57]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathy Manning 56,986 48.3
Democratic Rhonda Foxx 23,506 19.9
Democratic Bruce Davis 17,731 15.0
Democratic Derwin Montgomery 14,705 12.5
Democratic Ed Hanes 5,067 4.3
Total votes 117,995 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Jennyfer Bucardo (Independent)[59]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Likely D (flip) July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Likely D (flip) June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D (flip) July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D (flip) April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D (flip) June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D (flip) June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe D (flip) June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 6th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathy Manning 253,531 62.3
Republican Lee Haywood 153,598 37.7
Total votes 407,129 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 7

The 7th district is located in southeastern North Carolina, taking in Wilmington, as well as stretching into the southern exurbs of Raleigh. After the district was redrawn, it lost its share of Wayne and Duplin counties, while gaining all of Johnston and Bladen counties and a small part of eastern Harnett County. The incumbent is Republican David Rouzer, who was re-elected with 55.5% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Disqualified

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Chris Ward, pharmaceutical sales executive[62]
Eliminated in primary
  • Robert Colon, wastewater manager[63]
  • Mark Judson, retired U.S. Army Officer and businessman[64]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chris Ward 35,224 46.3
Democratic Mark Judson 27,640 36.4
Democratic Robert Colon 13,183 17.3
Total votes 76,047 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 7th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Rouzer (incumbent) 272,443 60.2
Democratic Chris Ward 179,045 39.6
Write-in 720 0.2
Total votes 452,208 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

The 8th district spans from the Charlotte exurbs of Concord and Kannapolis into Fayetteville, including China Grove, Albemarle, Troy, Pinehurst, Raeford, and Spring Lake. Redistricting resulted in the 8th district losing its share of Rowan County, Hoke County and southern Moore County, while gaining all of Cumberland County, western Harnett County and most of Lee County. The incumbent is Republican Richard Hudson, who was re-elected with 55.3% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Lean R July 17, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Tilt R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean R July 23, 2020
Politico[11] Tossup November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Lean R October 19, 2020
RCP[13] Likely R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Lean R June 7, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Richard
Hudson (R)
Patricia
Timmons-Goodson (D)
Undecided
DCCC Targeting & Analytics Department (D)[B] October 5–6, 2020 433 (LV) ± 4.7% 42% 45% 13%
Brilliant Corners Research & Strategies (D)[C] September 28, 2020 612 (LV) ± 4% 44% 42%
Brilliant Corners Research & Strategies (D)[C] July 23–30, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 43% 41%

Endorsements

Results

North Carolina's 8th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Hudson (incumbent) 202,774 53.3
Democratic Patricia Timmons-Goodson 177,781 46.7
Total votes 380,555 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The 9th district spans from south Charlotte and its southern suburbs of Matthews and Mint Hill into suburban Fayetteville, including Union, Anson, Richmond, Scotland, and Robeson counties. The district remained vacant after the 2018 elections,[3] following the refusal of the state board of elections to certify the results and an ongoing investigation into absentee ballot fraud,[73] and on February 21, 2019, all five members of the board voted to call a new election.[74] Redistricting resulted in the district losing its share of Cumberland and Bladen counties, while gaining southern Moore County and Hoke County. The incumbent is Republican Dan Bishop, who won the special election with 50.7% of the vote.[75]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Cynthia Wallace 45,359 56.0
Democratic Harry Southerland 13,163 16.3
Democratic Clayton Brooks 11,913 14.7
Democratic Marcus Williams 10,527 13.0
Total votes 80,962 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Lean R October 21, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Likely R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R October 30, 2020
RCP[13] Likely R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Lean R June 7, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Dan
Bishop (R)
Cynthia
Wallace (D)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[D] October 27–29, 2020 750 (V) 45% 43% 12%
Wick Surveys (D)[E] September 30 – October 2, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 30% 34% 37%

Results

North Carolina's 9th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Bishop (incumbent) 224,661 55.6
Democratic Cynthia Wallace 179,463 44.4
Total votes 404,124 100.0
Republican hold

District 10

The 10th district encompasses western North Carolina stretching from the Charlotte suburbs to the South Carolina border. It lost its share of Asheville following redistricting and some of its share of the southwestern Piedmont in south central North Carolina. It gained Rockingham County, Stokes County, Surry County, Yadkin County, Iredell County, as well as part of Forsyth County from the old 5th district. The incumbent is Republican Patrick McHenry, who was re-elected with 59.3% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Primary results

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry (incumbent) 62,661 71.7
Republican David L. Johnson 14,286 16.3
Republican Ralf Walters 10,484 12.0
Total votes 87,431 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 10th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Patrick McHenry (incumbent) 284,095 68.9
Democratic David Parker 128,189 31.1
Total votes 412,284 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

The 11th district encompasses most of rural western North Carolina, taking in the Appalachian part of the state. Redistricting resulted in the district gaining all Buncombe County, taking in Asheville. The most recent incumbent was Republican Mark Meadows, who was re-elected with 59.2% of the vote in 2018.[3] On December 19, 2019, Meadows announced he would not run for re-election. In March 2020, Meadows was selected to serve as the 29th White House Chief of Staff, and resigned from his seat in Congress.[79]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Lynda Bennett, businesswoman[81]
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Primary results

Republican primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynda Bennett 20,606 22.7
Republican Madison Cawthorn 18,481 20.4
Republican Jim Davis 17,465 19.3
Republican Chuck Archerd 8,272 9.1
Republican Wayne King 7,876 8.7
Republican Dan Driscoll 7,803 8.6
Republican Joey Osborne 6,470 7.1
Republican Vance Patterson 2,242 2.5
Republican Matthew Burril 523 0.6
Republican Albert Wiley Jr. 393 0.4
Republican Dillon Gentry 390 0.4
Republican Steve Fekete Jr. 175 0.2
Total votes 90,696 100.0

Endorsements

Lynda Bennett (R)
Executive officials
Federal Officials
Organizations
Madison Cawthorn (R)
Federal officials
State and local officials

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[90]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Madison Cawthorn 30,636 65.8
Republican Lynda Bennett 15,905 34.2
Total votes 46,541 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Declined
  • Heath Shuler, former U.S. Representative for North Carolina's 11th congressional district (2007–2013)[94]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Moe Davis 52,983 47.3
Democratic Gina Collias 25,387 22.7
Democratic Phillip Price 12,620 11.3
Democratic Michael O'Shea 12,523 11.2
Democratic Steve Woodsmall 8,439 7.5
Total votes 111,952 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Tracey DeBruhl (Libertarian)[82]
  • Tamara Zwinak (Green)[91]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Lean R October 8, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Lean R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[95] Likely R August 31, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Endorsements:

Moe Davis (D)
Madison Cawthorn (R)
Federal officials
State and local officials
Organizations

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Madison
Cawthorn (R)
Moe
Davis (D)
Other/
Undecided
EMC Research (D)[F] October 15–18, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 42% 45%
EMC Research (D)[F] September 22–24, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 42% 46%
DCCC Targeting & Analytics Department (D)[B] August 5–6, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 46% 41% 13%[b]
EMC Research (D)[F] July 9–12, 2020 402 (LV) ± 4.89% 42% 40%

Results

North Carolina's 11th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Madison Cawthorn 245,351 54.5
Democratic Moe Davis 190,609 42.4
Libertarian Tracey DeBruhl 8,682 1.9
Green Tamara Zwinak 5,503 1.2
Total votes 450,145 100.0
Republican hold

District 12

The 12th district is centered around Charlotte and the surrounding immediate suburbs, including Huntersville, Cornelius, Davidson, and Pineville. Redistricting left the 12th district relatively unchanged, but it gained some southern Charlotte suburbs, including Mint Hill and parts of Matthews. The incumbent is Democrat Alma Adams, who was re-elected with 73.1% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Keith Cradle, youth program director[19]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams (incumbent) 109,009 88.1
Democratic Keith Cradle 14,713 11.9
Total votes 123,722 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Disqualified
  • Bill Brewster, businessman[100]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 12th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alma Adams (incumbent) 341,457 100.0
Total votes 341,457 100.0
Democratic hold

District 13

Following redistricting, the 13th district lost some of its share of the Piedmont Triad region, losing Greensboro to the 6th district & Iredell County to the 10th district. It retained Davidson County and Davie County and expanded its share of Rowan County. The district also gained most of the rural counties previously in the 6th district, including Randolph County, Alamance County, Caswell County, Person County, and a small section of Chatham County. The incumbent is Republican Ted Budd, who was re-elected with 51.5% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Declined

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Endorsements

Ted Budd (R)
Organizations
Scott Huffman (D)

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[8] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

North Carolina's 13th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Budd (incumbent) 267,181 68.2
Democratic Scott Huffman 124,684 31.8
Total votes 391,865 100.0
Republican hold

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ "Other candidates" with 6%; Undecided with 7%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Internal poll sponsored by Deborah K. Ross
  2. ^ a b c Poll conducted by the DCCC.
  3. ^ a b Poll conducted for the Timmons-Goodson campaign.
  4. ^ Poll sponsored by 314 Action, which endorsed Wallace prior to the sampling period.
  5. ^ Poll sponsored by Left of Center PAC.
  6. ^ a b c Poll conducted for the Davis campaign.

References

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External links

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 9th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 10th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 11th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 12th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 13th district candidates
This page was last edited on 14 April 2021, at 05:43
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