To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

1988 United States presidential election in California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1988 United States presidential election in California

← 1984 November 8, 1988 1992 →
Turnout72.81% (of registered voters) Decrease 2.12 pp
53.51% (of eligible voters) Decrease 5.57 pp [1]
 
1988 Bush (cropped).jpg
Michael Dukakis color photograph.png
Nominee George H. W. Bush Michael Dukakis
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Texas Massachusetts
Running mate Dan Quayle Lloyd Bentsen
Electoral vote 47 0
Popular vote 5,054,917 4,702,233
Percentage 51.13% 47.56%

California Presidential Election Results 1988.svg
County Results

President before election

Ronald Reagan
Republican

Elected President

George H. W. Bush
Republican

Bush campaigning in San Francisco on September 14, 1988
Bush campaigning in San Francisco on September 14, 1988
Dukakis holds an election eve rally at the Pauley Pavilion
Dukakis holds an election eve rally at the Pauley Pavilion

The 1988 United States presidential election in California took place on November 8, 1988, and was part of the 1988 United States presidential election. Voters chose 47 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

California voted for the Republican nominee, Vice President George H. W. Bush, over the Democratic nominee, Massachusetts governor Michael Dukakis by a margin of 3.57 percent. Bush won forty-four of the state’s fifty-eight counties, but the election was kept close by Dukakis’ strong performance in the Bay Area and his victory in Los Angeles, the state’s most populated county. Also, Dukakis won at least 31% of the vote in every county and at least 40 percent in forty of them. Much like Vermont in the same year, California was seen by observers as a swing state in this year's presidential election cycle due to fairly close polling.

To date, this is the last presidential election in which the state of California was carried by a Republican candidate. From the next election onwards, California would, like the other two states on the West Coast, vote consistently for Democratic candidates (Oregon and Washington even voted for Dukakis in 1988), forming a "blue wall" of sorts over the next three decades. In fact, this is the only time since 1948 that Oregon and California voted for different candidates. Bush is also the last Republican to carry the following counties in a presidential election: Imperial, Monterey, Napa, Sacramento, San Benito and Santa Barbara, the last Republican to win any county in the Bay Area (Napa), and the last Republican to secure at least one-quarter of the vote in San Francisco.

Bush became the first Republican to win the White House without carrying Sonoma County since Benjamin Harrison in 1888.

Analysis

California voted Republican in 1988 for the ninth time out of ten elections from 1952 on, confirming its status as a Republican electoral bulwark during this period.[2] However, George H. W. Bush won California by only 3.57% even as he won nationally by 7.72%; and Florida displaced it as the state providing the Republican with his biggest raw-vote margin in the nation. Signs of the phenomena that would come to make California a 'Blue Wall' state from 1992 on emerged in this election; for the first time since 1916, Los Angeles County voted for the loser of the national election. Bush was also nearly swept out of the Bay Area, losing populous former Republican strongholds such as Santa Clara, San Mateo, Sonoma, and Marin Counties (as well as Santa Cruz County, the northernmost Central Coast county). While Bush continued to do well in San Diego, Orange, and Ventura Counties (and, to a lesser extent, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Monterey Counties, as well as in relatively thinly populated Napa County), this represented a significant erosion of the Republican Party's traditional base along the length of California's coast.[3] By 2016 and 2020, this process was complete, as every coastal county in the state save Del Norte voted Democratic two elections in a row.

On the other hand, in contrast to the 1976, 1968, 1960, and 1948 elections in California, all of which had been close (and which had been won by the Democrat in 1948), Dukakis carried little of inland California, which had traditionally been the Democratic base in the state.[4] Counties that had voted Democratic in all four of those elections, but voted Republican in 1988, included Sacramento, Fresno, Placer, Merced, Shasta, Madera, Amador, Lassen, Plumas, Trinity, and Sierra Counties. Apart from Sacramento, Fresno, and Merced Counties, these have continued to remain as Republican strongholds in the state even as overall it has become increasingly blue in the 21st century. Comparing 1988 directly with what at the time was the most recent close election in California, 1976, Dukakis carried only nine of the 27 counties Carter carried in the state. Three of these (Shasta, Plumas, and Sierra) had even voted for McGovern in the disastrous Democratic defeat of 1972.

Results

1988 United States presidential election in California[5]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican George Herbert Walker Bush 5,054,917 51.13% 47
Democratic Michael Stanley Dukakis 4,702,233 47.56% 0
Libertarian Ron Paul 70,105 0.71% 0
Independent Lenora Fulani 31,180 0.32% 0
American Independent James C. Griffin 27,818 0.28% 0
No party David Duke (write-in) 483 0.00% 0
No party Eugene McCarthy (write-in) 234 0.00% 0
No party Herbert G. Lewin (write-in) 58 0.00% 0
No party Write-in 25 0.00% 0
No party Larry Holmes (write-in) 11 0.00% 0
Invalid or blank votes
Totals 9,887,064 100.00% 47
Voter turnout

Results Breakdown

By county

County Bush Votes Dukakis Votes Others Votes
Orange 67.75% 586,230 31.09% 269,013 1.16% 10,064
Sutter 67.47% 14,100 31.09% 6,557 1.15% 241
Inyo 64.34% 5,042 33.85% 2,653 1.81% 142
Modoc 62.68% 2,518 35.25% 1,416 2.07% 83
Glenn 62.06% 4,944 36.33% 2,894 1.61% 128
Ventura 61.64% 147,604 37.19% 89,065 1.17% 2,804
Kern 61.48% 90,550 37.40% 55,083 1.13% 1,660
Mono 61.38% 2,177 36.20% 1,284 2.42% 86
Yuba 61.37% 8,937 37.38% 5,444 1.25% 182
San Diego 60.19% 523,143 38.34% 333,264 1.47% 12,788
San Bernardino 59.99% 235,167 38.55% 151,118 1.46% 5,723
Tulare 59.61% 46,891 39.04% 30,711 1.36% 1,067
Placer 59.59% 42,096 38.95% 27,516 1.46% 1,030
Colusa 59.49% 3,077 39.10% 2,022 1.41% 73
Riverside 59.46% 199,979 39.58% 133,122 0.97% 3,247
Shasta 59.36% 32,402 38.79% 21,171 1.85% 1,012
El Dorado 59.33% 30,021 39.13% 19,801 1.54% 781
Lassen 58.59% 5,157 39.15% 3,446 2.26% 199
Nevada 57.76% 21,383 40.46% 14,980 1.78% 660
Tehama 56.52% 9,854 41.37% 7,213 2.11% 367
Kings 56.41% 12,118 42.56% 9,142 1.03% 222
Calaveras 56.28% 7,640 41.80% 5,674 1.92% 260
Butte 56.04% 40,143 42.45% 30,406 1.51% 1,082
Amador 55.87% 6,893 42.12% 5,197 2.01% 248
San Luis Obispo 55.85% 46,613 42.73% 35,667 1.42% 1,187
Alpine 55.43% 306 41.67% 230 2.90% 16
Imperial 55.16% 12,889 43.84% 10,243 1.00% 233
Trinity 54.63% 3,267 42.11% 2,518 3.26% 195
Madera 54.59% 13,255 43.83% 10,642 1.58% 384
Mariposa 54.53% 3,768 43.39% 2,998 2.08% 144
San Joaquin 54.39% 75,309 44.56% 61,699 1.04% 1,445
Santa Barbara 54.24% 77,524 44.48% 63,586 1.28% 1,830
San Benito 54.11% 5,578 44.23% 4,559 1.66% 171
Tuolumne 54.00% 10,646 44.22% 8,717 1.79% 352
Stanislaus 53.07% 51,648 45.92% 44,685 1.01% 982
Merced 51.20% 21,717 47.40% 20,105 1.40% 592
Plumas 51.06% 4,603 47.15% 4,251 1.79% 161
Sacramento 51.01% 201,832 47.65% 188,557 1.34% 5,301
Siskiyou 50.88% 9,056 47.00% 8,365 2.11% 376
Sierra 50.71% 860 46.64% 791 2.65% 45
Napa 50.19% 23,235 48.14% 22,283 1.67% 772
Fresno 49.95% 94,835 48.79% 92,635 1.26% 2,400
Monterey 49.83% 50,022 48.81% 48,998 1.36% 1,361
Del Norte 49.73% 3,714 48.03% 3,587 2.24% 167
Lake 48.03% 9,366 50.39% 9,828 1.58% 308
Contra Costa 47.86% 158,652 51.10% 169,411 1.04% 3,448
Solano 47.43% 50,314 51.23% 54,344 1.35% 1,430
Santa Clara 46.99% 254,442 51.30% 277,810 1.71% 9,276
Los Angeles 46.88% 1,239,716 51.89% 1,372,352 1.23% 32,603
San Mateo 42.94% 109,261 55.74% 141,859 1.32% 3,360
Mendocino 41.94% 12,979 55.42% 17,152 2.64% 816
Sonoma 41.91% 67,725 56.48% 91,262 1.61% 2,596
Yolo 41.89% 22,358 57.01% 30,429 1.10% 585
Humboldt 41.15% 21,460 57.11% 29,781 1.74% 905
Marin 39.73% 46,855 58.85% 69,394 1.42% 1,671
Santa Cruz 36.77% 37,728 61.53% 63,133 1.71% 1,750
Alameda 33.99% 162,815 64.78% 310,283 1.23% 5,899
San Francisco 26.14% 72,503 72.78% 201,887 1.08% 3,004

See also

References

  1. ^ https://elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov/sov/2018-general/sov/04-historical-voter-reg-participation.pdf
  2. ^ "Red States and Blue States Are a Myth". National Review. 2016-12-01. Retrieved 2020-12-31.
  3. ^ "The California Republican Party's long slide into irrelevance". Orange County Register. 2018-07-02. Retrieved 2020-12-31.
  4. ^ "The California Republican Party's long slide into irrelevance". Orange County Register. 2018-07-02. Retrieved 2020-12-31.
  5. ^ "1988 Presidential General Election Results - California". Dave Leip's U.S. Election Atlas. Retrieved 2008-08-25.
This page was last edited on 27 February 2021, at 11:59
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.