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2020 Florida elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 Florida elections

← 2018
2022 →

Florida state elections in 2020 was held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. Aside from its presidential primaries held on March 17, its primary elections were held on August 18, 2020.[1]

In addition to the U.S. presidential race, Florida voters will elect all of its seats to the U.S. House of Representatives, one seat on the Florida Supreme Court, 25 of 65 seats on the Florida District Courts of Appeal, all of the seats of the Florida House of Representatives, and 21 of 40 seats in the Florida Senate. Six ballot measures will be voted on. Neither of the state's two U.S. Senate seats were up for election in 2020.[1]

To vote by mail, registered Florida voters must request a ballot by October 24, 2020.[2] As of early October some 5,547,170 voters have requested mail ballots.[3]

Federal offices

A blank 2020 General Election Ballot from Sumter County.
A blank 2020 General Election Ballot from Sumter County.

President of the United States

Florida has 29 electoral votes in the Electoral College. Donald Trump won all of them with 51% of the popular vote. The following people filed for presidency candidacy:

2020 Presidential Candidates
Candidate Party Incumbent
Donald J. Trump Republican Party
Joe R. Biden Jr. Democratic Party
Joanne "Jo" M. Jorgensen Libertarian Party
Gloria E. La Riva Party for Socialism and Liberation
Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente Reform Party
Brian T. Carroll (unaffiliated / independent)
Shawn W. Howard (unaffiliated / independent)
Valeria L. McCray (unaffiliated / independent)
Jade Simmons (unaffiliated / independent)
Kasey Wells (unaffiliated / independent)

United States House of Representatives

There are 26 U.S. Representatives in Florida that were up for election in addition to two seats opened by retirements and one opened after the incumbent, Ross Spano, lost renomination in its Republican primary.[4] 16 Republicans and 11 Democrats were returned. The Republican Party gained two districts, the 26th and the 27th.

2020 U.S. House of Representatives Candidates
Candidate Party District Incumbent
Gus M. Bilirakis Republican Party 12
Kimberly Walker Democratic Party 12
Ardian Zika Republican Party 37
Tammy Garcia Democratic Party 37

State offices

State Judiciary

A retention election occurred for one of seven seats on the Supreme Court of Florida. The incumbent, Carlos G. Muñiz, filed for re-election. He won another 6-year term with 66% of the votes.[5]

Shall Justice Carlos G. Muniz be retained in Office?[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
6,297,753 65.74
No 3,281,468 34.26
Total votes 9,579,221 100.00

State Legislature

All 120 seats of the Florida House of Representatives and 21 of 40 seats of the Florida Senate are up for election. The outcome of this election could affect partisan balance during post-census redistricting.[7]

State Senate

20 out of 40 seats were up for election in the state Senate with one special election. Before the election the composition of the state Senate was:

Party # of seats
Republican 23
Democratic 17
Total 40

After the election, the composition was:

Party # of seats
Republican 24
Democratic 16
Total 40

House of Representatives

All 120 seats in the state House were up for election. Before the election the composition of the state House was:

Party # of seats
Republican 71
Democratic 46
Total 120[a]

After the election, the composition was:

Party # of seats
Republican 78
Democratic 42
Total 120

Ballot measures

To pass, any state constitutional amendment requires 60% of the vote.[8]

Amendment 1

Citizen Requirement for Voting Initiative would enshrine in the state constitution the exclusivity of voting rights for U.S. Citizens.[9]

Amendment 1[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
8,307,109 79.29
No 2,169,684 20.71
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,476,793 100.00

Amendment 2

$15 Minimum Wage Initiative would alter the state's constitution to guarantee a gradual raise of the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2026.[10]

Amendment 2[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
6,391,753 60.82
No 4,117,815 39.18
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,509,568 100.00

Amendment 3

Top-Two Open Primaries Initiative would implement the contemporary Californian primary system, opening primaries to all votes regardless of party registration, placing candidates of all parties on the same ballot and advancing the first-place and second-place finishers to the General Election regardless of party affiliation. In addition, if only two candidates filed for the primary, this system would cancel the primary and automatically send them to the General Election.[11]

Amendment 3[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed
No
4,410,768 42.97
Yes 5,854,468 57.03
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,265,236 100.00

Amendment 4

Require Constitutional Amendments to be Passed Twice would require that any further amendments would need to succeed in two different elections to be ratified.[12]

Amendment 4[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed
No
5,356,792 52.47
Yes 4,853,402 47.53
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,210,194 100.00

Amendment 5

Extend "Save Our Homes" Portability Period Amendment would increase the period during which a person may transfer "Save Our Homes" benefits to a new homestead property from two years to three years.

Amendment 5[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
7,484,104 74.49
No 2,562,387 25.51
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,046,491 100.00

Amendment 6

Homestead Property Tax Discount for Spouses of Deceased Veterans Amendment would allow a homestead property tax discount to be transferred to the surviving spouse of a deceased veteran.

Amendment 6[6]
Choice Votes %
Referendum passed
Yes
9,305,503 89.73
No 1,065,308 10.27
Required majority 60.00
Total votes 10,370,811 100.00

Polling

The highlighted result in any poll is whichever is closer to its threshold (40% for 'against' and 60% for 'for' with respect to a given amendment).

Amendment 1
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 1 Against Florida Amendment 1 Undecided
Civiqs/Daily Kos October 17–20, 2020 863 (LV) ± 3.5% 53% 39% 9%
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 3,091 (LV) 78%[c] 18% 2%[d]
St. Leo University Polling Institute November 13–18, 2019 500 (A) ± 4.5% 80% 10% 9%
Amendment 2
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 2 Against Florida Amendment 2 Other Undecided
St. Pete Polls October 29–30, 2020 2,758 (LV) ± 1.9% 58% 35% 8%
Monmouth University October 24–28, 2020 509 (RV) ± 4.7% 63% 32% 2%[e] 4%
Florida Atlantic University October 24–25, 2020 937 (LV) ± 3.1% 62% 38% 8%
Civiqs/Daily Kos October 17–20, 2020 863 (LV) ± 3.5% 57% 38% 4%
Ipsos/Pure Spectrum October 7–15, 2020 1,001 (A) ± 3.5% 70% 21% 9%
Emerson College October 10–12, 2020 690 (LV) ± 3.7% 52% 31% 11%
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 3,055 (LV) 60%[c] 37% 3%[f]
Cherry Communications/Florida Chamber of Commerce[1][A] September 23–29, 2020 604 (LV) ± 4% 66%
St. Pete Polls September 21–22, 2020 2,906 (LV) ± 1.8% 65% 23% 13%
Monmouth University September 10–13, 2020 428 (RV) ± 4.7% 67% 26% 1%[g] 6%
St. Pete Polls/Florida Politics May 26–27, 2020 4,763 (RV) ± 1.4% 64% 24% 12%
St. Leo University Polling Institute November 13–18, 2019 500 (A) ± 4.5% 63% 26% 11%
St. Pete Polls May 6 – June 1, 2019 3,790 (RV) ± 1.6% 58% 35% 7%
Amendment 3
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 3 Against Florida Amendment 3 Other Undecided
St. Pete Polls October 29–30, 2020 2,758 (LV) ± 1.9% 48% 40% 12%
Monmouth University October 24–28, 2020 509 (RV) ± 4.7% 53% 30% 2%[h] 15%
Florida Atlantic University October 24–25, 2020 937 (LV) ± 3.1% 58% 29% 13%
St. Pete Polls/Florida Politics October 21–22, 2020 2,527 (LV) ± 2% 37% 44% 19%
Civiqs/Daily Kos October 17–20, 2020 863 (LV) ± 3.5% 51% 36% 13%
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 2,994 (LV) 58%[c] 36% 6%[i]
Cherry Communications/Florida Chamber of Commerce[2][B] September 23–29, 2020 604 (LV) ± 4% 61%
St. Pete Polls September 21–22, 2020 2,906 (LV) ± 1.8% 46% 35% 19%
Monmouth University September 10–13, 2020 428 (RV) ± 4.7% 63% 21% 1%[j] 15%
St. Pete Polls/Florida Politics May 26–27, 2020 4,763 (RV) ± 1.4% 35% 44% 20%
St. Pete Polls October 7–10, 2019 3,283 (RV) ± 1.7% 38% 48% 14%
St. Pete Polls May 6 – June 1, 2019 3,790 (RV) ± 1.6% 59% 26% 14%
Amendment 4
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 4 Against Florida Amendment 4 Undecided
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 2,943 (LV) 52%[c] 41% 7%[k]
Cherry Communications/Florida Chamber of Commerce[3][C] September 23–29, 2020 604 (LV) ± 4% 61%
St. Pete Polls September 21–22, 2020 2,906 (LV) ± 1.8% 44% 31% 25%
St. Pete Polls October 7–10, 2019 3,283 (RV) ± 1.7% 49% 30% 21%
Amendment 5
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 5 Against Florida Amendment 5 Undecided
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 2,928 (LV) 67%[c] 26% 7%[l]
Amendment 6
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[b]
Margin
of error
For Florida Amendment 6 Against Florida Amendment 6 Undecided
University of North Florida October 1–4, 2020 2,913 (LV) 88%[c] 8% 4%[m]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Including 3 vacancies
  2. ^ a b c d e f Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  3. ^ a b c d e f Questions in this poll were preceded by the pollster's assessment of each measure's potential effects beforehand
  4. ^ Includes "Refused"
  5. ^ Would not vote with 2%
  6. ^ Includes "Refused"
  7. ^ Would not vote with 1%
  8. ^ Would not vote with 2%
  9. ^ Includes "Refused"
  10. ^ Would not vote with 1%
  11. ^ Includes "Refused"
  12. ^ Includes "Refused"
  13. ^ Includes "Refused"
Partisan clients
  1. ^ This poll's sponsor opposed this amendment prior to the sampling period
  2. ^ This poll's sponsor opposed this amendment prior to the sampling period
  3. ^ This poll's sponsor supported this amendment prior to the sampling period

References

  1. ^ a b "Florida elections, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  2. ^ Lily Hay Newman (August 27, 2020), "How to Vote by Mail and Make Sure It Counts", Wired.com, archived from the original on October 6, 2020
  3. ^ Michael P. McDonald, "2020 General Election Early Vote Statistics", U.S. Elections Project, retrieved October 10, 2020, Detailed state statistics
  4. ^ Foran, Clare (August 18, 2020). "Embattled Florida Republican congressman loses primary challenge, CNN projects". CNN. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  5. ^ "Merit Retention Biographies". The Florida Bar. May 26, 2020. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Florida Department of State - Election Results 2020 General". Florida Department of State Division of Elections. Florida Department of State. Retrieved December 29, 2020.
  7. ^ Wendy Underhill; Ben Williams (December 4, 2019), "Election Dates for Legislators and Governors Who Will Do Redistricting", Ncsl.org, Washington, D.C.: National Conference of State Legislatures
  8. ^ "Supermajority Vote Requirements". NCSL. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  9. ^ Landers, Rob (September 14, 2020). "Florida Amendments 2020: Amendment 1 requires 'only a' citizen can vote. What it means". Florida Today. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  10. ^ Landers, Rob (August 19, 2020). "Florida Amendments 2020: Amendment 2 raises minimum wage to $15 from $8.56 by 2026". Florida Today. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  11. ^ Aboraya, Abe (September 15, 2020). "What Is Florida's Amendment 3, The All Voters Vote In Primary Elections?". WUSF Public Media. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  12. ^ Aboraya, Abe (September 16, 2020). "What Is Florida's Amendment 4, The Voter Approval Of Constitutional Amendments?". WUSF. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  13. ^ "Covered Areas for Voting Rights Bilingual Election Materials—2015", Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, Federal Register, retrieved October 13, 2020, A Notice by the Census Bureau on 12/05/2016

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 8 January 2021, at 02:32
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