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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 9 Arizona seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 5 4
Seats won 5 4
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,629,318 1,638,516
Percentage 49.85% 50.13%
Swing Decrease 0.52% Increase 1.46%

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Arizona, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

This election was the first time since 1990, that no third-party candidates appeared on the ballot for United States House of Representatives in Arizona.[1]

District 1

The 1st district is based in the northeastern part of the state, encompassing the Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan areas, taking in Casa Grande, Maricopa, Oro Valley, and Marana. The district also includes the Navajo Nation, Hopi Reservation, and Gila River Indian Community. The incumbent is Democrat Tom O'Halleran, who was re-elected with 53.8% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn

Endorsements

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom O'Halleran (incumbent) 47,083 58.6
Democratic Eva Putzova 33,248 41.4
Total votes 80,331 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn
Declined

Endorsements

Tiffany Shedd

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tiffany Shedd 40,310 54.7
Republican Nolan Reidhead 33,418 45.3
Total votes 73,728 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Lean D August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Likely D August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Likely D July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Lean D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Lean D August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Lean D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe D July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 1st congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom O'Halleran (incumbent) 188,469 51.6
Republican Tiffany Shedd 176,709 48.4
Total votes 365,178 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The 2nd district is located in southeastern Arizona, encompassing the eastern Tucson area. The incumbent is Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick, who flipped the district and was elected with 54.7% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Ann Kirkpatrick
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Statewide officials
State legislators
Municipal officials
Notable individuals
Newspapers
Organizations
Labor unions

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick (incumbent) 77,517 76.3
Democratic Peter Quilter 24,035 23.7
Total votes 101,552 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brandon Martin 31,730 42.5
Republican Noran Ruden 25,049 33.6
Republican Joseph Morgan 17,802 23.8
Republican Jordan Flayer (write-in) 52 0.1
Total votes 74,633 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe D August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe D August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe D October 15, 2020
Politico[41] Likely D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe D August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Likely D October 24, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe D July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 2nd congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick (incumbent) 209,945 55.1
Republican Brandon Martin 170,975 44.9
Write-in 134 0.0
Total votes 381,054 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3

The 3rd district encompasses southwestern Arizona, taking in Yuma, western Tucson, as well as stretching into the western suburbs of Phoenix, including Goodyear, Avondale, southern Buckeye, and a small portion of West Phoenix. The incumbent is Democrat Raúl Grijalva, who was re-elected with 63.9% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 63,282 100.0
Total votes 63,282 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Daniel Wood, U.S. Marine Corps veteran[57]
Withdrew
  • Steve Ronnebeck, former auto mechanic[58][59]

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Daniel Wood 29,260 99.8
Republican Richard Jolley (write-in) 44 0.2
Total votes 29,304 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe D August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe D August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe D July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Safe D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe D August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe D July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 3rd congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 174,243 64.6
Republican Daniel Wood 95,594 35.4
Total votes 269,837 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

The 4th district is located in north-central Arizona, taking in Lake Havasu City, Prescott, and the Phoenix exurbs, including San Tan Valley, Apache Junction, and northern Buckeye. The incumbent is Republican Paul Gosar, who was re-elected with 68.2% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 82,370 63.1
Republican Anne Marie Ward 48,116 36.9
Total votes 130,486 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Delina DiSanto, businesswoman and candidate for Arizona's 4th congressional district in 2018[62]
  • Stuart "Stu" Starky, nominee for U.S. Senate in 2004 and former school principal[63]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Delina DiSanto 34,345 74.3
Democratic Stu Starky 11,852 25.7
Total votes 46,197 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe R August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe R August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe R July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Safe R July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe R August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe R July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 4th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 278,002 69.7
Democratic Delina DiSanto 120,484 30.2
Write-in 137 0.0
Total votes 398,623 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The 5th district is centered around the eastern suburbs of Phoenix, including Gilbert, Queen Creek, southern and eastern Chandler, and eastern Mesa. The incumbent is Republican Andy Biggs, who was re-elected with 59.4% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Biggs (incumbent) 104,888 99.6
Republican Joe Vess (write-in) 465 0.4
Total votes 105,353 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joan Greene 34,070 50.0
Democratic Javier Ramos 26,818 39.4
Democratic Jonathan Ireland 7,209 10.6
Total votes 68,097 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe R August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe R August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe R July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Safe R July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe R August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe R July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 5th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Biggs (incumbent) 262,414 58.9
Democratic Joan Greene 183,171 41.1
Write-in 72 0.0
Total votes 445,657 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The 6th district covers parts of the northeastern suburbs of Phoenix, containing Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, Cave Creek, Fountain Hills, as well as a portion of North Phoenix, including Deer Valley and Desert View. The incumbent is Republican David Schweikert, who was re-elected with 55.2% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

David Schweikert
Organizations

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 94,434 100.0
Total votes 94,434 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Anita Malik
Organizations
Hiral Tipirneni
Federal officials
State officials
Labor unions
Organizations

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Karl
Gentles
Anita
Malik
Stephanie
Rimmer
Hiral
Tipirneni
Undecided
OH Predictive Insights August 3, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 3% 30% 2% 53% 12%
Zogby Strategies (D)[A] August 28–30, 2019 400 (LV) 20% 12% 13% 55%

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hiral Tipirneni 42,538 53.2
Democratic Anita Malik 29,218 36.5
Democratic Stephanie Rimmer 4,592 5.7
Democratic Karl Gentles 3,651 4.6
Total votes 79,999 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Tossup October 2, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Tossup October 16, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Politico[41] Tossup September 8, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Tossup October 6, 2020
RCP[43] Lean R October 5, 2020
Niskanen[44] Tossup July 26, 2020
The Economist[89] Tossup October 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
David
Schweikert (R)
Hiral
Tipirneni (D)
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[B] October 26–27, 2020 582 (LV) 41% 45%
OH Predictive Insights September 23–27, 2020 531 (LV) ± 4.3% 49% 46% 0%[b] 5%
GQR Research (D)[C] September 23–26, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 45% 49% 6%
Public Policy Polling (D)[D] September 22–23, 2020 527 (V) 45% 43% 12%
GQR Research (D)[C] August 6–12, 2020 548 (LV) ± 4.2% 45% 48%
DCCC Targeting & Analytics Department (D)[E] July 29 – August 1, 2020 586 (LV) ± 4.0% 46% 43%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Undecided
PPP September 22–23, 2020 527 (V) 48% 47% 5%

Results

Arizona's 6th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 217,783 52.2
Democratic Hiral Tipirneni 199,644 47.8
Total votes 417,427 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The 7th district encompasses Downtown Phoenix and western Phoenix, including the urban villages of Maryvale, Estrella, Laveen, South Mountain, Central City, Encanto, and Alhambra, as well as Tolleson and southern Glendale. The incumbent is Democrat Ruben Gallego, who was re-elected with 85.6% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego (incumbent) 56,037 100.0
Total votes 56,037 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Josh Barnett, entrepreneur[66]

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Josh Barnett 15,223 100.0
Total votes 15,223 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe D August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe D August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe D July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Safe D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe D August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe D July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 7th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego (incumbent) 165,452 76.7
Republican Josh Barnett 50,226 23.3
Write-in 54 0.0
Total votes 215,732 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

The 8th district encompasses the western and northwestern suburbs of Phoenix, taking in Surprise, Peoria, Litchfield Park, Anthem, northern Glendale, and parts of North Phoenix, including North Gateway and Rio Vista. The incumbent is Republican Debbie Lesko, who was re-elected with 55.5% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Debbie Lesko
Executive Branch officials
U.S. Representatives
Governors
Other statewide officials
State legislators
County officials
Municipal officials
Notable individuals
  • Pat Boone, singer, composer, actor, writer, television personality, motivational speaker, and spokesman[91]
Organizations

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Debbie Lesko (incumbent) 105,630 100.0
Total votes 105,630 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Endorsements

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael Muscato 35,898 54.3
Democratic Bob Olsen 20,534 31.1
Democratic Bob Musselwhite 9,575 14.5
Democratic Kyle Martin (write-in) 45 0.1
Total votes 66,052 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe R August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe R August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe R July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Likely R July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe R August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe R July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 8th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Debbie Lesko (incumbent) 251,633 59.6
Democratic Michael Muscato 170,816 40.4
Write-in 18 0.0
Total votes 422,467 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The 9th district is based in the Phoenix metro, and includes Tempe, southern Scottsdale, western Mesa, northwestern Chandler, and southern Phoenix, containing Ahwatukee and Camelback East. The incumbent is Democrat Greg Stanton, who was elected with 61.1% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Democratic primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Stanton (incumbent) 83,443 100.0
Total votes 83,443 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Republican primary results[28]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dave Giles 28,461 53.7
Republican Sam Huang 12,527 23.6
Republican Nicholas Tutora 12,053 22.7
Total votes 53,041 100.0

Independents

Candidates

Withdrawn

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[38] Safe D August 21, 2020
Inside Elections[39] Safe D August 21, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[40] Safe D July 23, 2020
Politico[41] Safe D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[42] Safe D August 17, 2020
RCP[43] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[44] Safe D July 26, 2020

Results

Arizona's 9th congressional district, 2020[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Stanton (incumbent) 217,094 61.6
Republican Dave Giles 135,180 38.4
Total votes 352,274 100.0
Democratic hold

See also

Notes

Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll conducted for Anita Malik
  2. ^ Poll sponsored by 314 Action, which has endorsed Tipierneni prior to the sampling period.
  3. ^ a b Poll sponsored by Tipirneni's campaign.
  4. ^ Poll sponsored by the House Majority PAC.
  5. ^ Poll sponsored by the DCCC
General notes
  1. ^ a b c Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ "Refused" with 0%

References

  1. ^ "For the First Time Since 1990, Arizona Has a Democratic-Republican Monopoly for all Congressional Races". Ballot Access News. September 13, 2020. Archived from the original on September 13, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
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  4. ^ Skabelund, Adrian (January 16, 2019). "Former councilmember Eva Putzova to run for US House seat in 2020". Arizona Daily Sun. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  5. ^ Duda, Jeremy (August 19, 2019). "Former lawmaker McGuire challenging O'Halleran in Dem primary". AZ Mirror. Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  6. ^ "Delina DiSanto, Barbara McGuire featured speakers at San Tan Valley Democrats Aug. 15 meeting". Queen Creek Independent. August 13, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  7. ^ Bell, David (July 18, 2019). "Shedd joins Taylor in seeking GOP nom for Congress". Retrieved August 13, 2019.
  8. ^ "Larry Williams (Arizona)". Ballotpedia. Retrieved August 1, 2020.
  9. ^ Muller, Tiffany (September 30, 2019). "End Citizens United Endorses Seventeen House Democrats". End Citizens United.
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  12. ^ "Jewish Dems roll out new round of congressional endorsements". Jewish Insider. June 17, 2020. Retrieved August 1, 2020.
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  16. ^ "Pro-Israel America Endorses 2020 House Candidates Congressman Don Bacon and Congressman Tom O'Halleran – Pro-Israel America". proisraelamerica.org. Retrieved August 1, 2020.
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  23. ^ "Endorsed Candidates". National Women's Political Caucus. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
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External links

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 9th district candidates
This page was last edited on 11 January 2021, at 06:48
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