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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 5 Oregon seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 4 1
Seats won 4 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,285,339 966,786
Percentage 55.69% 41.89%
Swing Decrease 1.76% Increase 3.87%

2020ORUSHouse.svg
     Democratic hold      Republican hold

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the five U.S. Representatives from the state of Oregon, one from each of the state's five congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2020

Primary elections — May 19, 2020 - August 25, 2020

Party Votes Percentage Candidates Advancing to general Seats contesting
Democratic 589,473 61.97% 19 5 5
Republican 361,733 38.02% 22 5 5
Independent Party of Oregon TBD
Libertarian TBD 4 3 3
Green TBD 2 2 2
Constitution TBD
Oregon Progressive TBD
Totals 951,206 100.00

The Democratic and Republican Parties held their primaries on May 19, 2020. Oregon's other parties held their primaries at various dates until August 25, 2020.[1]

District 1

The 1st district is located in northwestern Oregon and takes in the western Portland metro area, including the Portland suburbs of Beaverton and Hillsboro. The incumbent is Democrat Suzanne Bonamici, who was re-elected with 63.6% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Ricky Barajas, candidate for Oregon's 1st congressional district in 2018[3]
  • Suzanne Bonamici, incumbent U.S. Representative[4]
  • Heidi Briones, insurance agent and universal basic income advocate[5]
  • Amanda Siebe, disability rights activist[6]

Endorsements

Amanda Siebe

Primary results

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici (incumbent) 100,733 83.6
Democratic Heidi Briones 8,260 6.9
Democratic Amanda Siebe 8,055 6.7
Democratic Ricky Barajas 2,948 2.4
Democratic Write-in 523 0.4
Total votes 120,519 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Christopher Christensen, small business owner[17]
  • Armidia "Army" Murray, former UPS worker[18]
Withdrawn
  • Laura Curtis, small business owner (withdrew on March 9, 2020)[19]

Primary results

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Christopher Christensen 27,417 55.8
Republican Army (Armidia) Murray 20,509 41.8
Republican Write-in 1,162 2.4
Total votes 49,088 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[20] Safe D August 5, 2020
Inside Elections[21] Safe D July 24, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[22] Safe D July 23, 2020
Politico[23] Safe D July 6, 2020
Daily Kos[24] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[25] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[26] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Oregon's 1st congressional district, 2020[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzanne Bonamici (incumbent) 297,071 64.6
Republican Christopher Christensen 161,928 35.2
Write-in 900 0.2
Total votes 459,899 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

The 2nd district, the largest of Oregon's five districts, covers roughly two-thirds of the state east of the Cascades, encompassing the central, eastern, and southern regions of the state, including Bend and Medford. The incumbent was Republican Greg Walden, who was re-elected with 56.3% of the vote in 2018.[2] On October 28, 2019 Walden announced that he would not seek re-election.[28]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Declined

Endorsements

Cliff Bentz
U.S. Representatives
Newspapers

Primary results

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cliff Bentz 37,488 31.3
Republican Knute Buehler 26,405 22.1
Republican Jason Atkinson 23,274 19.5
Republican Jimmy Crumpacker 21,507 18.0
Republican Travis A. Fager 4,265 3.6
Republican Jeff Smith 2,539 2.1
Republican Justin Livingston 1,350 1.1
Republican Mark R. Roberts 1,336 1.1
Republican Write-in 450 0.4
Republican David R. Campbell 418 0.3
Republican Glenn Carey 283 0.2
Republican Kenneth W. Medenbach 267 0.2
Total votes 119,582 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Nik Heuertz, small business owner[47]
  • John Holm, caregiver[43]
  • Jack Howard, attorney and former Union County commissioner[48]
  • Alex Spenser, activist and writer[49][50]
  • Chris Vaughn, sales representative[51]

Withdrawn

  • Raz Mason, political activist and candidate for Oregon's 2nd congressional district in 2018 (withdrawal effective January 1, 2020, her campaign strategist Alex Spenser will continue her campaign)[49][52]
  • Isabella Tibbetts, community organizer (withdrawal effective March 12, 2020)[53][54]
Declined

Endorsements

Nik Heuertz

Primary results

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Alex Spenser 23,482 32.1
Democratic Nick (Nik) L. Heurtz 22,685 31.0
Democratic Chris Vaughn 13,351 18.2
Democratic Jack Howard 6,047 8.3
Democratic John P. Holm 5,908 8.1
Democratic Write-in 1,734 2.4
Total votes 73,207 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Cliff Bentz (R)
U.S. Representative
State Legislators
Organizations

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[20] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[21] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[22] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[23] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[24] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[25] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[26] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Oregon's 2nd congressional district, 2020[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cliff Bentz 273,835 59.9
Democratic Alex Spenser 168,881 36.9
Libertarian Robert Werch 14,094 3.1
Write-in 623 0.1
Total votes 457,433 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The 3rd district encompasses the eastern Portland metro area, taking in Portland and Gresham. The incumbent is Democrat Earl Blumenauer, who was re-elected with 72.6% of the vote in 2018.[2] Running against him for the Republican Party is Joanna Harbour, while the Green Party candidate is author and civil rights activist Alex DiBlasi.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Earl Blumenauer
U.S. Representatives
Statewide officials
State legislators
Local officials
Individuals
Unions
Organizations
Newspapers

Primary results

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Earl Blumenauer (incumbent) 140,812 80.5
Democratic Albert Lee 29,311 16.8
Democratic Dane Wilcox 1,966 1.1
Democratic Matthew S. Davis 1,101 0.6
Democratic Charles Rand Barnett 953 0.5
Democratic Write-in 714 0.4
Total votes 174,857 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joanna Harbour 21,114 62.8
Republican Tom Harrison 7,751 23.1
Republican Frank Hecker 4,147 12.3
Republican Write-in 612 1.8
Total votes 33,624 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[20] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[21] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[22] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[23] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[24] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[25] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[26] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Oregon's 3rd congressional district, 2020[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Earl Blumenauer (incumbent) 343,574 73.0
Republican Joanna Harbour 110,570 23.5
Pacific Green Alex DiBlasi 8,872 1.9
Libertarian Josh Solomon 6,869 1.5
Write-in 621 0.1
Total votes 470,506 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4

The 4th district takes in the southern Willamette Valley and the South Coast, including Eugene, Corvallis, and Roseburg. The incumbent is Democrat Peter DeFazio, who was re-elected with 56.0% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn
  • Cassidy A Clausen, healthcare worker (withdrawal effective March 12, 2020)[73]

Endorsements

Primary results

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio (incumbent) 96,077 83.7
Democratic Doyle Elizabeth Canning 17,701 15.4
Democratic Write-in 974 0.9
Total votes 114,752 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
Withdrawn

Endorsements

Alek Skarlatos
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
Municipal officials
Organizations
Individuals

Primary results

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alek Skarlatos 70,599 86.4
Republican Nelson Ijih 10,325 12.6
Republican Write-in 780 1.0
Total votes 81,704 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[88] Lean D October 2, 2020
Inside Elections[21] Likely D October 1, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[22] Lean D October 15, 2020
RCP[25] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[26] Safe D June 7, 2020
Daily Kos[24] Safe D June 3, 2020
Politico[23] Lean D October 11, 2020

Results

Oregon's 4th congressional district, 2020[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio (incumbent) 240,950 51.5
Republican Alek Skarlatos 216,081 46.2
Pacific Green Daniel Hoffay 10,118 2.2
Write-in 556 0.1
Total votes 467,705 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5

The 5th district straddles the central coast, and includes Salem and the southern Portland suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Kurt Schrader, who was re-elected with 55.0% of the vote in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Mark Gamba
State legislators
Local officials
Individuals
Unions
Organizations
Parties
Newspapers
Kurt Schrader

Primary results

Democratic primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kurt Schrader (incumbent) 73,060 68.8
Democratic Mark F. Gamba 24,327 22.9
Democratic Blair G. Reynolds 7,910 7.5
Democratic Write-in 841 0.8
Total votes 106,138 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Shane Dinkel, computer trainer[94]
  • Joey Nations, tax policy analyst[95]
  • Angela Roman, businesswoman[96]
  • Amy Ryan Courser, former Keizer city councilor, businesswoman & community volunteer[97]

Endorsements

Shane Dinkel
Amy Ryan Courser

Primary results

Republican primary results[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Amy Ryan Courser 41,417 53.3
Republican G. Shane Dinkel 15,626 20.1
Republican Joey Nations 13,534 17.4
Republican Angela Roman 6,155 7.9
Republican Write-in 1,003 1.3
Total votes 77,735 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[20] Safe D July 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[22] Safe D July 2, 2020
RCP[25] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[26] Safe D June 7, 2020
Daily Kos[24] Safe D June 3, 2020
Inside Elections[21] Safe D June 2, 2020
Politico[23] Likely D April 19, 2020

Results

Oregon's 5th congressional district, 2020[27]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kurt Schrader (incumbent) 234,863 51.9
Republican Amy Ryan Courser 204,372 45.1
Libertarian Matthew Rix 12,640 2.8
Write-in 771 0.2
Total votes 452,646 100.0
Democratic hold

References

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External links

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
This page was last edited on 23 February 2021, at 06:27
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