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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 23 13
Seats won 23 13
Seat change Steady Steady

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the U.S. Senate and various state and local elections. Primaries were held on March 3 and run-offs were held on July 14.

District 1

The 1st district encompasses Deep East Texas, taking in Tyler, Lufkin, Nacogdoches, Longview, and Marshall. The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who was re-elected with 72.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Johnathan Davidson, data architect[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 83,887 89.7
Republican Johnathan Davidson 9,659 10.3
Total votes 93,546 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Hank Gilbert, rancher and businessman[5]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hank Gilbert 25,037 100.0
Total votes 25,037 100.0

Endorsements

Hank Gilbert (D)
Labor unions

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 16, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R July 21, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 1st congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 219,726 72.6
Democratic Hank Gilbert 83,016 27.4
Total votes 302,742 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The 2nd district is based in northern and western Houston. The incumbent is Republican Dan Crenshaw, who was elected with 52.8% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Crenshaw (incumbent) 53,938 100.0
Total votes 53,938 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Withdrew before runoff
  • Elisa Cardnell, U.S. Navy veteran and science teacher[18][19]
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sima Ladjevardian 26,536 47.6
Democratic Elisa Cardnell 17,279 31.0
Democratic Travis Olsen 11,881 21.4
Total votes 55,696 100.0

Runoff results

Elisa Cardnell suspended her campaign and unified behind Ladjevardian after advancing to runoff.[21]

Endorsements

Sima Ladjevardian (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
Federal Officials
Organizations
Publications

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely R October 21, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 25, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R October 20, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R October 11, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R April 29, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R October 25, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely R October 21, 2020

Results

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Crenshaw (incumbent) 192,828 55.6
Democratic Sima Ladjevardian 148,374 42.8
Libertarian Elliott Scheirman 5,524 1.6
Total votes 346,726 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The 3rd district is based in the suburbs north and northeast of Dallas, encompassing a large portion of Collin County including McKinney, Plano, and Frisco, as well as Collin County's share of Dallas itself. The incumbent is Republican Van Taylor, who was elected with 54.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Van Taylor (incumbent) 53,938 100.0
Total votes 53,938 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Lulu Seikaly, attorney[32]
Eliminated in runoff
  • Sean McCaffity, trial attorney[33]
Eliminated in primary
  • Tanner Do, activist and insurance adjuster[3]
Withdrawn

Primary results

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lulu Seikaly 28,250 44.6
Democratic Sean McCaffity 27,736 43.7
Democratic Tanner Do 7,433 11.7
Total votes 63,419 100.0

Runoff results

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lulu Seikaly 20,617 60.7
Democratic Sean McCaffity 13,339 39.3
Total votes 33,956 100.0

Libertarian primary

Nominee

  • Christopher Claytor

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Lean R November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Lean R November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Lean R November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Van
Taylor (R)
Lulu
Seikaly (D)
Christopher
Claytor (L)
Undecided
DCCC Targeting & Analytics Department (D)[A] October 19–22, 2020 432 (LV) ±  4.2% 42% 44% 8% 6%[b]
Global Strategy Group (D)[B] September 10–15, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 44% 43%
Public Opinion Strategies (R)[C] August 1–5, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.9% 48% 35% 8% 9%
Global Strategy Group (D)[D] July 17–20, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 43% 37% 5% 5%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Global Strategy Group (D)[E] July 17-20, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 45% 42%

Results

Texas's 3rd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Van Taylor (incumbent) 230,512 55.1
Democratic Lulu Seikaly 179,458 42.9
Libertarian Christopher Claytor 8,621 2.1
Total votes 418,591 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The 4th district encompasses Northeastern Texas taking in counties along the Red River and spreading to the parts of the northeastern exurbs of the Dallas–Fort Worth metro area. The incumbent is Republican John Ratcliffe, who was elected with 75.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

President Trump nominated Ratcliffe to succeed Dan Coats as the Director of National Intelligence in February 2020. The Senate confirmed his nomination in May, and Ratcliffe resigned from the House.[36] Republicans selected a new nominee on August 8. [37]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated at convention

Withdrawn

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe (incumbent) 92,373 100.0
Total votes 92,373 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Russell Foster, IT technician[44]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Russell Foster 24,970 100.0
Total votes 24,970 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 4th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pat Fallon 253,837 75.1
Democratic Russell Foster 76,326 22.6
Libertarian Lou Antonelli 6,334 1.9
Independent Tracy Jones (write-in) 1,306 0.4
Total votes 337,803 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The 5th district takes in the eastern edge of Dallas, as well as the surrounding rural areas. The incumbent is Republican Lance Gooden, who was elected with 62.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Don Hill, U.S. Army veteran[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lance Gooden (incumbent) 57,253 83.4
Republican Don Hill 11,372 16.6
Total votes 68,625 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carolyn Salter 34,641 100.0
Total votes 34,641 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 5th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lance Gooden (incumbent) 173,836 62.0
Democratic Carolyn Salter 100,743 35.9
Libertarian Kevin Hale 5,834 2.1
Total votes 280,413 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The 6th district takes in parts of Arlington and rural areas south of Dallas including Ellis County. The incumbent is Republican Ron Wright, who was elected with 53.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ron Wright (incumbent) 55,759 100.0
Total votes 55,759 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Stephen Daniel, attorney[47]

Endorsements

Stephen Daniel
State officials
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stephen Daniel 47,996 100.0
Total votes 47,996 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely R November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Likely R November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely R November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Ron
Wright (R)
Stephen
Daniel (D)
Undecided
GBAO Strategies (D)[F] October 13–17, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 45% 41%
DCCC Targeting & Analytics (D)[G] June 24–28, 2020 376 (LV) ± 4.8% 45% 41% 15%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Other
GBAO Strategies/Stephen Daniel[F] October 13–17, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 46% 44%
DCCC[G] June 24–28, 2020 376 (LV) 45% 46% 9%[c]

Results

Texas's 6th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ron Wright (incumbent) 179,507 52.8
Democratic Stephen Daniel 149,530 44.0
Libertarian Melanie Black 10,955 3.2
Total votes 339,992 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The 7th district covers western Houston and its suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Lizzie Fletcher, who flipped the district and was elected with 52.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lizzie Fletcher (incumbent) 55,253 100.0
Total votes 55,253 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wesley Hunt 28,060 61.0
Republican Cindy Siegel 12,497 27.2
Republican Maria Espinoza 2,716 5.9
Republican Kyle Preston 1,363 3.0
Republican Jim Noteware 937 2.0
Republican Laique Rehman 424 0.9
Total votes 45,997 100.0

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Lizzie
Pannill Fletcher (D)
Wesley
Hunt (R)
Shawn
Kelly (L)
Undecided
GS Strategy Group (R)[H] October 13–15, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 46% 44% 3% 7%
Remington Research Group (R)[I] March 4–5, 2020 1,044 (LV) ± 3% 45% 45% 10%
TargetPoint Consulting (R)[J] August 10–11, 2019 336 (LV) ± 5.3% 43% 45%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Opponent
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Lizzie
Pannill Fletcher (D)
Generic Opponent Undecided
Remington Research Group (R) Mar 4–5, 2020 1,044 (LV) ± 3% 42% 41%[d] 17%

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely D November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Lean D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Likely D November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely D November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely D November 2 2020
RCP[13] Lean D November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely D November 2, 2020

Endorsements

Lizzie Fletcher (D)
U.S. Presidents
Federal Officials
Unions
Organizations
Wesley Hunt (R)
Federal Officials
  • Ted Cruz, U.S. Senator from Texas; former 2016 presidential candidate[68]
Individuals
Organizations

Results

Texas's 7th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lizzie Fletcher (incumbent) 159,529 50.8
Republican Wesley Hunt 149,054 47.4
Libertarian Shawn Kelly 5,542 1.8
Total votes 314,125 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

The 8th district encompasses the suburbs and exurbs north of Houston, taking in Spring, The Woodlands, Conroe, and Huntsville. The incumbent is Republican Kevin Brady, who was re-elected with 73.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Melissa Esparza-Mathis, U.S. Army veteran[72]
  • Kirk Osborn, consultant[3]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 8th congressional district Republican primary results by county  Brady .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Brady—80–90%   Brady—70–80%
2020 Texas's 8th congressional district Republican primary results by county
Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 75,044 80.7
Republican Kirk Osborn 15,048 16.2
Republican Melissa Esparza-Mathis 2,860 3.1
Total votes 92,952 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Elizabeth Hernandez, accounts payable associate[73]
Eliminated in primary
  • Laura Jones, realtor[73]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 8th congressional district Democratic primary results by county  Hernandez   Hernandez—60–70%   Hernandez—50–60%    Jones   Jones—50–60%
2020 Texas's 8th congressional district Democratic primary results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Elizabeth Hernandez 18,660 59.8
Democratic Laura Jones 12,519 40.2
Total votes 31,179 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 8th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 277,327 72.5
Democratic Elizabeth Hernandez 97,409 25.5
Libertarian Chris Duncan 7,735 2.0
Total votes 382,471 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The 9th district encompasses southwestern Houston. The incumbent is Democrat Al Green, who was re-elected with 89.1% of the vote in 2018, without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Melissa Wilson-Williams, real estate broker[3]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 48,387 83.6
Democratic Melissa Wilson-Williams 9,511 16.4
Total votes 57,898 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Johnny Teague, rancher[3]
Eliminated in primary
  • Julian Martinez, auto repairman[3]
  • Jon Menefee, IT consultant[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Johnny Teague 6,149 58.7
Republican Jon Menefee 2,519 24.0
Republican Julian Martinez 1,809 17.3
Total votes 10,477 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 9th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 172,938 75.5
Republican Johnny Teague 49,575 21.6
Libertarian Joe Sosa 6,594 2.9
Total votes 229,107 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

Early voter in Harris County, Texas
Early voter in Harris County, Texas

The 10th district stretches from northwest Harris County to northern Austin and Pflugerville. The incumbent is Republican Michael McCaul, who was re-elected in 2018 with 51.1% of the vote to Democrat Mike Siegel's 47.8%,[1] the closest contest McCaul had faced.[74] McCaul joined a last-minute suit to strike the names of Roy Ericksen, who was nominated by the Libertarian party convention on March 21, 2020, and those of other similarly situated congressional candidates, from the November 3, 2020, ballot.[75][76]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 60,323 100.0
Total votes 60,323 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Pritesh Gandhi, physician
Eliminated in primary
  • Shannon Hutcheson, attorney

Endorsements

Mike Siegel
Federal officials
State officials
Labor unions
Newspapers
Organizations
Individuals
Pritesh Gandhi
Federal officials
Newspapers
Organizations
Shannon Hutcheson (eliminated)
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Siegel 35,651 44.0
Democratic Pritesh Gandhi 26,818 33.1
Democratic Shannon Hutcheson 18,578 22.9
Total votes 81,047 100.0

Runoff results

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Siegel 26,799 54.2
Democratic Pritesh Gandhi 22,629 45.8
Total votes 49,428 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Michael McCaul (R)
Organizations
Newspapers and Publications
Mike Siegel (D)
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Organizations
Unions
Newspapers and Publications

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Michael
McCaul (R)
Mike
Siegel (D)
Roy
Eriksen (L)
Undecided
GBAO Strategies (D)[K] October 8–11, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 47% 45%
GBAO Strategies (D)[K] September 21–24, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 45% 43% 6%
RMG Research July 28 – August 3, 2020 500 (RV) ± 4.5% 46% 39% 15%
Hypothetical polling
with Shannon Hutcheson
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Michael
McCaul (R)
Shannon
Hutcheson (D)
Undecided
Remington Research (R)[J] November 6–7, 2019 848 (LV) ± 3.4% 50% 41% 9%
with Generic Democrat and Generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] September 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 49% 46%

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Tossup November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Lean R November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Lean R November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Tossup November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Lean R November 2, 2020

Results

Texas's 10th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 217,216 52.5
Democratic Mike Siegel 187,686 45.3
Libertarian Roy Eriksen 8,992 2.2
Total votes 413,894 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

The 11th district is based in midwestern Texas, including Lamesa, Midland, Odessa, San Angelo, Granbury, and Brownwood. The incumbent is Republican Mike Conaway, who was re-elected with 80.1% of the vote in 2018,[1] subsequently announced he would not seek re-election on July 31, 2019.[109]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Gene Barber, U.S. Army veteran[3]
  • Brandon Batch, businessman[111]
  • Jamie Berryhill, businessman and founder of Mission Messiah Women & Children's Program[112]
  • Cynthia J. Breyman, banker[73]
  • J.D. Faircloth, former mayor of Midland[113]
  • Casey Gray, U.S. Navy veteran[3]
  • J. Ross Lacy, Midland city councilman[114]
  • Ned Luscombe, registered nurse[3]
  • Robert Tucker, retiree[3]
  • Wesley Virdell, U.S. Air Force Veteran and businessman[115]
Declined

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican August Pfluger 56,093 52.2
Republican Brandon Batch 16,224 15.1
Republican Wesley W. Virdell 7,672 7.1
Republican Jamie Berryhill 7,496 7.0
Republican J. Ross Lacy 4,785 4.4
Republican J.D. Faircloth 4,257 4.0
Republican Casey Gray 4,064 3.8
Republican Robert Tucker 3,137 2.9
Republican Ned Luscombe 2,066 1.9
Republican Gene Barber 1,641 1.5
Total votes 107,435 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Jon Mark Hogg, lawyer[115]
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon Mark Hogg 16,644 100.0
Total votes 16,644 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Wacey Alpha Cody (Libertarian), competitive horse rider[119]

Endorsements

August Pfluger (R)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Federal Executive Officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State and local officials
Organizations

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 11th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican August Pfluger 232,568 79.7
Democratic Jon Mark Hogg 53,394 18.3
Libertarian Wacey Alpha Cody 5,811 2.0
Total votes 291,773 100.0
Republican hold

District 12

The 12th district is located in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, and takes in Parker County and western Tarrant County, including parts of Fort Worth and its inner suburbs of North Richland Hills, Saginaw, and Haltom City. The incumbent is Republican Kay Granger, who was re-elected with 64.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Endorsements
Chris Putnam
Organizations
Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Kay
Granger
Chris
Putnam
Undecided
Remington Research Group (R)[J] December 17–18, 2019 686 (LV) ± 3.7% 62% 16% 22%

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (incumbent) 43,240 58.0
Republican Chris Putnam 31,420 42.0
Total votes 74,840 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Lisa Welch, college professor[125]
Eliminated in primary
  • Danny Anderson, aircraft assembler[3]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lisa Welch 36,750 81.1
Democratic Danny Anderson 8,588 18.9
Total votes 45,338 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Trey Holcomb (Libertarian), conservative activist, educator and former high school football and baseball coach

Endorsements

Kay Granger (R)
U.S. Presidents
Organizations
Lisa Welch (D)
Labor unions
  • Texas AFL-CIO[6]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 12th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (incumbent) 233,853 63.7
Democratic Lisa Welch 121,250 33.0
Libertarian Trey Holcomb 11,918 3.3
Total votes 367,021 100.0
Republican hold

District 13

The 13th district encompasses most of the Texas Panhandle, containing the cities of Amarillo, Gainesville and Wichita Falls. The incumbent is Republican Mac Thornberry, who was re-elected with 81.5% of the vote in 2018.[1] On September 30, 2019, Thornberry announced he would not be seeking re-election.[129]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Josh Winegarner, director of governmental relations for the Texas Cattle Feeders Association and former aide to U.S. Senator John Cornyn and former U.S. Senator Phil Gramm[131]
Eliminated in primary
Withdrew
  • Kevin McInturff, non-profit worker[143]
Declined

Endorsements

Chris Ekstrom (eliminated)
Organizations
Elaine Hays (eliminated)
Organizations
Ronny Jackson
Federal officials
State officials
Organizations
Individuals
Josh Winegarner
Federal officials
State officials
Organizations
Individuals

Primary results

2020 Texas's 13th congressional district Republican primary results by county  Winegarner   Winegarner—70–80%   Winegarner—60–70%   Winegarner—50–60%   Winegarner—40–50%   Winegarner—30–40%   Winegarner—<30%    Hays   Hays—<30%    Neese   Neese—<30%    Harvey   Harvey—40–50%
2020 Texas's 13th congressional district Republican primary results by county
Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Josh Winegarner 39,130 39.0
Republican Ronny Jackson 20,048 20.0
Republican Chris Ekstrom 15,387 15.3
Republican Elaine Hays 7,701 7.7
Republican Lee Harvey 3,841 3.8
Republican Vance Snider II 3,506 3.5
Republican Mark Neese 2,984 3.0
Republican Matt McArthur 1,816 1.8
Republican Diane Knowlton 1,464 1.5
Republican Richard Herman 915 0.9
Republican Asusena Reséndiz 818 0.8
Republican Jamie Culley 779 0.8
Republican Monique Worthy 748 0.7
Republican Catherine "I Swear" Carr 707 0.7
Republican Jason Foglesong 579 0.6
Total votes 100,423 100.0

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Ronny
Jackson
Josh
Winegarner
Undecided
Fabrizio, Lee & Associates (R)[M] June 27–28, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 46% 29%
WPA Intelligence (R)[N] June 17–18, 2020 408 (LV) ± 4.9% 49% 41% 10%
WPA Intelligence (R)[N] May 11–12, 2020 – (V)[e] 36% 47% 17%

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ronny Jackson 36,684 55.6
Republican Josh Winegarner 29,327 44.4
Total votes 66,011 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Gus Trujillo, office manager[160]
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
  • Timothy W. Gassaway, retiree[160]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 13th congressional district Democratic primary initial round results by county  Trujillo   Trujillo—60–70%   Trujillo—50–60%   Trujillo—40–50%   Trujillo—30–40%    Tie   Trujillo/Sagan tie—30–40%   Trujillo/Sagan tie—40–50%   Trujillo/Sagan tie—50–60%   Trujillo/Gassaway tie—40–50%    Sagan   Sagan—30–40%   Sagan—40–50%   Sagan—60–70%    Gassaway   Gassaway—30–40%
2020 Texas's 13th congressional district Democratic primary initial round results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gus Trujillo 6,998 42.1
Democratic Greg Sagan 5,773 34.7
Democratic Timothy W. Gassaway 3,854 23.2
Total votes 16,625 100.0

Runoff results

Greg Sagan withdrew from the race on March 12, 2020, but remained on the ballot in the runoff. [162]

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gus Trujillo 4,988 66.4
Democratic Greg Sagan 2,529 33.6
Total votes 7,517 100.0

Libertarian primary

Candidates

Declared

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 13th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ronny Jackson 217,124 79.4
Democratic Gus Trujillo 50,477 18.5
Libertarian Jack B. Westbrook 5,907 2.1
Total votes 273,508 100.0
Republican hold

District 14

The 14th district takes in the southern and southeastern region of Greater Houston, including Galveston, Jefferson County and southern Brazoria County. The incumbent is Republican Randy Weber, who was re-elected with 59.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Joshua Foxworth, businessman[164]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 51,837 85.4
Republican Joshua Foxworth 8,856 14.6
Total votes 60,693 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adrienne Bell 26,152 61.8
Democratic Eddie Fisher 4,967 11.7
Democratic Sanjanetta Barnes 4,482 10.6
Democratic Mikal Williams 4,055 9.6
Democratic Robert Thomas 2,640 6.2
Total votes 42,296 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Adrienne Bell (D)
U.S. Presidents
Organizations

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 14th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 190,541 61.6
Democratic Adrienne Bell 118,574 38.4
Total votes 309,115 100.0
Republican hold

District 15

The 15th district stretches from McAllen in the Rio Grande Valley, northward into rural counties in the Greater San Antonio area. The incumbent is Democrat Vicente Gonzalez, who was re-elected with 59.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vicente Gonzalez (incumbent) 44,444 100.0
Total votes 44,444 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Monica de la Cruz-Hernandez, insurance agent[3]
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
  • Tim Westley, university instructor and nominee for Texas's 15th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Monica de la Cruz-Hernandez 11,338 43.1
Republican Ryan Krause 10,452 39.7
Republican Tim Westley 4,539 17.2
Total votes 26,329 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Monica de la Cruz-Hernandez 7,423 76.0
Republican Ryan Krause 2,350 24.0
Total votes 9,773 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 15th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vicente Gonzalez (incumbent) 115,605 50.5
Republican Monica De la Cruz-Hernandez 109,017 47.6
Libertarian Ross Lynn Leone 4,295 1.9
Total votes 228,917 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16

The 16th district is located entirely within El Paso County, taking in El Paso, Horizon City, and Anthony. The incumbent is Democrat Veronica Escobar, who was elected with 68.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Veronica Escobar (incumbent) 54,910 100.0
Total votes 54,910 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Irene Armendariz-Jackson, realtor[169]
Eliminated in runoff
  • Samuel Williams, U.S. Army veteran[169]
Eliminated in primary
  • Anthony Aguero, videographer[169]
  • Jaime Arriola Jr., nurse[169]
  • Patrick Cigarruista, financial advisor[169]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Samuel Williams 5,097 31.3
Republican Irene Armendariz-Jackson 4,147 25.4
Republican Anthony Aguero 2,184 13.4
Republican Jaime Arriola Jr. 2,115 13.0
Republican Patrick Cigarruista 1,100 6.8
Total votes 16,305 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Irene Armendariz-Jackson 5,170 65.4
Republican Samuel Williams 2,731 34.6
Total votes 7,901 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 16th congressional district,2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Veronica Escobar (incumbent) 154,108 64.7
Republican Irene Armendariz-Jackson 84,006 35.3
Total votes 238,114 100.0
Democratic hold

District 17

The 17th district covers parts of suburban north Austin stretching to rural central Texas, including Waco and Bryan-College Station. The incumbent is Republican Bill Flores, who was re-elected with 56.8% of the vote in 2018.[1] On September 4, 2019, Flores announced that he will not be running for re-election to spend more time with his family.[170]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Renée Swann, healthcare executive[172]
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Endorsements

Pete Sessions
Organizations
Renée Swann
Federal officials
State officials
Organizations

Primary results

2020 Texas's 17th congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county  Sessions   Sessions—50–60%   Sessions—40–50%   Sessions—30–40%   Sessions—<30%    Swann   Swann—30–40%    Hindman   Hindman—<30%
2020 Texas's 17th congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county
Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 21,706 31.6
Republican Renée Swann 13,072 19.0
Republican George W. Hindman 12,405 18.1
Republican Elianor Vessali 6,286 9.2
Republican Scott Bland 4,947 7.2
Republican Trent Sutton 3,662 5.3
Republican Todd Kent 2,367 3.5
Republican Kristen Alamo Rowin 1,183 1.7
Republican Laurie Godfrey McReynolds 1,105 1.6
Republican David Saucedo 975 1.4
Republican Jeff Oppenheim 483 0.7
Republican Ahmad Adnan 477 0.7
Total votes 68,668 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 18,524 53.5
Republican Renée Swann 16,096 46.5
Total votes 34,620 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
  • William Foster III, educator and former NASA employee[172]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 17th congressional district Democratic primary initial round results by county  Kennedy   Kennedy—60–70%   Kennedy—50–60%   Kennedy—40–50%    Foster   Foster—50–60%
2020 Texas's 17th congressional district Democratic primary initial round results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Kennedy 22,148 47.9
Democratic David Anthony Jaramillo 16,170 35.0
Democratic William Foster III 7,887 17.1
Total votes 46,205 100.0

Runoff results

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Kennedy 13,496 57.3
Democratic David Anthony Jaramillo 10,054 42.7
Total votes 23,550 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Ted Brown (Libertarian), small business owner and insurance claims adjuster

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R October 21, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 30, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R October 20, 2020
Politico[11] Likely R October 11, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R April 29, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R October 30, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R October 29, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Pete
Sessions (R)
Rick
Kennedy (D)
Undecided
Lincoln Park Strategies (D)[1][O] August 22–23, 2020 1,160 (LV) ±  4.38% 45% 42% 13%

Results

Texas's 17th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions 171,390 55.9
Democratic Rick Kennedy 125,565 40.9
Libertarian Ted Brown 9,918 3.2
Total votes 306,873 100.0
Republican hold

District 18

The 18th district is based in Downtown Houston and takes in the heavily black areas of Central Houston. The incumbent is Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, who was re-elected with 75.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Michael Allen, landscape architect[3]
  • Donovan Boson, public administrator[3]
  • Marc Flores, construction manager[3]
  • Jerry Ford Sr., businessman[3]
  • Stevens Orozco, teacher[187]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 49,729 77.1
Democratic Marc Flores 5,353 8.3
Democratic Bimal Patel 2,456 3.8
Democratic Jerry Ford Sr. 2,417 3.7
Democratic Stevens Orozco 2,180 3.4
Democratic Michael Allen 1,672 2.6
Democratic Donovan Boson 709 1.1
Total votes 64,516 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Wendell Champion, attorney and U.S Army veteran[3]
Eliminated in runoff
  • Robert Cadena, businessman[3]
Eliminated in primary
  • Nellie Heiksell, minister[3]
  • T.C. Manning, service technician[3]
  • Nathan Milliron, attorney[3]
  • Ava Reynero Pate, candidate for Texas's 18th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wendell Champion 3,428 35.1
Republican Robert Cadena 2,005 20.5
Republican T.C. Manning 1,823 18.7
Republican Nathan Milliron 1,076 11.0
Republican Ava Reynero Pate 794 8.1
Republican Nellie Heiksell 638 6.5
Total votes 9,764 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wendell Champion 4,000 71.8
Republican Robert Cadena 1,570 28.2
Total votes 5,570 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 18th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 180,952 73.3
Republican Wendell Champion 58,033 23.5
Libertarian Luke Spencer 4,514 1.8
Independent Vince Duncan 3,396 1.4
Total votes 246,895 100.0
Democratic hold

District 19

The 19th district encompasses rural West Texas, taking in Lubbock. The incumbent is Republican Jodey Arrington, who was re-elected with 75.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Vance Boyd, stuntman[188]
Not on ballot

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jodey Arrington (incumbent) 71,234 89.4
Republican Vance Boyd 8,410 10.6
Total votes 79,644 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Tom Watson, attorney[188]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Watson 19,993 100.0
Total votes 19,993 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 19th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jodey Arrington (incumbent) 198,198 74.8
Democratic Tom Watson 60,583 22.9
Libertarian Joe Burnes 6,271 2.4
Total votes 265,052 100.0
Republican hold

District 20

The 20th district encompasses downtown San Antonio. The incumbent is Democrat Joaquin Castro, who was re-elected with 80.9% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Rob Hostetler, U.S. Air Force veteran[3]
  • Justin Lecea, co-op manager[3]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquín Castro (incumbent) 61,861 92.1
Democratic Justin Lecea 3,047 4.5
Democratic Rob Hostetler 2,252 3.4
Total votes 67,160 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Gary Allen, retired teacher[3]
Eliminated in primary
  • Dominick Dina, real estate agent[191]
  • Anita Kegley, construction business owner[191]
  • Tammy Orta, registered nurse[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mauro Garza 7,720 33.3
Republican Gary Allen 6,230 26.9
Republican Dominick Dina 5,242 22.6
Republican Anita Kegley 2,210 9.5
Republican Tammy Orta 1,786 7.7
Total votes 23,188 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mauro Garza 7,162 60.1
Republican Gary Allen 4,762 39.9
Total votes 11,924 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 20th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquín Castro (incumbent) 175,078 64.7
Republican Mauro Garza 89,628 33.1
Libertarian Jeffrey Blunt 6,017 2.2
Total votes 270,723 100.0
Democratic hold

District 21

The 21st district extends from north San Antonio to central and south Austin, taking in rural parts of the Texas Hill Country. The Democratic nominee is former Texas state senator and 2014 gubernatorial nominee, Wendy Davis. Perennial candidate Arthur DiBianca was nominated by the Libertarian party convention on March 21, 2020.[192] The incumbent is Republican Chip Roy, who was elected with 50.2% of the vote in 2018.[1] Roy joined a last-minute suit to strike the names of DiBianca and those of other similarly situated Texas Libertarian party congressional candidates, from the November 3, 2020, ballot.[193]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy (incumbent) 75,389 100.0
Total votes 75,389 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared
Eliminated in runoff

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Wendy Davis 84,593 86.3
Democratic Jennie Lou Leeder 13,485 13.7
Total votes 98,078 100.0

Endorsements

Wendy Davis (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Labor Unions
Newspapers
Organizations
Chip Roy (R)
U.S. Federal Executive Officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Governors
Municipal Officials
Individuals
Labor Unions
Organizations

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Tossup November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Lean R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Tossup November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Tossup November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Tossup November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Tossup November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Tossup November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Chip
Roy (R)
Wendy
Davis (D)
Other Undecided
WPA Intelligence (R)[P] October 11–12, 2020 412 (LV) 47% 42% 3% 8%
Garin-Hart-Yang Research (D)[Q] August 31 – September 4, 2020 401 (LV) ±  5% 47% 48%
ALG Research (D)[R] August 15–20, 2020 500 (LV) ±  4.4% 46% 46%
Garin-Hart-Yang Research (D)[S] July 14–17, 2020 500 (LV) ±  4.25% 46% 45%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Democrat and Generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] September 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 44% 49%

Results

Texas's 21st congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy (incumbent) 235,740 52.0
Democratic Wendy Davis 205,780 45.3
Libertarian Arthur DiBlanca 8,666 1.9
Green Tom Wakely 3,564 0.8
Total votes 453,750 100.0
Republican hold

District 22

The 22nd district encompasses the south-central Greater Houston metropolitan area, including the southern Houston suburbs of Sugar Land, Pearland, and Webster. Incumbent Republican Pete Olson was re-elected with 51.4% of the vote in 2018, his narrowest victory ever,[1] and announced on July 25, 2019 that he would not seek re-election.[211]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
Declined
Endorsements
Pierce Bush (eliminated)
Federal officials
State officials
Individuals
Troy Nehls
Individuals
Newspapers
Organizations
Kathaleen Wall (eliminated)
Federal officials
State officials
Organizations

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Troy Nehls 29,538 40.5
Republican Kathaleen Wall 14,201 19.4
Republican Pierce Bush 11,281 15.4
Republican Greg Hill 10,315 14.1
Republican Dan Mathews 2,165 3.0
Republican Bangar Reddy 1,144 1.6
Republican Joe Walz 1,039 1.4
Republican Shandon Phan 773 1.1
Republican Diana Miller 771 1.0
Republican Jon Camarillo 718 1.0
Republican Douglas Haggard 398 0.5
Republican Howard Steele 283 0.4
Republican Matt Hinton 274 0.4
Republican Brandon T. Penko 96 0.1
Republican Aaron Hermes 92 0.1
Total votes 73,133 100.0

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Troy
Nehls
Kathaleen
Wall
Undecided
Remington Research Group (R)[T] March 7–8, 2020 507 (LV) ± 4.4% 61% 28% 11%

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Troy Nehls 36,132 69.9
Republican Kathaleen Wall 15,547 30.1
Total votes 51,679 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Chris Fernandez, retiree[237]
  • Nyanza Davis Moore, television news commentator and attorney[238]
  • Carmine Petricco III, former electrician[3]
  • Derrick Reed, Pearland city councilman[239]
Endorsements
Sri Preston Kulkarni
Cabinet-level Officials
U.S. State Department Officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State officials
County Officials
Local officials
Labor unions
Newspapers
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sri Preston Kulkarni 34,664 53.1
Democratic Derrick Reed 16,126 24.7
Democratic Nyanza Davis Moore 9,449 14.5
Democratic Carmine Petricco III 5,074 7.8
Total votes 65,313 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Tossup November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Lean R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Tossup November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Tossup November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Tossup November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Tossup November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Tossup November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Troy
Nehls (R)
Sri Preston
Kulkarni (D)
Joseph
LeBlanc (L)
Other Undecided
GBAO Strategies (D) October 8–11, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 43% 48% 4% 5%
GBAO Strategies (D) September 24–27, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 44% 47% 3%
GBAO Strategies (D) Mid August, 2020 – (V)[f] 45% 46% 3%
GBAO Strategies (D) Early August, 2020 – (V)[g] 46% 43% 6%
GBAO Strategies (D) July 29 – August 2, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 46% 46% 2%[h] 6%
RMG Research July 27 – August 2, 2020 500 (RV) ± 4.5% 39% 39% 22%
Meeting Street Insights (R)[J] July 19–22, 2020 400 (RV) ± 4.9% 44% 32% 5% 17%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Democrat and Generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] Sep 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 45% 49%
Endorsements
Sri Preston Kulkarni (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
Cabinet-level Officials
U.S. State Department Officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State officials
County Officials
Local officials
Labor unions
Organizations
Troy Nehls (R)
U.S. Presidents
Individuals
Organizations

Results

Texas's 22nd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Troy Nehls 210,259 51.5
Democratic Sri Preston Kulkarni 181,998 44.6
Libertarian Joseph LeBlanc Jr. 15,791 3.9
Total votes 408,048 100.0
Republican hold

District 23

The 23rd district covers southwestern Texas, including the Big Bend, the southern and western San Antonio suburbs, and the southwestern El Paso suburbs. The incumbent Republican Will Hurd, who was re-elected with 49.2% of the vote in 2018,[1] subsequently announced he would not seek re-election on August 1, 2019.[262]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
  • Raul Reyes, U.S. Air Force veteran[115]
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Endorsements

Tony Gonzales
Federal officials
  • Dan Crenshaw, U.S. Representative (TX-02)[270]
  • Phil Gramm, former U.S. Senator from Texas (1985–2002) and U.S. Representative (D-TX-06) (1979–1983) (R-TX-06) (1983–1985)[271]
  • Will Hurd, U.S. Representative (R-TX-23)[272]
  • Kevin McCarthy, U.S. Representative (CA-23) and House Minority Leader, former House Majority Leader (2014–2019) and House Minority Whip (2011–2014)[270]
  • Steve Scalise, U.S. Representative (LA-01) and House Minority Whip, former House Majority Whip (2014–2019)[270]
  • Pete Sessions, former U.S. Representative from (TX-05) (1997–2003) and (TX-32) (2003–2019)[270]
Newspapers
Raul Reyes
Federal officials
Organizations

Primary results

2020 Texas's 23rd congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county  Gonzales   Gonzales—40–50%   Gonzales—30–40%   Gonzales—<30%    Reyes   Reyes—30–40%   Reyes—40–50%    Arredondo-Lynch   Arredondo-Lynch—<30%   Arredondo-Lynch—30–40%   Arredondo-Lynch—40–50%    McFarlin   McFarlin—<30%    Jones   Jones—<30%
2020 Texas's 23rd congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county
Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tony Gonzales 11,522 28.1
Republican Raul Reyes 9,555 23.3
Republican Alma Arredondo-Lynch 5,391 13.2
Republican Ben Van Winkle 4,427 10.8
Republican Jeff McFarlin 4,241 10.3
Republican Sharon Thomas 2,511 6.1
Republican Cecil Jones 1,552 3.8
Republican Alia Ureste 1,039 2.5
Republican Darwin Boedeker 745 1.8
Total votes 40,983 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tony Gonzales 12,342 50.09
Republican Raul Reyes 12,297 49.91
Total votes 24,639 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Endorsements

Gina Ortiz Jones
Federal politicians
State officials
Local officials
Labor Unions
Newspapers
Organizations

Primary results

2020 Texas's 23rd congressional district Democratic primary results by county  Jones   Jones—70–80%   Jones—60–70%   Jones—50–60%   Jones—40–50%
2020 Texas's 23rd congressional district Democratic primary results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gina Ortiz Jones 41,718 66.4
Democratic Efrain Valdez 6,964 11.1
Democratic Rosalinda Ramos Abuabara 6,896 11.0
Democratic Ricardo Madrid 4,518 7.2
Democratic Jaime Escuder 2,725 4.3
Total votes 62,821 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Tony Gonzales (R)
Federal officials
  • Dan Crenshaw, U.S. Representative (TX-02)[270]
  • Phil Gramm, former U.S. Senator from Texas (1985–2002) and U.S. Representative (D-TX-06) (1979–1983) (R-TX-06) (1983–1985)[271]
  • Will Hurd, U.S. Representative (R-TX-23)[272]
  • Kevin McCarthy, U.S. Representative (CA-23) and House Minority Leader, former House Majority Leader (2014–2019) and House Minority Whip (2011–2014)[270]
  • Steve Scalise, U.S. Representative (LA-01) and House Minority Whip, former House Majority Whip (2014–2019)[270]
  • Pete Sessions, former U.S. Representative from (TX-05) (1997–2003) and (TX-32) (2003–2019)[270]
Newspapers
Gina Ortiz Jones (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
Federal politicians
State officials
Local officials
Labor Unions
Organizations

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Tilt D (flip) November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Tossup November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Tony
Gonzales (R)
Gina
Jones (D)
Beto
Villela (L)
Undecided
Public Opinion Strategies (R)[U] October 3–5, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 41% 42% 3%
Public Opinion Strategies (R)[U] August 6–9, 2020 400 (RV) ± 4.9% 40% 41%
Remington Research Group (R) May 19–20, 2020 669 (LV) ± 3.75% 43% 45% 12%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Democrat and Generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Undecided
Public Opinion Strategies (R)[V] August 6–9, 2020 400 (V) ± 4.9% 43% 47%
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] September 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 41% 53%

Results

Texas's 23rd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tony Gonzales 149,395 50.6
Democratic Gina Ortiz Jones 137,693 46.6
Libertarian Beto Villela 8,369 2.8
Total votes 295,457 100.0
Republican hold

District 24

The 24th district encompasses the suburbs north of Fort Worth and Dallas, including Grapevine, Carrollton, parts of Irving, and northwestern Dallas. The incumbent is Republican Kenny Marchant, who was re-elected with 50.6% of the vote in 2018.[1] Marchant announced he would not seek re-election on August 5, 2019.[301]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Sunny Chaparala, realtor[115]
  • David Fegan, property manager[303]
  • Jeron Liverman, realtor[3]
  • Desi Maes, U.S. Army Ranger veteran[304]
Declined

Endorsements

Beth Van Duyne (R)
Executive Officials
Organizations

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Beth Van Duyne 32,067 64.3
Republican David Fegan 10,295 20.7
Republican Desi Maes 2,867 5.7
Republican Sunny Chaparala 2,808 5.6
Republican Jeron Liverman 1,809 3.6
Total votes 49,846 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
Withdrew
  • Crystal Fletcher, lawyer[315]
  • Will Fisher, former candidate for Texas's 26th congressional district in 2018[316]

Endorsements

Kim Olson
Federal politicians
Labor unions
  • Texas AFL-CIO (also endorsed Candace Valenzuela)[6]
Newspapers
Organizations
Candace Valenzuela
Federal politicians
Labor unions
Organizations

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Crystal
Fletcher
Jan
McDowell
Kim
Olson
Candace
Valenzuela
Other
Bold PAC/The Hill[W] Released on October 28, 2019 – (V)[e] 10%[i] 9% 12% 14% [e]
[j][e] [e] 8% 29% [e]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kim Olson 24,442 41.0
Democratic Candace Valenzuela 18,078 30.4
Democratic Jan McDowell 5,965 10.0
Democratic Crystal Fletcher (withdrawn) 3,386 5.7
Democratic Richard Fleming 3,010 5.1
Democratic Sam Vega 2,677 4.5
Democratic John Biggan 1,996 3.4
Total votes 59,554 100.0

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Kim
Olson
Candace
Valenzuela
Undecided
Data for Progress (D)[W] July 2–7, 2020 440 (LV) ± 4.7% 37% 52% 11%

Runoff results

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Candace Valenzuela 20,003 60.4
Democratic Kim Olson 13,131 39.6
Total votes 33,134 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Mark Bauer (Independent), journalist[324]
  • Steve Kuzmich (Independent), attorney[325]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Tossup November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Tilt D (flip) November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Tossup November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Tossup November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Lean D (flip) November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Beth Van
Duyne (R)
Candace
Valenzuela (D)
Other/Undecided
Victoria Research & Consulting (D)[X] July 31 – August 2, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 41% 47% 10%[k]
RMG Research/Term Limits July 27 – August 2, 2020 500 (RV) ± 4.5% 36% 36% 27%
DCCC Targeting and Analytics (D)[G] June 11–15, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.4% 39% 45%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Other Undecided
Victoria Research & Consulting (D)[X] July 31 – August 2, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 44% 46% 4%[l] 6%
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] Sep 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 46% 47%

Endorsements

Beth Van Duyne (R)
Executive Officials
Organizations
Candace Valenzuela (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
Federal politicians
State politicians
Labor unions
Organizations

Results

Texas's 24th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Beth Van Duyne 167,910 48.8
Democratic Candace Valenzuela 163,326 47.5
Libertarian Darren Hamilton 5,647 1.6
Independent Steve Kuzmich 4,229 1.2
Independent Mark Bauer 2,909 0.9
Total votes 344,021 100.0
Republican hold

District 25

The 25th district runs from north Austin through rural areas of Texas Hill Country northward into southern Fort Worth suburbs. The incumbent is Republican Roger Williams, who was re-elected with 53.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Keith Neuendorff, software engineer[73]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 63,146 87.6
Republican Keith Neuendorff 8,965 12.4
Total votes 72,111 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Heidi Sloan, community organizer and farmer[335]

Endorsements

Julie Oliver (D)
Federal officials
Heidi Sloan (D)
Labor Unions
Publications
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Julie Oliver 56,151 69.6
Democratic Heidi Sloan 24,512 30.4
Total votes 80,663 100.0

General election

Endorsements

Julie Oliver (D)
Executive Branch Officials
  • Joe Biden, former Vice President (2009-2017) and Democratic nominee for President in 2020[341]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State Officials
Notable Individuals
Organizations
Labor Unions
Publications

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely R November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Likely R November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Likely R November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely R November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Roger
Williams (R)
Julie
Oliver (D)
Undecided
EMC Research (D)[Y] September 2–5, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 43% 41%
Remington Research Group (R)[Z] September 1–2, 2020 810 (LV) ± 3.5% 52% 40% 8%
DCCC Targeting and Analytics (D)[G] July 21–22, 2020 389 (LV) ± 4.97% 45% 43%

Results

Texas's 25th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 220,088 55.9
Democratic Julie Oliver 165,697 42.1
Libertarian Bill Kelsey 7,738 2.0
Total votes 393,523 100.0
Republican hold

District 26

The 26th district is based in the northern portion of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, centering on Denton County. The incumbent is Republican Michael C. Burgess, who was re-elected with 59.4% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Michael Armstrong, pastor[3]
  • Jason Mrochek, U.S. Army veteran and founder of the Patriot Coalition[347]
  • Jack Wyman, activist[348]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 51,312 73.6
Republican Jack Wyman 7,816 11.2
Republican Michael Armstrong 5,745 8.2
Republican Jason Mrochek 4,846 7.0
Total votes 69,719 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Carol Iannuzzi, activist[349]
Eliminated in primary
  • Neil Durrance, former Denton city councilman and nominee for Texas's 26th congressional district in 2010[350]
  • Mat Pruneda, financial analyst, former candidate for Texas House District 64 in 2018[349]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Carol Iannuzzi 31,019 55.3
Democratic Mat Pruneda 15,701 28.0
Democratic Neil Durrance 9,329 16.7
Total votes 56,049 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 26th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 261,963 60.6
Democratic Carol Iannuzzi 161,009 37.3
Libertarian Mark Boler 9,243 2.1
Total votes 432,215 100.0
Republican hold

District 27

The 27th district stretches across the Coastal Bend, from Corpus Christi up to Bay City. The incumbent is Republican Michael Cloud, who was re-elected with 60.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Cloud (incumbent) 60,945 100.0
Total votes 60,945 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Ricardo "Rick" De La Fuente, businessman[351]
Eliminated in primary
  • Charlie Jackson, businessman[351]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 27th congressional district Democratic primary results by county  De La Fuente   De La Fuente—70–80%   De La Fuente—60–70%   De La Fuente—50–60%    Jackson   Jackson—50–60%
2020 Texas's 27th congressional district Democratic primary results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ricardo "Rick" De La Fuente 20,767 61.5
Democratic Charlie Jackson 13,030 38.5
Total votes 33,797 100.0

Libertarian primary

Candidates

Declared

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 27th congressional district election, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Cloud (incumbent) 172,305 63.1
Democratic Ricardo "Rick" De La Fuente 95,446 34.9
Libertarian Phil Gray 5,482 2.0
Total votes 273,253 100.0
Republican hold

District 28

The 28th district is based in the Laredo area and stretches north of the Rio Grande Valley into east San Antonio. The incumbent is Democrat Henry Cuellar, who was re-elected with 84.4% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Jessica Cisneros, attorney[352]

Endorsements

Jessica Cisneros
Federal politicians
Notable individuals
Labor unions
Organizations
Henry Cuellar
Federal politicians
Labor unions
Organizations

Primary results

2020 Texas's 28th congressional district Democratic primary results by county  Cuellar   Cuellar—70–80%   Cuellar—60–70%   Cuellar—50–60%    Tie   Cuellar/Cisneros tie—50–60%    Cisneros   Cisneros—50–60%   Cisneros—60–70%
2020 Texas's 28th congressional district Democratic primary results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 38,834 51.8
Democratic Jessica Cisneros 36,144 48.2
Total votes 74,978 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Sandra Whitten, Sunday school teacher[390]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sandra Whitten 20,656 100.0
Total votes 20,656 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 28th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 137,494 58.3
Republican Sandra Whitten 91,925 39.0
Libertarian Bekah Congdon 6,425 2.7
Total votes 235,844 100.0
Democratic hold

District 29

The 29th district encompasses parts of eastern Houston, taking in the heavily Latino areas of the city. The incumbent is Democrat Sylvia Garcia, who was elected with 75.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sylvia Garcia (incumbent) 28,180 100.0
Total votes 28,180 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Jaimy Z. Blanco, real estate investor and candidate for Texas's 29th congressional district in 2018[3]
Eliminated in primary
  • Robert Schafranek, sales associate and candidate for Texas's 29th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaimy Z. Blanco 4,336 56.9
Republican Robert Schafranek 3,286 43.1
Total votes 7,622 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 29th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sylvia Garcia (incumbent) 111,305 71.1
Republican Jaimy Z. Blanco 42,840 27.4
Libertarian Phil Kurtz 2,328 1.5
Total votes 156,473 100.0
Democratic hold

District 30

The 30th district encompasses Downtown Dallas as well as South Dallas. The incumbent is Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, who was re-elected with 91.1% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 58,804 70.6
Democratic Shenita Cleveland 11,358 13.6
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 10,452 12.6
Democratic Hasani Burton 2,638 3.2
Total votes 83,252 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tre Pennie 9,928 100.0
Total votes 9,645 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 30th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 204,928 77.5
Republican Tre Pennie 48,685 18.4
Independent Eric Williams 10,851 4.1
Total votes 264,464 100.0
Democratic hold

District 31

The 31st district encompasses northern Austin to Temple, including Williamson and Bell counties. The incumbent is Republican John Carter, who was re-elected with 50.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Abhiram Garapati, real estate investor[393]
  • Christopher Wall, police officer[73]
  • Mike Williams, retired firefighter[393]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 53,070 82.3
Republican Mike Williams 5,560 8.6
Republican Christopher Wall 3,155 4.9
Republican Abhiram Garapati 2,717 4.2
Total votes 64,502 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Donna Imam, computer engineer[393]
Eliminated in runoff
Eliminated in primary
Endorsements
Donna Imam[394]
State officials

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Christine Eady Mann 24,145 34.7
Democratic Donna Imam 21,352 30.7
Democratic Tammy Young 9,956 14.3
Democratic Michael Edward Grimes 7,542 10.8
Democratic Eric Hanke 4,117 5.9
Democratic Dan Janjigian 2,471 3.5
Total votes 69,583 100.0

Runoff results

Democratic primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donna Imam 21,026 56.6
Democratic Christine Eady Mann 16,109 43.4
Total votes 37,135 100.0

Third parties

Candidates

Declared
  • Clark Patterson (Libertarian), photographer and videographer and candidate for Texas's 35th congressional district in 2018
Declined
  • Trip Seibold (Libertarian), former software engineer (running for Texas State Board of Education district 10)[397]

General election

Endorsements

John Carter (R)
Organizations
Donna Imam (D)
Cabinet-level Officials
Federal Officials
State Officials
Organizations
Labor Unions
Individuals
Newspapers and Publications

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Lean R November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely R November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely R November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Likely R November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely R November 2, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
John
Carter (R)
Donna
Imam (D)
Clark
Patterson (L)
Jeremy
Bravo (I)
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) August 26–27, 2020 831 (V) 43% 37% 7% 3% 11%
Hypothetical polling
with Generic Democrat and Generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D)[L] Sep 19–21, 2019 523 (LV) – 656 (LV) ± 3.8% – ± 4.2% 51% 44%

Results

Texas's 31st congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 212,695 53.4
Democratic Donna Imam 176,293 44.3
Libertarian Clark Patterson 8,922 2.2
Independent Johnathan Scott (write-in) 147 0.1
Total votes 398,057 100.0
Republican hold

District 32

The 32nd district covers northern and eastern Dallas and its inner northern suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Colin Allred, who flipped the district and was elected with 52.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Colin Allred (incumbent) 72,761 100.0
Total votes 72,761 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Genevieve Collins, business executive[408]
Eliminated in primary
Declined
Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Genevieve
Collins
Floyd
McLendon
Other Undecided
Optimus/Big Tree PAC January 28–30, 2020 971 (LV) ± 3.3% 14%[m] 10% 4%[n] 72%

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Genevieve Collins 22,908 52.9
Republican Floyd McLendon 14,699 33.9
Republican Jon Hollis 1,945 4.5
Republican Jeff Tokar 1,846 4.4
Republican Mark Sackett 1,892 4.4
Total votes 43,324 100.0

Libertarian primary

Candidates

Declared

  • Christy Mowrey, executive director of education[412]

Endorsements

Colin Allred (D)
U.S. Presidents
Organizations
Genevieve Collins (R)
Organizations

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely D November 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Likely D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D November 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Likely D November 2, 2020
Politico[11] Lean D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Likely D November 2, 2020
RCP[13] Lean D November 2, 2020
270toWin[14] Likely D November 2, 2020

Results

Texas's 32nd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Colin Allred (incumbent) 178,542 52.0
Republican Genevieve Collins 157,867 45.9
Libertarian Christy Mowrey Peterson 4,946 1.4
Independent Jason Sigmon 2,332 0.7
Total votes 343,687 100.0
Democratic hold

District 33

The 33rd district is located in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, encompassing Downtown Fort Worth, western Dallas, and parts of Grand Prairie and Irving. The incumbent is Democrat Marc Veasey, who was re-elected with 76.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Sean Paul Segura, activist[3]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 23,869 63.6
Democratic Sean Paul Segura 13,678 36.4
Total votes 37,547 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Fabian Vasquez, business manager[3]

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Fabian Vasquez 7,317 100.0
Total votes 7,317 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 33rd congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 105,317 66.8
Republican Fabian Vasquez 39,638 25.2
Independent Carlos Quintanilla 8,071 5.1
Libertarian Jason Reeves 2,586 1.6
Independent Rene Welton 1,994 1.3
Total votes 157,606 100.0
Democratic hold

District 34

The 34th district stretches from Brownsville in the Rio Grande Valley, northward into rural counties. The incumbent is Democrat Filemon Vela, who was elected with 60.0% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Osbert Rodriguez Haro III, health consultant[421]
  • Diego Zavala, high school teacher[421]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon Vela (incumbent) 39,484 75.1
Democratic Diego Zavala 9,707 18.4
Democratic Osbert Rodriguez Haro III 3,413 6.5
Total votes 52,604 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Rey Gonzalez, physician and nominee for Texas's 34th congressional district in 2016 and 2018[421]
Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rey Gonzalez 10,665 56.3
Republican Rod Lingsch 8,271 43.7
Total votes 18,936 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 34th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon Vela (incumbent) 111,439 55.4
Republican Rey Gonzalez 84,119 41.9
Libertarian Anthony Cristo 3,222 1.6
Independent Chris Royal 2,235 1.1
Total votes 201,027 100.0
Democratic hold

District 35

The 35th district connects eastern San Antonio to southeastern Austin, through the I-35 corridor. The incumbent is Democrat Lloyd Doggett, who was re-elected with 71.3% in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Rafael Alcoser, insurance broker[3]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 35th congressional district Democratic primary results by county  Doggett   Doggett—80–90%   Doggett—70–80%   Doggett—60–70%
2020 Texas's 35th congressional district Democratic primary results by county
Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 51,169 73.0
Democratic Rafael Alcoser 18,922 27.0
Total votes 70,091 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Jennifer Garcia Sharon, volunteer caregiver[3]
Eliminated in runoff
  • William Hayward, ostrich farmer[3]
Eliminated in primary
  • Nick Moutos, attorney[422]

Primary results

2020 Texas's 35th congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county  Sharon   Sharon—40–50%   Sharon—30–40%    Hayward   Hayward—40–50%    Moutos   Moutos—30–40%
2020 Texas's 35th congressional district Republican primary initial round results by county
Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jennifer Garcia Sharon 6,751 37.1
Republican William Hayward 6,237 34.3
Republican Nick Moutos 5,200 28.6
Total votes 18,188 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary runoff results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jennifer Garcia Sharon 4,138 53.2
Republican William Hayward 3,645 46.8
Total votes 7,783 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid D October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe D June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 35th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 176,373 65.4
Republican Jennifer Garcia Sharon 80,795 30.0
Libertarian Mark Loewe 7,393 2.7
Independent Jason Mata 5,236 1.9
Total votes 269,797 100.0
Democratic hold

District 36

The 36th district encompasses parts of Southeast Texas, including the Clear Lake region. The incumbent is Republican Brian Babin, who was re-elected with 72.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Endorsements
RJ Boatman (R)
Political Organizations

Primary results

Republican primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin (incumbent) 75,277 89.6
Republican RJ Boatman 8,774 10.4
Total votes 84,051 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Rashad Lewis, former Jasper city councilman[3]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rashad Lewis 22,422 100.0
Total votes 22,422 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe R July 2, 2020
FiveThirtyEight[8] Solid R October 13, 2020
Inside Elections[9] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[10] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[11] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[12] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[13] Safe R June 9, 2020
270toWin[14] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Texas's 36th congressional district, 2020[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin (incumbent) 222,712 73.6
Democratic Rashad Lewis 73,148 24.3
Libertarian Chad Abbey 4,848 1.6
Green Hal Ridley Jr. 1,571 0.5
Total votes 302,549 100.0

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ Includes "Refused"
  3. ^ "Blank ballot/refused" with 9%
  4. ^ "Someone new" with 41%
  5. ^ a b c d e f Not yet released
  6. ^ Not yet released
  7. ^ Not yet released
  8. ^ "Someone else" with 2%
  9. ^ Standard VI response
  10. ^ Response after pollster gives respondents Valenzuela's biography
  11. ^ "Other" with 2% and Undecided with 8%
  12. ^ "Other/neither" with 4%
  13. ^ Including voters who lean towards a particular candidate
  14. ^ Tokar with 2%; Sackett with 1%; Hollis with 1%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll sponsored by the DCCC, which has endorsed Seikaly prior to the sampling period.
  2. ^ Poll sponsored by Lulu Seikaly's campaign and DCCC.
  3. ^ Poll sponsored by Van Taylor's campaign
  4. ^ Poll sponsored by Lulu Seikaly's campaign
  5. ^ Poll sponsored by Lulu Seikaly's campaign
  6. ^ a b Poll sponsored by Daniel's campaign
  7. ^ a b c d Poll conducted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.
  8. ^ Poll sponsored by Wesley Hunt's campaign.
  9. ^ Poll sponsored by Wesley Hunt's campaign
  10. ^ a b c d Poll commissioned by the Congressional Leadership Fund
  11. ^ a b Poll sponsored by Siegel's campaign.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Poll sponsored by House Majority Forward, a non-profit arm of the Democratic-supporting House Majority PAC.
  13. ^ The Miles of Greatness Fund supports Jackson's candidacy
  14. ^ a b The Club for Growth had endorsed Ronny Jackson prior to the sampling period of this poll
  15. ^ Poll sponsored by Kennedy's campaign
  16. ^ Poll sponsored by the Club for Growth, which has endorsed Roy prior to the sampling period.
  17. ^ Poll sponsored by Davis' campaign
  18. ^ Poll conducted for End Citizens United, which has endorsed Davis prior to this poll's sampling period.
  19. ^ Poll sponsored by Wendy Davis's campaign
  20. ^ Poll sponsored by Troy Nehls' campaign
  21. ^ a b Poll conducted for the Gonzales campaign.
  22. ^ Poll conducted for the Gonzales campaign.
  23. ^ a b Bold PAC is a campaigning arm of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, which had endorsed Valenzuela prior to this poll's sampling period
  24. ^ a b Poll conduced for the House Majority Pac.
  25. ^ Poll conducted for Oliver's campaign.
  26. ^ Poll sponsored by Williams' campaign

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  2. ^ "Republican Primary Candidates". Republican Party of Texas. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn "Candidate Information". candidate.texas-election.com. Retrieved January 12, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci "::Texas Election Night Results::". results.texas-election.com. Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved March 3, 2020.
  5. ^ Mansfield, Erin (September 5, 2019). "'Conservative Democrat' announces run against Congressman Louie Gohmert". Tyler Morning Telegraph. Retrieved September 14, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Sills, Ed (January 26, 2020). "Texas AFL-CIO COPE 2020 Endorsements". Texas AFL-CIO.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 House Race Ratings". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 House Forecast". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved October 13, 2020.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 House Ratings". House Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 House race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "House 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "Battle for the House 2020". RCP. September 15, 2020.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2020 House Election Interactive Map". 270toWin. July 26, 2020.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai "Texas Election Results - Official Results". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved November 26, 2020.
  16. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (August 9, 2019). "Houston's Dan Crenshaw is top fundraiser in Texas among U.S. House candidates". Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  17. ^ Scherer, Jasper (December 10, 2019). "Former O'Rourke adviser announces for Congress, picks up his endorsement". The Houston Chronicle. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
  18. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (February 8, 2019). "Navy veteran challenges fellow Navy veteran Rep. Dan Crenshaw in Houston Congressional District". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  19. ^ Scherer, Jasper (March 9, 2020). "Elisa Cardnell suspends campaign less than a week after forcing runoff". HoustonChronicle.com.