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2008 San Francisco Board of Supervisors election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 2008 San Francisco Board of Supervisors elections occurred on November 4, 2008. Seven of the eleven seats of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors were contested in this election. Four incumbents were termed out of office, while three ran for reelection.

Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan, though most candidates in San Francisco do receive funding and support from various political parties. The election was held using ranked-choice voting.

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  • ✪ 2014 Alumni Hall of Fame Inductee: Tom Ammiano

Transcription

Now it is my honor to present the inaugural alumni service award to an alum who have served San Francisco and the State of California with unflagging energy and the commitment for four decades. Come on Congressman Miller, the Honorable Tom Ammiano. [ Cheering & Applause ] Hey, wait a minute. I got 10 minutes here to do. [ Cheering & Applause ] Let me praise you here, Tom. Hang on a second. All right. The Honorable Tom Ammiano has served San Francisco as a teacher, a civil rights leader, educator, supervisor, assembly member, fashion plate. [ Laughter ] >> Look at you. >> Look at you. >> Giants colors. >> Man, it's like Project Broadway Runway here. In 1975, Tom became the first public school teacher in the San Francisco to make a sexual orientation public. I'll have-- [ Cheering & Applause ] >> [Shouting] We love you. [ Cheering & Applause ] >> Two years later he co-founded a movement and worked closely with Supervisor Harvey Milk to successfully defeat the Briggs Initiative started by Senator John Briggs to ban gay people from teaching in California. Tom was elected to the San Francisco School Board in 1990 and to the Board of Supervisors in 1994 and served as president on both. Two-time mayoral candidate, he remains on the board until his election in 2008 as assembly member representing the 17th district. Throughout this time, Tom has been a leader on LGBT rights, healthcare, homelessness issues and the rights of students, workers, women and immigrants. [ Cheering & Applause ] A strong advocate over the years for San Francisco State and public higher education, he was inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame in 2006. "Don't make it about yourself. Make it about what you believe in," Tom has said describing his approach to politics and he has advised to those entering yet. Tom has consistently been committed to advancing social justice among the highest ideals of this university. For his tireless work during a long and distinguished career in public service, for his commitment to giving a voice to disenfranchised and powerless, and for his authenticity and courage to stand where his convictions, it is my pleasure to present Tom Ammiano, MA in Special Education, the first Alumni Service Award recipient. Hey. [ Cheering & Applause ] >> I love Ben, you know, for all his advocacy for radio. In fact, he told me one time I had a great face for radio, so thank you Ben. Well, it is quite an honor, you know. I attended San Francisco State as a refugee from New Jersey. So, you can imagine the--it was--you can imagine it did seem like another planet when I first started as a graduate student in Special Education and every time I went to class, those black birds kept attacking my head and I'm not going to say I think state in those days, in '63 or '64, it had a sedate veneer but if you scratch the veneer you could see what the future was going to bring. And it was going to bring a lot more, a diversity, ethnic diversity, class diversity and of course, those years that Representative Miller was talking about, you know. I was served in Vietnam in a Quaker program during the war and the reason I knew about that program was because one night, you know, like about 8 o'clock at night with that terrible fluorescent lighting they used to have in the education building, it wasn't very flattering for a girl, you know what I'm saying. Putting out the Gator, hoping perhaps to have an encounter with someone. I saw a little bulletin and it said international voluntary services working in Vietnam and in Laos, looking for people, looking for teachers, looking for community organizers. And because of that entree, as functional as it was in a hallway in the education building with bad lighting, and that really, that really did change my life. And I did go to Vietnam and I did teach school there for two years when all the bad and the good stuff was happening and it was quite an epiphany for me and I will teach kids, maybe 60, 65 kids, English as a second language. And of course, you know, they all learned it with a New Jersey accent. So--This is a dog. This is dog. [ Laughter ] But it was also a political awakening for me as well. And you know, when I came back to San Francisco and got involved in community politics. You know, San Francisco State was always there. San Francisco State was kind of an anchor, you know, and it's been a barometer for changing demographics and changing sense of values. And I respect it. I respect it for that very, very, very much. My daughter went to San Francisco State and got her teaching credential. My son-in-law is now a vice principal here in San Francisco because of his education here. So, there's always a lot like to criticize because, you know, that's us. We like dysfunction, yeah. We hate to admit to that. And through that dysfunction comes progress. And that's when terrifically gratifying to me. So, tonight compensates for the loss of the Giants. But you know, tomorrow, there's redemption. Not only are we going to win the game, but on the kiss-cam, I will be with Buster Posey. Think of that. So thank you very much. [ Cheering & Applause ]

Contents

Results

District 1

This district consists of the Richmond District. Incumbent supervisor Jake McGoldrick was termed out of office.

District 1 supervisorial election, 2008[1][2]
Candidate Votes %
Eric Mar 11,625 40.52
Sue Lee 9,733 33.93
Alicia Wang 4,206 14.66
Brian Larkin 995 3.47
Jason Jungreis 610 2.13
Nicholas Belloni 536 1.87
Fidel Gakuba 361 1.26
George Flamik 324 1.13
Sherman D'Silva 254 0.89
Write-in 42 0.15
Valid votes 29,643 90.79%
Invalid or blank votes 3,008 9.21%
Total votes 32,651 100.00
Voter turnout 80.76%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 1
Eric Mar 11,649 40.51
Sue Lee 9,753 33.92
Alicia Wang (eliminated) 4,218 14.67
Brian Larkin (eliminated) 998 3.47
Jason Jungreis (eliminated) 614 2.14
Nicholas Belloni (eliminated) 537 1.87
Fidel Gakuba (eliminated) 363 1.26
George Flamik (eliminated) 325 1.13
Sherman D'Silva (eliminated) 257 0.89
Write-in (eliminated) 42 0.15
Eligible votes 28,756 90.73%
Exhausted votes 2,938 9.27%
Total votes 31,694 100.00
Ranked choice voting — Pass 2
Eric Mar 13,152 50.67
Sue Lee 12,805 49.33
Eligible votes 25,957 81,90%
Exhausted votes 5,737 18.10%
Total votes 31,694 100.00

District 3

District 3 consists of the northeastern corner of San Francisco, including Chinatown, the Financial District, Fisherman's Wharf, Nob Hill, North Beach, and Telegraph Hill. Incumbent supervisor Aaron Peskin was termed out of office.

District 3 supervisorial election, 2008[1][3]
Candidate Votes %
David Chiu 10,209 37.72
Joseph Alioto, Jr. 6,268 23.16
Denise McCarthy 3,165 11.69
Claudine Cheng 2,492 9.21
Mike DeNunzio 1,330 4.91
Lynn Jefferson 1,234 4.56
Tony Gantner 1,191 4.40
Wilma Pang 939 3.47
Mark Quessey 204 0.75
Write-in 35 0.13
Valid votes 28,276 90.33%
Invalid or blank votes 3,028 9.67%
Total votes 31,304 100.00
Voter turnout 80.44%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 7
David Chiu 13,582 59.37
Joseph Alioto, Jr. 9,293 40.63
Eligible votes 22,875 76.03%
Exhausted votes 7,211 23.97%
Total votes 30,086 100.00

Ranked-choice vote distribution

Candidate Pass 1 Pass 2 Pass 3 Pass 4 Pass 5 Pass 6 Pass 7
David Chiu 10,270 10,512 10,800 10,919 11,146 12,348 13,582
Joseph Alioto, Jr. 6,285 6,400 6,655 7,113 7,423 8,175 9,293
Denise McCarthy 3,172 3,341 3,572 3,715 4,227 4,633
Claudine Cheng 2,515 2,779 2,886 3,027 3,223
Lynn Jefferson 1,235 1,365 1,471 1,650
Mike DeNunzio 1,335 1,386 1,466
Tony Gantner 1,195 1,235
Wilma Pang 952
Mark Quessey 204
Write-in 35
Eligible ballots 27,198 27,018 26,850 26,424 26,019 25,156 22,875
Exhausted ballots 2,888 3,068 3,236 3,662 4,067 4,930 7,211
Total 30,086 30,086 30,086 30,086 30,086 30,086 30,086

District 4

District 4 consists primarily of the Sunset district. Incumbent supervisor Carmen Chu was seeking her first election after being appointed by Mayor Gavin Newsom in the wake of Ed Jew's suspension and resignation.

District 4 supervisorial special election, 2008[1][4]
Candidate Votes %
Carmen Chu (incumbent) 15,353 52.37
Ron Dudum 10,304 35.15
David Ferguson 3,606 12.30
Write-in 53 0.18
Valid votes 30,060 92.86%
Invalid or blank votes 2,312 7.14%
Total votes 32,372 100.00
Voter turnout 79.14%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 1
Carmen Chu (incumbent) 15,405 52.33
Ron Dudum 10,346 35.14
David Ferguson 3,635 12.35
Write-in 53 0.18
Eligible votes 29,439 93.08%
Exhausted votes 2,189 6.92%
Total votes 31,628 100.00

District 5

District 5 consists of the Fillmore, Haight-Ashbury, Hayes Valley, Japantown, UCSF, and the Western Addition. Incumbent supervisor Ross Mirkarimi was seeking reelection.

District 5 supervisorial election, 2008[1]
Candidate Votes %
Ross Mirkarimi (incumbent) 27,482 77.39
Owen P. O'Connell 5,962 16.79
Rob Anderson 1,982 5.58
Write-in 87 0.24
Valid votes 37,408 86.85%
Invalid or blank votes 5,662 13.15%
Total votes 43,070 100.00
Voter turnout 83.33%

District 7

District 7 consists of City College, Forest Hill, Lake Merced, Mount Davidson, Parkmerced, San Francisco State University, St. Francis Wood, and Twin Peaks. Incumbent supervisor Sean Elsbernd was seeking reelection.

District 7 supervisorial election, 2008[1]
Candidate Votes %
Sean Elsbernd (incumbent) 22,019 71.06
Julian Lagos 5,792 18.69
Billy Bob Whitmer 2,964 9.57
Write-in 211 0.68
Valid votes 32,420 85.09%
Invalid or blank votes 5,683 14.91%
Total votes 38,103 100.00
Voter turnout 84.04%

District 9

District 9 consists of Bernal Heights, the Inner Mission, and part of the Portola. Incumbent supervisor Tom Ammiano was termed out of office.

District 9 supervisorial election, 2008[1][5]
Candidate Votes %
David Campos 9,440 35.78
Mark Sanchez 7,616 28.86
Eric Quezada 5,337 20.23
Eva Royale 1,830 6.94
Thomas Valtin 857 3.25
Eric Storey 802 3.04
Vern Mathews 466 1.77
Write-in 39 0.15
Valid votes 27,183 91.59%
Invalid or blank votes 2,497 8.41%
Total votes 29,680 100.00
Voter turnout 81.46%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 3
David Campos 12,637 53.83
Mark Sanchez 10,837 46.17
Eligible votes 23,474 81.27%
Exhausted votes 5,410 18.73%
Total votes 28,884 100.00

Ranked-choice vote distribution

Candidate Pass 1 Pass 2 Pass 3
David Campos 9,468 10,387 12,637
Mark Sanchez 7,648 8,623 10,837
Eric Quezada 5,352 5,964
Eva Royale 1,842
Thomas Valtin 862
Eric Storey 806
Vern Mathews 469
Write-in 39
Eligible ballots 26,486 24,974 23,474
Exhausted ballots 2,398 3,910 5,410
Total 28,884 28,884 28,884

District 11

District 11 consists of the Excelsior, Ingleside, Oceanview, and the Outer Mission. Incumbent supervisor Gerardo Sandoval was termed out of office.

District 11 supervisorial election, 2008[1][6]
Candidate Votes %
John Avalos 6,918 28.19
Ahsha Safaì 5,941 24.21
Myrna Lim 4,442 18.10
Julio Ramos 3,626 14.78
Randall Knox 2,324 9.47
Mary Goodnature 455 1.85
Adrian Bermudez 410 1.67
Eli Horn 391 1.59
Write-in 24 0.10
A. Jackson Matteson 6 0.02
Valid votes 25,126 91.37%
Invalid or blank votes 2,372 8.63%
Total votes 27,498 100.00
Voter turnout 76.21%
Ranked choice voting — Pass 4
John Avalos 10,225 52.93
Ahsha Safaì 9,092 47.07
Eligible votes 19,317 71.79%
Exhausted votes 7,592 28.21%
Total votes 26,909 100.00

Ranked-choice vote distribution

Candidate Pass 1 Pass 2 Pass 3 Pass 4
John Avalos 6,964 7,625 8,887 10,225
Ahsha Safaì 5,941 5,965 6,727 7,611
Myrna Lim 4,462 5,053 5,929
Julio Ramos 3,646 4,321
Randall Knox 2,337
Mary Goodnature 459
Adrian Bermudez 415
Eli Horn 394
Write-in 30
A. Jackson Matteson 1
Eligible ballots 24,673 23,726 22,427 19,317
Exhausted ballots 2,236 3,183 4,482 7,592
Total 26,909 26,909 26,909 26,909

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "November 4, 2008 General Election Statement of Vote" (PDF). San Francisco Department of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  2. ^ "District 1 – Ranked-choice voting". San Francisco Department of Elections. December 2, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  3. ^ "District 3 – Ranked-choice voting". San Francisco Department of Elections. December 2, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  4. ^ "District 4 – Ranked-choice voting". San Francisco Department of Elections. December 2, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  5. ^ "District 9 – Ranked-choice voting". San Francisco Department of Elections. December 2, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  6. ^ "District 11 – Ranked-choice voting". San Francisco Department of Elections. December 2, 2008. Archived from the original on April 8, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.

External links

This page was last edited on 29 September 2019, at 17:14
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