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2020 United States gubernatorial elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States gubernatorial elections

← 2019 November 3, 2020 2021 →

13 governorships
11 states; 2 territories
  Majority party Minority party
 
Greg Abbott 2015.jpg
Phil Murphy for Governor (cropped 2).jpg
Leader Greg Abbott Phil Murphy
Party Republican Democratic
Leader's seat Texas New Jersey
Seats before 26 24
Seats after 27 23
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 10,698,657 9,001,081
Percentage 52.41% 44.09%
Seats up 7 4
Seats won 8 3

2020 Delaware gubernatorial election2020 Indiana gubernatorial election2020 Missouri gubernatorial election2020 Montana gubernatorial election2020 New Hampshire gubernatorial election2020 North Carolina gubernatorial election2020 North Dakota gubernatorial election2020 Utah gubernatorial election2020 Vermont gubernatorial election2020 Washington gubernatorial election2020 West Virginia gubernatorial election2020 Puerto Rico gubernatorial election2020 American Samoa gubernatorial election2020 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
About this image
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Republican gain
     New Progressive hold      Nonpartisan

The 2020 United States gubernatorial elections were held on November 3, 2020, in 11 states and two territories. The previous gubernatorial elections for this group of states took place in 2016, except in New Hampshire and Vermont where governors only serve two-year terms and elected their current governors in 2018. Nine state governors ran for reelection and all nine won,[a] while Democrat Steve Bullock of Montana could not run again due to term limits and Republican Gary Herbert of Utah decided to retire at the end of his term.[1]

In addition to state gubernatorial elections, the territories of American Samoa and Puerto Rico also held elections for their governors. Puerto Rican governor Wanda Vázquez Garced lost the New Progressive primary to Pedro Pierluisi,[2] while Lolo Matalasi Moliga of American Samoa could not run again due to term limits.[3]

The elections took place concurrently with the 2020 presidential election, elections to the House of Representatives and Senate, and numerous state and local elections. This round of gubernatorial elections marked the first time since West Virginia Governor Jim Justice's party switch in mid-2017 that Republicans flipped any governorships held previously by Democrats, and the first round of gubernatorial elections since 2016 where Republicans made net gains, ending a streak of Democratic net gains that had occurred in prior elections during the presidency of Republican Donald Trump.

Election predictions

Several sites and individuals published predictions of competitive seats. These predictions looked at factors such as the strength of the incumbent (if the incumbent is running for re-election), the strength of the candidates, and the partisan leanings of the state (reflected in part by the state's Cook Partisan Voting Index rating). The predictions assigned ratings to each seat, with the rating indicating the predicted advantage that a party has in winning that seat.

Most election predictors use:

  • "tossup": no advantage
  • "tilt" (used by some predictors): advantage that is not quite as strong as "lean"
  • "lean": slight advantage
  • "likely": significant, but surmountable, advantage
  • "safe": near-certain chance of victory
State PVI[4] Incumbent[5] Last
race
Cook
October 23,
2020
[6]
IE
October 28,
2020
[7]
Sabato
November 2,
2020
[8]
Politico
November 2,
2020
[9]
Daily Kos
October 28,
2020
[10]
RCP
July 29,
2020
[11]
270towin
October 23,
2020
[12]
Result
Delaware D+6 John Carney 58.3% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Carney
(59.5%)
Indiana R+9 Eric Holcomb 51.4% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R Holcomb
(56.5%)
Missouri R+9 Mike Parson 51.1% R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Parson
(57.2%)
Montana R+11 Steve Bullock
(term-limited)
50.2% D Tossup Tossup Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Tossup Tossup Gianforte
(54.1%) (flip)
New Hampshire EVEN Chris Sununu 52.8% R Safe R Likely R Likely R Likely R Safe R Likely R Likely R Sununu
(65.1%)
North Carolina R+3 Roy Cooper 49.0% D Likely D Lean D Likely D Lean D Likely D Lean D Likely D Cooper
(51.5%)
North Dakota R+16 Doug Burgum 76.5% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Burgum
(65.8%)
Utah R+20 Gary Herbert
(retiring)
66.7% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Cox
(64.3%)
Vermont D+15 Phil Scott 55.2% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Likely R Safe R Scott
(68.5%)
Washington D+7 Jay Inslee 54.2% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Inslee
(56.6%)
West Virginia R+19 Jim Justice 49.1% D[b] Safe R Safe R Likely R Likely R Safe R Safe R Likely R Justice
(64.9%)

Montana was considered the most competitive race in this cycle and was rated a tossup by four of six major pundits. Incumbent Democratic governor Steve Bullock was term-limited, but his lieutenant governor, Mike Cooney, a longtime political figure in the state since 1977, was the Democratic nominee. The Republican nominee was Montana at-large congressman Greg Gianforte, who is a controversial figure because he was arrested for body-slamming a reporter the day of a 2017 special election. Gianforte also isn't from Montana.[14] The Bullock administration had an approval rating of 52% and a disapproval of 31%, according to a poll by the Morning Consult, meaning Cooney's election chances were higher in the otherwise solidly Republican state.[15] North Carolina was the next most competitive race, as it is a Republican-leaning swing state with a Democratic governor, Roy Cooper, meaning that Cooper faced a tough reelection. Cooper won his 2016 election by a mere 10,277 votes, or 0.22%.[16] However, most forecasters gave the race a Democratic lean as Cooper had an approval rating of 59%.[17] Cooper had also lead most polls against his Republican challenger, Dan Forest, by an average of a 11-point lead, according to RealClearPolitics.[18]

Vermont and New Hampshire are both races that could have become competitive as they are Democratic states with Republican governors in a presidential year. However, Republican incumbents Phil Scott of Vermont and Chris Sununu of New Hampshire are ranked among the most popular governors in the United States, and both races were rated likely to be safe Republican. Both are viewed as centrists who attract Democratic and independent voters. Scott's challenger was David Zuckerman, the state's lieutenant governor, who ran on both the Democratic and Progressive nominations. Zuckerman had been endorsed by Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders. Sununu was running against New Hampshire Senate Majority Leader Dan Feltes.

In Missouri, Republican incumbent Mike Parson assumed office after the resignation of Eric Greitens due to sexual harassment and violations of campaign finance laws,[19] and his lack of name recognition and unpopularity could have made his race against state auditor Nicole Galloway, Missouri's only Democratic statewide office holder, competitive, though most forecasters still rated the race as lean Republican due to Missouri's heavy Republican lean. West Virginia’s gubernatorial race was seen as safe for Republicans because the state heavily leans Republican, but some forecasts rated it as likely Republican due to corruption allegations against incumbent Jim Justice[20][21][22] that have led to rising unpopularity. Justice faced centrist Democrat Ben Salango, who was endorsed by U.S. Senator Joe Manchin and multiple local unions.[23]

The gubernatorial races for John Carney in Delaware and Jay Inslee in Washington were seen as safe for Democrats, while the races for Eric Holcomb in Indiana, Doug Burgum in North Dakota, and Spencer Cox in Utah were seen as safe for Republicans.

Statistics

Closest races

States where the margin of victory was between 1% and 5%:

  1. Puerto Rico, 1.37%
  2. North Carolina, 4.51%

Red denotes races won by Republicans. Blue denotes races won by Democrats. Dark blue denotes race won by New Progressives.

Partisan control of states

All of the states that held gubernatorial elections in 2020 also held state legislative elections in 2020, although some legislative seats were not up for election in states that stagger legislative elections.

Before election After election
State Governor Senate House Governor Senate House
Delaware Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
Indiana Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Missouri Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Montana Dem Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
New Hampshire Rep Dem Dem Rep Rep Rep
North Carolina Dem Rep Rep Dem Rep Rep
North Dakota Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Utah Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep
Vermont Rep Dem Dem Rep Dem Dem
Washington Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem Dem
West Virginia Rep[c] Rep Rep Rep Rep Rep

Summary

States

State Incumbent Results
State Governor Party First
elected
Status Candidates
Delaware John Carney Democratic 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY John Carney (D) 59.5%
Julianne Murray (R) 38.6%
Kathy DeMatteis (I) 1.2%
John Machurek (L) 0.7%
Indiana Eric Holcomb Republican 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Eric Holcomb (R) 56.5%
Woody Myers (D) 32.1%
Donald Rainwater (L) 11.4%
Missouri Mike Parson Republican 2018[d] Incumbent elected to full term Green tickY Mike Parson (R) 57.2%
Nicole Galloway (D) 40.6%
Rik Combs (L) 1.6%
Jerome Bauer (G) 0.6%
Montana Steve Bullock Democratic 2012 Incumbent term limited
New governor elected
Republican gain
Green tickY Greg Gianforte (R) 54.1%
Mike Cooney (D) 42.1%
Lyman Bishop (L) 3.8%
New Hampshire Chris Sununu Republican 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Chris Sununu (R) 65.1%
Dan Feltes (D) 33.4%
Darryl Perry (L) 1.5%
North Carolina Roy Cooper Democratic 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Roy Cooper (D) 51.5%
Dan Forest (R) 47.0%
Steven DiFiore (L) 1.1%
Al Pisano (C) 0.5%
North Dakota Doug Burgum Republican 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Doug Burgum (R) 65.8%
Shelley Lenz (D) 25.4%
DuWayne Hendrickson (L) 3.9%
Utah Gary Herbert Republican 2009[e] Incumbent retired
New governor elected
Republican hold
Green tickY Spencer Cox (R) 64.3%
Christopher Peterson (D) 31.0%
Daniel Cottam (L) 3.1%
Gregory Duerden (I) 1.6%
Vermont Phil Scott Republican 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Phil Scott (R) 68.5%
David Zuckerman (D) 27.4%
Washington Jay Inslee Democratic 2012 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Jay Inslee (D) 56.6%
Loren Culp (R) 43.1%
West Virginia Jim Justice Republican 2016 Incumbent reelected Green tickY Jim Justice (R) 64.9%
Ben Salango (D) 30.8%
Erika Kolenich (L) 2.9%
Daniel Lutz (G) 1.5%

Territories

State Incumbent Party First elected Incumbent Status Candidates
American Samoa Lolo Letalu Matalasi Moliga Nonpartisan/Democratic[f] 2012 Incumbent term-limited
New governor elected
Nonpartisan/Democratic hold
Puerto Rico Wanda Vázquez Garced PNP/Republican[24] 2019[g] Incumbent defeated in primary
New governor elected[25]
New Progressive Party Hold
Democratic Gain[h]

Election dates

These were the election dates for the regularly scheduled general elections.

State Filing deadline[29] Primary election[29] Primary run-off (if necessary)[29] General election Poll closing (Eastern Time)[30]
Delaware July 14, 2020 September 15, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 8:00pm
Indiana February 7, 2020 June 2, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 6:00pm
Missouri March 31, 2020 August 4, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 8:00pm
Montana March 9, 2020 June 2, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 10:00pm
New Hampshire June 12, 2020 September 8, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 8:00pm
North Carolina December 20, 2019 March 3, 2020 June 23, 2020 November 3, 2020 7:30pm
North Dakota April 6, 2020 June 9, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 10:00pm
Utah March 19, 2020 June 30, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 10:00pm
Vermont May 28, 2020 August 11, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 7:00pm
Washington May 15, 2020 August 4, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 11:00pm
West Virginia January 25, 2020 June 9, 2020 N/A November 3, 2020 7:30pm
American Samoa September 1, 2020 N/A N/A November 3, 2020 3:00am
Puerto Rico January 5, 2020 August 16, 2020[i] N/A November 3, 2020 4:00pm

Delaware

2020 Delaware gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
John C. Carney Jr. official portrait 112th Congress (cropped).jpg
3x4.svg
Nominee John Carney Julianne Murray
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 292,903 190,312
Percentage 59.5% 38.6%

Delaware state election results.svg
County results
Carney:      50–60%      60–70%
Murray:      50–60%

Governor before election

John Carney
Democratic

Elected Governor

John Carney
Democratic

One-term incumbent Democrat John Carney ran for re-election to a second term.[32][33] Primaries took place on September 15. Carney decisively defeated progressive community activist and environmentalist[34] David Lamar Williams, Jr. in the Democratic primary.[35] Multiple candidates ran in the Republican primary, including attorney Julianne Murray, Delaware State Senator from the 16th district Colin Bonini, small business owner David Bosco, local Republican politician David Graham, Delaware State Senator from the 21st district Bryant Richardson, and perennial candidate Scott Walker. Murray narrowly defeated Bonini with a plurality of the vote. Carney won reelection by a large margin.

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Carney (incumbent) 101,142 84.77%
Democratic David Lamar Williams, Jr. 18,169 15.23%
Total votes 119,311 100.0%

Republican primary

Republican primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Julianne Murray 22,819 41.15%
Republican Colin Bonini 19,161 34.56%
Republican Bryant Richardson 4,262 7.69%
Republican Scott Walker 3,998 7.21%
Republican David Bosco 3,660 6.60%
Republican David Graham 1,547 2.79%
Total votes 55,447 100.0%

Indiana

2020 Indiana gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Holcomb Official Headshot (cropped).jpg
Donald Rainwater.png
Nominee Eric Holcomb Woody Myers Donald Rainwater
Party Republican Democratic Libertarian
Running mate Suzanne Crouch Linda Lawson William Henry
Popular vote 1,706,739 968,106 345,569
Percentage 56.5% 32.1% 11.4%

2020 Indiana gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Holcomb:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%
Myers:      50-60%

Governor before election

Eric Holcomb
Republican

Elected Governor

Eric Holcomb
Republican

One-term incumbent Republican Eric Holcomb ran for re-election in 2020 alongside his running mate Suzanne Crouch. Holcomb ran against the Democratic nominee, former Health Commissioner of Indiana Woody Myers, and his running mate Linda Lawson, the former Minority Leader of the Indiana House of Representatives.[37] Donald Rainwater, a U.S. Navy veteran, was the Libertarian nominee.[38] Primaries were held on June 2, although both Holcomb and Myers ran uncontested. Holcomb won the election in a landslide, though Libertarian Donald Rainwater's 11% of the vote was the highest percentage of vote for a third party candidate in any of the 2020 gubernatorial race, and the highest any Libertarian candidate ever received in Indiana in a three-party race (The 2006 United States Senate election in Indiana saw the Libertarian candidate take 12.6% of the vote, but there was no Democratic candidate running).[39]

Republican primary

Republican primary results[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Eric Holcomb (Incumbent) 524,495 100.00%
Total votes 524,495 100.00%

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Woody Myers 408,230 100.00%
Total votes 408,230 100.00%

Missouri

2020 Missouri gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Mike Parson official photo (cropped).jpg
Nicole Galloway Photo (cropped).jpg
Nominee Mike Parson Nicole Galloway
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,713,152 1,216,192
Percentage 57.2% 40.6%

Missouri Governor Election Results 2020.svg
Preliminary County results
Parson:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%      80-90%
Galloway:      50-60%      80–90%

Governor before election

Mike Parson
Republican

Elected Governor

Mike Parson
Republican

One-term incumbent Republican Mike Parson took office upon Eric Greitens' resignation due to threatening the dissemination of sexual images and campaign finance violations.[41] Parson ran for election to a full term in 2020 and easily won the Republican primary. State auditor Nicole Galloway, Missouri's only Democratic statewide office holder, won the Democratic primary, defeating pastor Eric Morrison, and multiple other candidates including Jimmie Matthews, Antoin Johnson, and Robin Quaethem.[42] Primaries took place on August 4. The Libertarian nominee was U.S. Air Force veteran Rik Combs, while Jerome Bauer was the Green Party nominee.[43] Both candidates ran uncontested in their respective primaries. Despite predictions that this election could be close and that Parson could underperform national Republicans in the state, Parson won handily.

Republican primary

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Parson (incumbent) 510,471 74.9%
Republican Saundra McDowell 84,191 12.4%
Republican Jim Neely 59,451 8.7%
Republican Raleigh Ritter 27,181 4.0%
Total votes 681,294 100.00%

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nicole Galloway 453,331 84.6%
Democratic Eric Morrison 32,266 6.0%
Democratic Jimmie Matthews 20,458 3.8%
Democratic Antoin Johnson 20,169 3.8%
Democratic Robin Quaethem 9,452 1.8%
Total votes 535,676 100.00%

Montana

2020 Montana gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Greg Gianforte 115th congress (cropped).jpg
Mike Cooney in 2017.jpg
Nominee Greg Gianforte Mike Cooney
Party Republican Democratic
Running mate Kristen Juras Casey Schreiner
Popular vote 328,548 250,860
Percentage 54.4% 41.6%

Montana Governor Election Results by County, 2020.svg
County results
Gianforte:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%      >90%
Cooney:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%

Governor before election

Steve Bullock
Democratic

Elected Governor

Greg Gianforte
Republican

Two-term incumbent Democrat Steve Bullock was term-limited in 2020, making him the only incumbent governor in the United States (not counting U.S. territories) who was term-limited in this election year. This was therefore an open-seat election, and viewed as the most competitive gubernatorial election in the 2020 cycle. Primaries were held on June 2, with heavy competition in both. Bullock's lieutenant governor, Mike Cooney, a longtime local politician, was the Democratic nominee, defeating businesswoman and daughter of former U.S. representative Pat Williams, Whitney Williams, in the Democratic primary.[14][44][45] Cooney's running mate was Minority Leader of the Montana House of Representatives, Casey Schreiner. The Republican nominee was Montana's at-large congressman Greg Gianforte, who defeated Attorney General Tim Fox and State Senator from the 6th district, Albert Olszewski.[14][46][47][48] Gianforte's running mate was Kristen Juras, a businesswoman and attorney.[49] Gianforte was a controversial figure in the state, as he was arrested for body slamming a reporter the day of a 2017 special election. Despite predictions that this election would be close, Gianforte won by 12 points, making this the first time Montana has voted for a Republican for governor since 2000. This was the only gubernatorial seat to change parties in 2020.

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Cooney 81,527 54.86%
Democratic Whitney Williams 67,066 45.14%
Total votes 148,593 100.00%

Republican primary

Republican primary results[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg Gianforte 119,247 53.44%
Republican Tim Fox 60,823 27.26%
Republican Albert Olszewski 43,062 19.30%
Total votes 223,132 100.00%

New Hampshire

2020 New Hampshire gubernatorial election

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →
 
Christopher T Sununu.jpg
Dan Feltes NH (cropped 2).jpg
Nominee Chris Sununu Dan Feltes
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 516,609 264,639
Percentage 65.1% 33.4%

New Hampshire gubernatorial election, 2020 results by municipality.svg
Results by municipality

Governor before election

Chris Sununu
Republican

Elected Governor

Chris Sununu
Republican

New Hampshire is one of two states, alongside Vermont, that has two-year terms for their governors instead of four-year terms, meaning they held their gubernatorial latest elections in 2018. In December 2019, two-term incumbent Republican Chris Sununu announced that he would run for a third two-year term in 2020, ending speculation he would choose to run for the U.S. Senate instead. Sununu easily defeated Franklin city counselor Karen Testerman in the Republican primary.[51][52] In a hotly contested Democratic primary, Majority Leader of the New Hampshire Senate Dan Feltes narrowly defeated Andru Volinsky, a member of the Executive Council of New Hampshire from the 2nd district.[53][54][55][56] The primaries took place on September 8. Despite national Democrats winning by large margins in the state's presidential, senate, and house races, Sununu won by a large margin based on his popularity with voters of both parties.

Republican primary

Republican primary results[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Sununu (incumbent) 130,703 89.67%
Republican Karen Testerman 13,589 9.32%
Republican Nobody 1,239 0.85%
Democratic Dan Feltes (write-in) 133 0.09%
Democratic Andru Volinsky (write-in) 93 0.07%
Total votes 145,757 100.0%

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dan Feltes 72,318 50.90%
Democratic Andru Volinsky 65,455 46.06%
Republican Chris Sununu (write-in) 4,276 3.00%
Republican Karen Testerman (write-in) 39 0.03%
Republican Nobody (write-in) 6 0.01%
Total votes 142,094 100.0%

North Carolina

2020 North Carolina gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Gov. Cooper Cropped.jpg
Dan Forest - Flag (cropped).jpg
Nominee Roy Cooper Dan Forest
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,834,790 2,586,605
Percentage 51.5% 47.0%

2020 North Carolina gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Cooper:      40-50%      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%      80–90%
Forest:      40-50%      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Governor before election

Roy Cooper
Democratic

Elected Governor

Roy Cooper
Democratic

One-term incumbent Democrat Roy Cooper, who won his 2016 election by an extremely slim margin of only 10,281 votes,[59] ran for re-election in 2020. Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest was the Republican nominee.[60] Primaries were held on March 3, where Cooper defeated retired U.S. Army captain and perennial candidate Ernest T. Reeves in a landslide in the Democratic primary,[61] and Forest decisively defeated the North Carolina State Representative from the 20th district, Holly Grange, in the Republican primary.[61][62] Cooper won reelection as pundits predicted, though the margin was close. Cooper outperformed national Democrats in the state, who narrowly lost both the Presidential and Senate races.

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results [63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Roy Cooper (incumbent) 1,128,829 87.19%
Democratic Ernest T. Reeves 165,804 12.81%
Total votes 1,294,633 100.00%

Republican primary

Republican primary results [64]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Forest 698,077 88.95%
Republican Holly Grange 86,714 11.05%
Total votes 784,791 100.00%

North Dakota

2020 North Dakota gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Governor Doug Burgum.jpg
Nominee Doug Burgum Shelley Lenz
Party Republican Democratic-NPL
Running mate Brent Sanford Ben Vig
Popular vote 235,479 90,789
Percentage 65.8% 25.4%

2020 North Dakota gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Burgum:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%      80-90%
Lenz:      50-60%      60-70%

Governor before election

Doug Burgum
Republican

Elected Governor

Doug Burgum
Republican

One-term incumbent Republican Doug Burgum ran for re-election in 2020. Brent Sanford, the incumbent lieutenant governor, remained his running mate. The Democratic nominee was veterinarian and former Killdeer school board member Shelly Lenz, whose running mate was Ben Vig, a former member of the North Dakota House of Representatives from the 23rd district. Primaries were held on June 9, with Burgum winning by a landslide margin over U.S. Air Force veteran Michael Coachman and Lenz running uncontested. Burgum won reelection in a landslide.

Republican primary

Republican primary results [65]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Doug Burgum (incumbent) 93,737 89.60%
Republican Michael Coachman 10,577 10.11%
Republican Write-In 300 0.29%
Total votes 104,614 100.0%

Democratic primary

North Dakota Democratic–Nonpartisan League Party primary results[65]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic-NPL Shelley Lenz 33,386 99.45%
Democratic-NPL Write-In 186 0.55%
Total votes 33,572 100.00%

Utah

2020 Utah gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Spencer Cox in 2017.jpg
No image.svg
Nominee Spencer Cox Christopher Peterson
Party Republican Democratic
Running mate Deidre Henderson Karina Brown
Popular vote 918,754 442,754
Percentage 64.3% 31.0%

2020 Utah gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Cox:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%      80-90%
Peterson:      40-50%      50-60%

Governor before election

Gary Herbert
Republican

Elected Governor

Spencer Cox
Republican

Two and a half-term incumbent Republican Gary Herbert was eligible for re-election in 2020, as Utah does not have gubernatorial term limits. However, he announced shortly after being re-elected in 2016 that he would not run for a third full term.[66] Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox defeated multiple other high-profile Republicans in the competitive Republican primary on June 30 including former governor Jon Hunstman, Jr., Speaker of the Utah House of Representatives Greg Hughes, and former Chairman of the Utah Republican Party Thomas Wright. Cox's running mate for Lieutenant Governor was Utah Senator from the 7th district, Deidre Henderson. Meanwhile, University of Utah law professor Christopher Peterson won an overwhelming majority of delegates at the Utah Democratic Convention, immediately awarding him with the Democratic nomination alongside his running mate, community organizer Karina Brown.[67][68][69] During the general election campaign, an advertisement featuring Cox and Peterson together calling for unity went viral.[70] Cox won in a landslide, outperforming national Republicans in the state.

Republican Convention results

Republican convention results[71]
Candidate/Running mate Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Spencer Cox/Deidre Henderson 1081 30.2% 1082 30.2% 1223 34.3% 1287 36.3% 1488 42.4% 1884 55.0%
Greg Hughes/Victor Iverson 663 18.5% 674 18.8% 719 20.2% 901 25.4% 1107 31.5% 1544 45.0%
Aimee Winder Newton/John 'Frugal' Dougall 500 14.0% 508 14.2% 540 15.1% 703 19.8% 918 Eliminated
Thomas Wright/Rob Bishop 489 13.7% 494 13.8% 553 15.5% 658 Eliminated
Jeff Burningham/Dan McCay 487 13.6% 504 14.1% 530 Eliminated
Jon Huntsman Jr./Michelle Kaufusi 315 8.8% 315 Eliminated
Jason Christensen/Drew Chamberlain 44 Eliminated
Inactive Ballots 0 ballots 2 ballots 14 ballots 30 ballots 66 ballots 151 ballots

Republican primary

Republican primary results[72]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Spencer Cox 176,012 36.60%
Republican Jon Huntsman Jr. 165,083 34.33%
Republican Greg Hughes 101,500 21.11%
Republican Thomas Wright 38,274 7.96%
Total votes 480,869 100.00%

Democratic Convention results

Democratic convention results[73]
Candidate Pct.
Christopher Peterson 88.4%
Zachary Moses 4.7%
Neil Hansen 4.0%
Nikki Ray Pino 1.4%
Ryan Jackson 1.4%
Archie Williams III 0.1%

Vermont

2020 Vermont gubernatorial election

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →
 
Phil Scott 2017 (cropped).jpg
Lt Gov David Zuckerman.jpg
Nominee Phil Scott David Zuckerman
Party Republican Progressive
Alliance Democratic
Popular vote 248,412 99,214
Percentage 68.5% 27.4%

2020 Vermont gubernatorial election - Results by municipality.svg
Town results

Governor before election

Phil Scott
Republican

Elected Governor

Phil Scott
Republican

Two-term incumbent Republican Phil Scott confirmed he was seeking a third term in 2020. However, he did not campaign due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the handling of which awarded Scott with a 75% approval rating in the summer.[74] Scott was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2018. Scott is a heavy critic of President Donald Trump, who holds a net negative 39% disapproval rating in the Green Mountain State.[75][76] He is one of the last remaining liberal Republican politicians with center-left political leanings, and remains an outlier in the otherwise staunchly Democratic state.[77][78] Primary elections were held on August 11. Scott defeated multiple challengers in the Republican primary, the most prominent of which was lawyer and pastor John Klar.[79] Lieutenant Governor David Zuckerman defeated former education secretary Rebecca Holcombe in the Democratic primary.[80] He also defeated Cris Ericson and Boots Wardinski in the Vermont Progressive Party primary, despite only being recognized as a write-in candidate. Zuckerman was endorsed by U.S. Senator from Vermont Bernie Sanders, the most popular senator amongst his constituents in the country.[81][82] Zuckerman chose to run under the Progressive Party ballot line in the general election, listing the Democratic Party as a secondary nomination, utilizing Vermont's electoral fusion system. Despite Vermont being one of the most heavily Democratic states in the nation with a partisan voting index of D+15, Scott won reelection in a landslide because of his widespread popularity and focus on local issues. Scott has also been praised for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. Zuckerman had also made past comments perceived as being anti-vaccination.[83]

Republican primary

Republican primary results[84]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Phil Scott (incumbent) 42,275 72.67%
Republican John Klar 12,762 21.94%
Republican Emily Peyton 970 1.67%
Republican Douglas Cavett 966 1.66%
Republican Bernard Peters 772 1.33%
Republican Write-ins 426 0.73%
Total votes 58,171 100.0%

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[84]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Zuckerman 48,150 47.56%
Democratic Rebecca Holcombe 37,599 37.14%
Democratic Patrick Winburn 7,662 7.57%
Democratic Write-ins 6,533 6.45%
Democratic Ralph Corbo 1,288 1.27%
Total votes 101,232 100.0%

Progressive primary

Progressive primary results[84]
Party Candidate Votes %
Progressive David Zuckerman (write-in) 273 32.62%
Progressive Cris Ericson 254 30.35%
Progressive Boots Wardinski 239 28.55%
Progressive Phil Scott (write-in) 41 4.90%
Progressive Other Write-ins 30 3.58%
Total votes 837 100.0%

Washington

2020 Washington gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Jay Inslee official portrait 2020 (cropped).jpg
Loren Culp.png
Nominee Jay Inslee Loren Culp
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,294,243 1,749,066
Percentage 56.56% 43.12%

2020 Washington gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
Preliminary County results
Inslee:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%
Culp:      50-60%      60-70%      70-80%

Governor before election

Jay Inslee
Democratic

Elected Governor

Jay Inslee
Democratic

Two-term incumbent Democrat Jay Inslee was eligible to run for re-election in 2020, as Washington does not have gubernatorial term limits. Inslee ran for re-election to a third term after dropping out of the Democratic presidential primaries on August 21, 2019.[85][86] He faced police chief of the city of Republic, Washington, Loren Culp.[87] A top-two, jungle primary took place on August 4, meaning that all candidates appeared on the same ballot regardless of party affiliation and the top two (Inslee and Culp) advanced to the general election in November. Washington is one of two states in the country, alongside California and Louisiana (and Nebraska for statewide offices), that holds jungle primaries rather than conventional ones.[88] Inslee won both the primary and general elections in a landslide, becoming the first governor of Washington in decades to be elected to a third term. Culp refused to concede, citing false claims of election fraud.[89]

Primary election

Top-two primary election results[90]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jay Inslee (incumbent) 1,247,916 50.14%
Republican Loren Culp 433,238 17.41%
Republican Joshua Freed 222,533 8.94%
Republican Tim Eyman 159,495 6.41%
Republican Raul Garcia 135,045 5.43%
Republican Phil Fortunato 99,265 3.99%
Democratic Don L. Rivers 25,601 1.03%
Trump Republican Party Leon Aaron Lawson 23,073 0.93%
Green Liz Hallock 21,537 0.87%
Democratic Cairo D'Almeida 14,657 0.59%
Trump Republican Party Anton Sakharov 13,935 0.56%
Pre2016 Republican Party Nate Herzog 11,303 0.45%
Democratic Gene Hart 10,605 0.43%
Democratic Omari Tahir Garrett 8,751 0.35%
Unaffiliated Party Ryan Ryals 6,264 0.25%
Socialist Workers Henry Clay Dennison 5,970 0.24%
Trump Republican Party Goodspaceguy 5,646 0.23%
Republican Richard L. Carpenter 4,962 0.2%
Independent Elaina J. Gonzales 4,772 0.19%
Republican Matthew Murray 4,489 0.18%
Independent Thor Amundson 3,638 0.15%
Republican Bill Hirt 2,854 0.11%
Republican Martin L. Wheeler 2,686 0.11%
Republican Ian Gonzales 2,537 0.1%
New-Liberty Party Joshua Wolf 2,315 0.09%
No Party Preference Cregan M. Newhouse 2,291 0.09%
No Party Preference Brian R. Weed 2,178 0.09%
StandupAmerica Party Alex Tsimerman 1,721 0.07%
Republican Tylor Grow 1,509 0.06%
Independent Dylan B. Nails 1,470 0.06%
Independent Craig Campbell 1,178 0.05%
American Patriot Party William Miller 1,148 0.05%
No Party Preference Cameron M. Vessey 718 0.03%
Propertarianist Party Winston Wilkes 702 0.03%
Fifth Republic Party David W. Blomstrom 519 0.02%
Cascadia Labour Party David Voltz 480 0.02%
Write-in 1,938 0.08%
Total votes 2,488,959 100%

West Virginia

2020 West Virginia gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Governor Jim Justice 2017.jpg
Ben Salango.png
Nominee Jim Justice Ben Salango
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 492,743 233,704
Percentage 64.9% 30.8%

2020 West Virginia gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Justice:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

Governor before election

Jim Justice
Republican

Elected Governor

Jim Justice
Republican

One-term incumbent Republican Jim Justice ran for re-election in 2020. Justice was elected as a Democrat, but later switched to the Republican Party, making him the first Republican governor since Cecil H. Underwood, elected from 1997 until 2001.[91] Justice faced centrist Democrat Ben Salango, who was endorsed by U.S. Senator Joe Manchin. Primaries were held on June 9, with Justice defeating former West Virginia Secretary of Commerce Woody Thrasher and former member of the West Virginia House of Delegates from the 63rd district, Mike Folk, by a large margin. Meanwhile, Salango won by a slim margin in a hotly contested Democratic primary between Salango and community organizer Stephen Smith,[92] businessman Jody Murphy,[93] and Douglas Hughes.

Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, retired Olympic gymnast Mary Lou Retton,[91] and Secretary of State Mac Warner were mentioned as potential general election challengers, prior to Justice's decision to re-join the Republican Party.

Justice won reelection in a landslide.

Republican primary

Republican primary results [94]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Justice (incumbent) 133,586 62.60%
Republican Woody Thrasher 38,891 18.20%
Republican Michael Folk 27,255 12.80%
Republican Doug Six 4,413 2.13%
Republican Brooke Lunsford 3,837 1.82%
Republican Shelly Jean Fitzhugh 2,815 1.29%
Republican Chuck Sheedy 2,539 1.16%
Total votes 213,336 100.0%

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[95]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ben Salango 73,099 38.78%
Democratic Stephen Smith 63,281 33.57%
Democratic Ron Stollings 25,322 13.43%
Democratic Jody Murphy 17,692 9.39%
Democratic Douglas Hughes 9,100 4.83%
Total votes 188,494 100.0%

Puerto Rico

2020 Puerto Rico gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Pedro-Pierluisi-cropped 2.jpg
Nominee Pedro Pierluisi Carlos Delgado Altieri Alexandra Lúgaro
Party New Progressive Popular Democratic Citizen's Victory Movement
Alliance Democratic
Popular vote 406,830 389,896 175,583
Percentage 32.93% 31.56% 14.21%

 
Juan Dalmau Ramírez (portrait).jpg
Nominee Juan Dalmau César Vázquez Muñiz
Party Puerto Rican Independence Party Project Dignity
Popular vote 169,516 85,211
Percentage 13.72% 6.9%

Governor before election

Wanda Vázquez
New Progressive Party

Elected Governor

Pedro Pierluisi
New Progressive Party

Incumbent governor Wanda Vázquez Garced of the New Progressive Party and the Republican Party, who became governor after Pedro Pierluisi's succession of Ricardo Rosselló was declared unconstitutional,[96] was defeated in the New Progressive primary by Pierluisi in her bid to win a full term. He faced Isabela mayor Carlos Delgado Altieri, who won the Popular Democratic Party primary, as well as Senator Juan Dalmau of the Puerto Rican Independence Party, Alexandra Lúgaro of Movimiento Victoria Ciudadana, César Vázquez of Proyecto Dignidad, and independent candidate Eliezer Molina.[26] Pierluisi won the election by a very slim margin.

New Progressive Primary

New Progressive Party primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
New Progressive Pedro Pierluisi 162,345 57.67%
New Progressive Wanda Vázquez Garced (incumbent) 119,184 42.33%
Total votes 281,529 100.00%

Popular Democratic Primary

Popular Democratic Party primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Popular Democratic Carlos Delgado Altieri 128,638 62.97%
Popular Democratic Eduardo Bhatia 48,563 23.77%
Popular Democratic Carmen Yulín Cruz 27,068 13.25%
Total votes 204,269 100.00%

American Samoa

2020 American Samoa gubernatorial election

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
 
Lemanu Peleti Mauga (cropped).png
Nominee Lemanu Peleti Mauga Gaoteote Palaie Tofau
Party Nonpartisan Nonpartisan
Running mate Eleasalo Ale Faiivae Iuli Alex Godinet
Popular vote 7,154 2,594
Percentage 60.3% 21.9%

 
Nominee Iʻaulualo Faʻafetai Talia Nuanuaolefeagaiga Saoluaga T. Nua
Party Nonpartisan Nonpartisan
Running mate Tapaʻau Dr. Dan Mageo Aga Tapumanaia Galu Satele Jr.
Popular vote 1,461 652
Percentage 12.3% 5.5%

Governor before election

Lolo Matalasi Moliga
Nonpartisan

Elected Governor

Lemanu Peleti Mauga
Nonpartisan

Two-term incumbent Governor Lolo Letalu Matalasi Moliga was term-limited in 2020. Running to replace him were Lieutenant Governor Lemanu Palepoi Sialega Mauga, American Samoa Senate President Gaoteote Palaie Tofau, territorial Senator Nua Sao, and executive director of the American Samoa Government Employees' Retirement Fund Iʻaulualo Faʻafetai Talia. Although individuals can and do affiliate with political parties, elections are held on a non-partisan basis with candidates running without party labels and no party primaries. The governor and lieutenant governor are elected on a shared ticket. The Mauga–Ale ticket won the elction with more than 60% of the vote.[97]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Mike Parson of Missouri, who took office in 2018 after the resignation of Eric Greitens, was elected to his first full-term.
  2. ^ Governor Jim Justice was orginially elected as a Democrat before switching back to a Republican in 2017. Justice is currently running for reelection as a Republican.[13]
  3. ^ Governor Jim Justice was originally elected in 2016 as a democrat, but switched to the Republican party in 2017. He won reelection in 2020 as a Republican.
  4. ^ Mike Parson took office in 2018 after his predecessor (Eric Greitens) resigned.
  5. ^ Gary Herbert took office in 2009 after his predecessor (Jon Huntsman Jr.) resigned.
  6. ^ The governor of American Samoa is elected on a non-partisan basis, although individuals do affiliate with national parties, in Moliga and Mauga's cases with the Democratic Party and in Sao's case with the Republican Party.
  7. ^ Vázquez took office in 2019 following the resignation of her predecessor Ricardo Rosselló and the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico's ruling that Pedro Pierluisi had been improperly named Rosselló's successor.
  8. ^ Wanda Vázquez affiliates with the Republican Party on the national level; Pedro Pierluisi affiliates with the Democratic Party on the national level.
  9. ^ Because of a lack of ballots at about half of Puerto Rico's 110 voting locations, the August 9 primaries were suspended until August 16.[31]

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External links

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