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2020 California Democratic presidential primary

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 California Democratic presidential primary

← 2016 March 3, 2020 2024 →
← AR
CO →

494 Democratic National Convention delegates (415 pledged, 79 unpledged)
The number of pledged delegates won is determined by the popular vote
 
Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg
Joe Biden February 2020 crop.jpg
Candidate Bernie Sanders Joe Biden
Home state Vermont Delaware
Delegate count 225 172
Popular vote 2,080,846 1,613,854
Percentage 35.97% 27.90%

 
Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Elizabeth Warren Michael Bloomberg
Home state Massachusetts New York
Delegate count 11 7
Popular vote 762,555 701,803
Percentage 13.18% 12.13%

California Democratic presidential primary election results by county, 2020.svg
2020CADprimary.svg
  Joe Biden
  Bernie Sanders

The 2020 California Democratic presidential primary took place in California, United States, on March 3, 2020, as one of 14 contests scheduled on Super Tuesday in the Democratic Party primaries for the 2020 presidential election, following the South Carolina primary the weekend before. The California primary is a semi-closed primary, with the state awarding 494 delegates towards the 2020 Democratic National Convention, of which 415 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the primary.

The Associated Press declared Bernie Sanders the winner of the primary, improving on his polling average by 3%.[1] The runner-up, Joe Biden, had a stronger than expected finish to match his Super Tuesday momentum.[2]

Procedure

California was one of 14 states that held its primaries on March 3, 2020, also known as "Super Tuesday",[3] having joined other states on the date after the signing of the Prime Time Primary Act by Governor Jerry Brown on September 27, 2017, in an effort to increase the influence of the delegate-rich state in the nomination process.[4]

Candidates may obtain ballot access in a number of ways. They must have.:

  • "...qualified for funding under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1974 (52 U.S.C. Sec. 30101, et seq.)
  • appeared as a candidate in a national presidential debate hosted by a political party qualified to participate in a primary election, with at least two participating candidates, and publicly available for viewing by voters in more than one state during the current presidential election cycle. A “political party qualified to participate in a primary election” means any political party qualified in California, a major or minor-ballot qualified political party in another state, or a national committee of a political party recognized by the Federal Election Commission
  • placed or qualified for placement on a presidential primary ballot or a caucus ballot of a major or minor ballot-qualified political party in at least one other state in the current presidential election cycle
  • candidate or qualified to be a candidate in a caucus of a major or minor ballot-qualified political party in at least one other state in the current presidential election cycle
  • has the following: current presidential campaign internet website or webpage hosted by the candidate or a qualified political party, and a written request submitted on the candidate's behalf by a party qualified to participate in the primary election to the Secretary of State requesting the candidate be placed on the presidential primary ballot."

If they do not have at least one of those qualifications, they may submit petitions of 500 signatures from each of the state's congressional districts obtained from November 4 to December 13, 2019.

The official list of qualified candidates was released on December 6, 2019. Unqualified candidates were required to submit their petitions by this date.

Military and overseas mail-in ballots were sent out on January 3, 2020, and domestic mail-in ballots were requested and sent out from February 3 to February 25. Early voting centers opened for business on February 22 and will continue until March 3.

Election day voting took place throughout the state from 7 a.m. until 8 p.m. In the semi-closed primary, candidates must meet a threshold of 15 percent at the congressional district or statewide level in order to be considered viable. The 415 pledged delegates to the 2020 Democratic National Convention will be allocated proportionally on the basis of the results of the primary. Of the 415 pledged delegates, between 4 and 7 are allocated to each of the state's 53 congressional districts, and another 54 are allocated to party leaders and elected officials (PLEO delegates), in addition to 90 at-large pledged delegates.[5]

Following the primary, district-level delegates to the national convention will be elected on April 19, 2020, in the post-primary caucus. Should presidential candidates be allocated more delegates based on the results of the primary than delegate candidates presented, then supplemental delegates will be elected at caucuses on May 9, 2020. The national convention delegation meeting will subsequently be held on May 17, 2020, to vote on the 54 pledged PLEO and 90 at-large delegates to send to the Democratic National Convention. The 415 pledged delegates California sends to the national convention will be joined by 79 un-pledged superdelegates (30 members of the Democratic National Committee; 48 members of Congress[6]; and the governor).[5]

Candidates

The following candidates appear in the Certified List of Statewide Candidates:[7]

Running

Withdrawn

Polling

Polling Aggregation
Source of poll aggregation Date
updated
Dates
polled
Bernie
Sanders
Joe
Biden
Elizabeth
Warren
Michael
Bloomberg
Tulsi
Gabbard
Other/
Undecided[b]
270 to Win March 3, 2020 February 20–March 1, 2020 33.0% 20.0% 14.4% 15.0% 1.2% 16.4%
RealClear Politics March 3, 2020 February 28–March 2, 2020 35.0% 23.0% 16.0% 14.0% 1.5% 10.5%[c]
FiveThirtyEight March 3, 2020 until March 2, 2020[d] 31.2% 21.7% 14.9% 14.7% 0.7% 16.8%
Average 33.1% 21.6% 15.1% 14.6% 1.1% 14.5%
California primary results (March 3, 2020) 36.0% 27.9% 13.2% 12.1% 0.6% 10.2%
Polling from January 1, 2020 to March 3, 2020
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[e]
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Michael
Bloomberg
Pete
Buttigieg
Amy
Klobuchar
Bernie
Sanders
Tom
Steyer
Elizabeth
Warren
Andrew
Yang
Other Undecided
Mar 2, 2020 Klobuchar withdraws from the race
Swayable March 1–2, 2020 3,388 (LV) ± 2.0% 20.8% 19.3% 8.4% 3.3% 28.7% 4.0% 9.6% 6.0%[f]
Data for Progress February 28–March 2, 2020 516 (LV) ± 4.3% 25% 17% 5% 3% 32% 16% 1%[g]
AtlasIntel February 24–March 2, 2020 727 (LV) ± 4.0% 26% 15% 3% 1% 34% 15% 2%[h] 4%
Mar 1, 2020 Buttigieg withdraws from the race
Point Blank Political February 29–March 1, 2020 1,220 (LV) ± 4.1% 22% 10% 6% 3% 34% 1% 14% 1%[i] 9%
Emerson College/Nexstar February 29–March 1, 2020 545 (LV) ± 4.1% 21% 11% 7% 5% 38% 2% 16% 1%[j]
February 29, 2020 South Carolina primary; Steyer withdraws from the race after close of polls
YouGov/CBS News February 27–29, 2020 1,411 (LV) ± 4.0% 19% 12% 9% 4% 31% 3% 18% 4%[k]
Suffolk University February 26–29, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 14% 16% 7% 5% 35% 3% 12% 3%[l]
YouGov/Hoover
Institution/Stanford University
February 26–28, 2020 1,020 (LV) 19% 13% 9% 6% 28% 4% 18% 3%[m]
Point Blank Political February 26–28, 2020 2,276 (LV) ± 2.9% 14% 12% 9% 3% 34% 3% 14% 1%[n] 10%
40%[o] 50% 11%
32%[p] 57% 11%
46%[q] 36% 16%
CNN/SSRS February 22–26, 2020 488 (LV) ± 5.2% 13% 12% 7% 6% 35% 3% 14% 3%[r] 8%
February 25, 2020 Tenth Democratic primary debate
Point Blank Political February 23–25, 2020 2,098 (LV) ± 3.0% 11% 11% 9% 4% 34% 3% 13% 2%[s] 13%
Berkeley IGS/LA Times Feb 20–25, 2020 3,002 (LV) ± 2.0% 8% 12% 11% 6% 34% 2% 17% 1% 2%[t] 7%
February 22, 2020 Nevada caucuses
Change Research/KQED News February 20–23, 2020 1,069 (LV) ± 3.4% 12% 6% 11% 5% 37% 3% 20% 4%[u] 3%[v]
University of Massachusetts Lowell February 12–20, 2020 450 (LV) ± 6.7% 13% 12% 12% 7% 24% 2% 16% 7%[w] 6%
Monmouth University February 16–19, 2020 408 (LV) ± 4.9% 17% 13% 9% 4% 24% 5% 10% 3%[x] 13%
36%[y] 44% 15%[z] 5%
31%[aa] 48% 14%[ab] 6%
26%[ac] 51% 16%[ad] 7%
24%[ae] 54% 16%[af] 6%
Public Policy Institute of California February 7–17, 2020 573 (LV) ± 5.7% 14% 12% 12% 5% 32% 3% 13% 2%[ag] 8%
SurveyUSA February 13–16, 2020 520 (LV) ± 4.8% 15% 21% 12% 6% 25% 3% 9% 1%[ah] 9%
YouGov/USC February 1–15, 2020 21% 8% 6% 3% 29% 2% 20% 2%[ai] 9%[aj]
February 11, 2020 New Hampshire primary; Yang withdraws from the race after close of polls
Capitol Weekly Feb 6–9, 2020 843 (LV) 8%[ak] 8% 15% 7% 25% 4% 19% 5% 6%[al] 3%[am]
11% 13% 14% 5% 29% 3% 16% 4% 5%[an] 1%[ao]
February 3, 2020 Iowa Caucuses
Change Research/KQED News January 25–27, 2020 1,967 (LV) 15% 4% 8% 3% 30% 2% 16% 5% 4%[ap] 13%
Berkeley IGS/LA Times January 15–21, 2020 2,895 (LV) ± 2.5% 15.0% 6.0% 7.2% 4.9% 26.3% 1.8% 19.6% 3.9% 3.6%[aq] 11.7%
SurveyUSA January 14–16, 2020 565 (LV) ± 5.1% 30% 6% 8% 2% 20% 4% 20% 4% 2%[ar] 4%
January 13, 2020 Booker withdraws from the race
Public Policy Institute of California/Mercury News January 3–12, 2020 530 (LV) ± 6.5% 24% 1% 6% 4% 27% 23% 3% 5%[as] 7%
Tulchin Research/USC Rossier/The Hill January 3–10, 2020 1,121 (LV) 25% 7% 8% 2% 29% 3% 12% 5% 2%[at] 6%
Capitol Weekly January 1–9, 2020 1,053 (LV) 20% 6% 11% 5% 24% 2% 21% 7% 3%[au]
Polling before January 2020
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[e]
Margin
of error
Joe
Biden
Cory
Booker
Pete
Buttigieg
Kamala
Harris
Beto
O'Rourke
Bernie
Sanders
Elizabeth
Warren
Andrew
Yang
Other Undecided
Change Research/KQED News December 6–10, 2019 862 (LV) ± 3.3% 19% 3% 12% 26% 23% 4% 13%[av]
CNN/SSRS December 4–8, 2019 508 (LV) ± 5.2% 21% 3% 9% 20% 17% 6% 12%[aw] 11%
Capitol Weekly December 3–7, 2019 581 (LV) [ax] 19% 2% 14% 19% 23% 5% 17%[ay] 1%
19% 2% 13% 4% 19% 21% 5% 17%[az] 0%
December 3, 2019 Harris withdraws from the race
Berkeley IGS/LA Times November 21–27, 2019 1,252 (LV) 14% 1% 12% 7% 24% 22% 3% 12%[ba] 9%
SurveyUSA November 20–22, 2019 558 (LV) ± 4.8% 28% 3% 8% 10% 18% 13% 5% 11%[bb] 5%
Capitol Weekly November 1–12, 2019 695 (LV) 18% 1% 14% 6% 21% 27% 4% 8%[bc] 1%
Public Policy Institute of
California
November 3–12, 2019 682 (LV) 24% 1% 7% 8% 17% 23% 5% 6%[bd] 9%
November 1, 2019 O'Rourke withdraws from the race
Change Research October 15–18, 2019 1,631 (LV) 19% 1% 9% 8% 1% 24% 28% 3% 6%[be]
SurveyUSA October 15–16, 2019 553 (LV) ± 6.9% 33% 2% 4% 8% 2% 17% 18% 4% 5%[bf] 8%
Capitol Weekly October 1–14, 2019 590 (LV) 21% 2% 6% 8% 0% 15% 35% 3% 9%[bg]
Public Policy Institute of
California
September 16–25, 2019 692 (LV) ± 4.9% 22% 2% 6% 8% 1% 21% 23% 3% 7%[bh] 9%
Berkeley IGS/LA Times September 13–18, 2019 2,272 20% 1% 6% 8% 3% 19% 29% 2% 5%[bi] 8%
Emerson College September 13–16, 2019 424 ± 4.7% 26% 1% 4% 6% 5% 26% 20% 7% 4%[bj]
SurveyUSA September 13–15, 2019 547 ± 4.8% 27% 2% 3% 13% 2% 18% 16% 7% 4%[bk] 7%
Change Research/KQED September 12–15, 2019 3,325 ± 1.7% 18% 2% 10% 11% 2% 23% 25% 3% 5%[bl]
Capitol Weekly September 1–13, 2019 599 18% 1% 7% 11% 2% 21% 29% 4% 5%[bm]
Capitol Weekly September 1–13, 2019 5,510 18% 1% 8% 11% 2% 17% 33% 3% 7%[bn]
SurveyUSA August 1–5, 2019 528 ± 6.3% 25% 1% 6% 17% 0% 18% 21% 1% 1%[bo] 10%
PPIC July 14–23, 2019 766 ± 4.4% 11% 5% 19% 12% 15% 14%[bp] 25%
YouGov/CBS News July 9–18, 2019 1,514 ± 2.9% 24% 1% 6% 23% 1% 16% 19% 1% 9%[bq]
Quinnipiac University July 10–15, 2019 519 ± 5.7% 21% 1% 3% 23% 1% 18% 16% 2% 2%[br] 10%
Capitol Weekly July 1–15, 2019 816 20% 1% 8% 20% 2% 16% 25% 1% 7%[bs]
Change Research July 9–11, 2019 1,609 ± 2.5% 17% 1% 8% 23% 2% 20% 22% 2% 5%[bt]
July 8, 2019 Swalwell withdraws from the race
Capitol Weekly[8] June 1–30, 2019 813 23% 2% 8% 14% 2% 19% 23% 2% 9%[bu]
UC Berkeley June 4–10, 2019 2,131 ± 3.0% 22% 1% 10% 13% 3% 17% 18% 1% 3%[bv] 11%
Capitol Weekly[8] May 1–31, 2019 1,180 29% 2% 9% 17% 4% 22% 11% 0% 6%[bw]
Change Research May 25–28, 2019 1,649 ± 2.4% 30% 1% 12% 15% 3% 23% 12% 1% 2%[bx]
Capitol Weekly[8] April 15–30, 2019 1,204 20% 2% 19% 17% 4% 20% 10% 9%[by]
April 25, 2019 Biden announces his candidacy
April 14, 2019 Buttigieg announces his candidacy
Change Research April 6–9, 2019 2,003 ± 2.2% 21% 3% 9% 19% 10% 22% 8% 1% 7%[bz]
5% 11% 27% 16% 28% 9% 1% 5%[ca]
April 8, 2019 Swalwell announces his candidacy
Quinnipiac University April 3–8, 2019 482 ± 5.9% 26% 2% 7% 17% 4% 18% 7% 1% 6%[cb] 13%
March 14, 2019 O'Rourke announces his candidacy
February 19, 2019 Sanders announces his candidacy
Change Research February 9–11, 2019 948 26% 3% 1% 26% 8% 20% 7% 0% 7%[cc]
7% 2% 53% 23% 1% 15%[cd]

Results

Bernie Sanders rally at the Los Angeles Convention Center
Bernie Sanders rally at the Los Angeles Convention Center
Senator Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in San Jose, California on March 1, 2020
Senator Bernie Sanders at a campaign rally in San Jose, California on March 1, 2020
Joe Biden's presidential campaign in Bel Air, Los Angeles on March 5, 2020
Joe Biden's presidential campaign in Bel Air, Los Angeles on March 5, 2020
2020 California Democratic presidential primary[9][10]
Candidate Votes % Delegates
Bernie Sanders 2,080,846 35.97 225
Joe Biden 1,613,854 27.90 172
Elizabeth Warren 762,555 13.18 11
Michael Bloomberg 701,803 12.13 7
Pete Buttigieg (withdrawn)[a] 249,256 4.31 0
Amy Klobuchar (withdrawn)[a] 126,961 2.19 0
Tom Steyer (withdrawn)[a] 113,092 1.96 0
Andrew Yang (withdrawn) 43,571 0.75 0
Tulsi Gabbard 33,769 0.58 0
Julian Castro (withdrawn) 13,892 0.24 0
Michael Bennet (withdrawn) 7,377 0.13 0
Marianne Williamson (withdrawn) 7,052 0.12 0
Rocky De La Fuente 6,151 0.11 0
Cory Booker (withdrawn) 6,000 0.10 0
John Delaney (withdrawn) 4,606 0.1 0
Michael Ellinger 3,424 0.08 0
Joe Sestak (withdrawn) 3,270 0.06 0
Mark Greenstein 3,190 0.06 0
Deval Patrick (withdrawn) 2,022 0.03 0
Mosie Boyd 1,639 0.03 0
Robert Jordan (write-in) 20 0.00 0
Daphne Bradford (write-in) 8 0.00 0
Nakia Anthony (write-in) 3 0.00 0
Willie Carter (write-in) 3 0.00 0
Michael Dename (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Jeffrey Drobman (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Heather Stagg (write-in) 0 0.00 0
Total votes 5,784,364 100% 415

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Candidate withdrew after early voting started, but before the date of the election.
  2. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined
  3. ^ includes Buttigieg with 6.0%; Klobuchar with 4.0%; Steyer not averaged
  4. ^ FiveThirtyEight aggregates polls with a trendline regression of polls rather than a strict average of recent polls.
  5. ^ a b Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  6. ^ Gabbard with 0.1%; "Other" with 5.9%
  7. ^ Gabbard with 1%
  8. ^ Gabbard with 1%; "Other" with 1%
  9. ^ Gabbard with 1%
  10. ^ Gabbard with 1%
  11. ^ Gabbard with 1%; "Someone else" with 3%
  12. ^ Gabbard with 3%
  13. ^ Gabbard with 3%
  14. ^ Gabbard with 1%
  15. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  16. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  17. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  18. ^ Gabbard with 1%; "Someone else" with 0%; "None/No one" with 2%
  19. ^ Gabbard with 2%
  20. ^ Gabbard with 1%; "Others" with 1%
  21. ^ Included in poll despite being withdrawn because he is still on the ballot.
  22. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Castro with 1%; Bennet, Williamson, Patrick, Sestak, Delaney, Greenstein, Ellinger, Boyd, and De La Fuente with 0%
  23. ^ Gabbard with 4%; "Another candidate" with 3%
  24. ^ Gabbard with 2%; "Other" with 1%
  25. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  26. ^ "Already voted" with 10%; "neither" with 5%
  27. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  28. ^ "Already voted" with 10%; "neither" with 4%
  29. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  30. ^ "Already voted" with 10%; "neither" with 6%
  31. ^ If only the two candidates for which percentages are listed could be voted for
  32. ^ "Already voted" with 10%; "neither" with 6%
  33. ^ Tulsi Gabbard 1%; someone else 1%
  34. ^ "Some other Democrat" with 1%
  35. ^ Gabbard with 2%
  36. ^ "someone else/skipped"
  37. ^ Answers listed in this row are for the question, "If electability wasn't a concern, who would you support?"
  38. ^ Gabbard with 3%; Booker with 2%; Williamson with 1%; Patrick with 0%
  39. ^ Listed as "no response"
  40. ^ Gabbard with 3%; Booker, Patrick and Williamson with 1%; Delaney with 0%
  41. ^ Listed as "no response"
  42. ^ Gabbard with 4%; Bennet, Delaney and Patrick with <1%
  43. ^ Gabbard with 1.4%; Bennet with 0.9%; Booker with 0.8%; "All others" with 0.5%
  44. ^ Gabbard with 2%; others with 0%
  45. ^ someone else (included Bloomberg) 6%
  46. ^ Booker and "someone else" with 1%
  47. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Booker with 1%; Delaney, Patrick and Williamson with 0%; no response with 0%
  48. ^ Bloomberg, Castro and Gabbard with 3%; Steyer with 2%; Klobuchar and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Delaney and Patrick with 0%
  49. ^ Bloomberg with 5%; Gabbard and Klobuchar with 2%; Castro and Steyer with 1%; Bennet, Delaney, Patrick, and Williamson with 0%; "None/No one" with 1%
  50. ^ The top row presents results which exclude Kamala Harris as an option.
  51. ^ Bloomberg with 5%; Gabbard and Klobuchar with 4%; Castro with 2%; Steyer and Williamson with 1%; Delaney and Patrick with 0%
  52. ^ Bloomberg with 5%; Gabbard and Klobuchar with 4%; Castro, Steyer and Williamson with 1%; Delaney with 0%; Patrick with no voters
  53. ^ Klobuchar with 3%; Bloomberg with 2%; Bennet, Castro, Gabbard, Steyer with 1%, Bullock, Delaney, Patrick, Sestak and Williamson with 0%
  54. ^ Bloomberg and Steyer with 3%; Gabbard with 2%; Castro and Klobuchar with 1%; Patrick with 0%; others with 1%
  55. ^ Gabbard and Klobuchar with 3%; Steyer and Williamson with 1%; Castro and Delaney with 0%
  56. ^ Klobuchar and Steyer with 1%; other with 4%
  57. ^ Gabbard and Klobuchar with 2%; Steyer and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, Castro, Delaney, Messam, Ryan, and Sestak with 0%
  58. ^ Castro, Gabbard, Klobuchar, Steyer, and some other Democrat with 1%
  59. ^ Castro and Gabbard with 2%; Klobuchar, Steyer and Williamson with 1%; de Blasio and Ryan with 0%; no response with 2%
  60. ^ Castro with 2%; Klobuchar and Steyer with 1%; someone else with 3%
  61. ^ Klobuchar with 2%; Bennet, Castro and Gabbard with 1%; Bullock, de Blasio, Delaney, Messam, Ryan, Sestak, Steyer and Williamson with 0%;
  62. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Castro and Steyer with 1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Bullock, Delaney, Klobuchar, Messam, Ryan, Sestak and Williamson with 0%; someone else with 1%
  63. ^ Castro with 2%; Klobuchar with 1%; someone else with 1%
  64. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Castro, Klobuchar and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Bullock, Delaney, Messam, Ryan, Sestak and Steyer with 0%
  65. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Castro, Klobuchar and Williamson with 1%; Steyer with 0%
  66. ^ Gabbard with 3%; Castro, Klobuchar, Steyer and Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, de Blasio, Delaney and Ryan with 0%
  67. ^ Gabbard with 1%
  68. ^ "Anyone" with 2%; "None of them" with 5%; "Others" with 7%
  69. ^ Bennet, Castro, Gabbard, Gravel, Klobuchar, Steyer, Williamson with 1%; Bullock, de Blasio, Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, and Sestak with 0%
  70. ^ Castro and Inslee with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, de Blasio, Delaney, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Gravel, Hickenlooper, Klobuchar, Messam, Moulton, Ryan, Sestak, Steyer, and Williamson with <1%, others with <1%
  71. ^ Castro, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Inslee, Klobuchar, & Williamson with 1%; Bennet, Bullock, de Blasio, Delaney, Hickenlooper, Ryan, Swalwell & Steyer with 0%
  72. ^ Gabbard with 2%; Castro, Klobuchar & Inslee with 1%; Bennet, de Blasio, Delaney, Gillibrand, Gravel, Hickenlooper, Messam, Ryan, Sestak, Steyer & Williamson with 0%
  73. ^ Gabbard & Hickenlooper with 2%; Bennet, Gillibrand & Klobuchar with 1%; Bullock, Castro, de Blasio, Delaney, Inslee, Moulton, Ryan & Williamson with 0%
  74. ^ Castro and Klobuchar with 1%; Bullock, Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  75. ^ Castro, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Klobuchar, Ryan & Swalwell with 1%; Bullock, de Blasio, Gabbard, Inslee & Williamson with 0%
  76. ^ Castro and Gabbard with 1%; Abrams, Bennet, Gillibrand, Gravel, Hickenlooper, Klobuchar, Inslee, Moulton, Ryan, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  77. ^ Klobuchar with 3%; Inslee with 2%; Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Ryan & Swalwell with 1%; Castro with 0%
  78. ^ Castro with 2%; Abrams, Gabbard, Inslee, Klobuchar, and Swalwell with 1%; Bennet, Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Messam, Ryan, and Williamson with 0%
  79. ^ Castro with 2%; Gabbard, Klobuchar, and Ryan with 1%; Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Messam, and Williamson with 0%
  80. ^ Castro and Klobuchar with 2%; Gabbard and Inslee with 1%; Delaney, Gillibrand, Hickenlooper, Messam, and Williamson with <1%; others with <1%
  81. ^ Castro with 2%; Brown, Gabbard, Gillibrand, Holder, and Klobuchar with 1%; Bloomberg, Bullock, Cuomo, Delaney, Hickenlooper, Inslee, Swalwell, and Williamson with 0%
  82. ^ Castro with 6%; Gabbard with 4%; Delaney and Gillibrand with 2%; Williamson with 1%

References

  1. ^ "Exit and entrance polls from the 2020 primaries and caucuses". www.cnn.com. Retrieved 2020-03-10.
  2. ^ Martin, Jonathan; Burns, Alexander (2020-03-03). "Biden Revives Campaign, Winning Nine States, but Sanders Takes California". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-07-08.
  3. ^ Putnam, Josh. "The 2020 Presidential Primary Calendar". Frontloading HQ. Retrieved June 22, 2019.
  4. ^ Johnson, Alex (September 27, 2017). "California Primaries Move to Super Tuesday to Stop Being Irrelevant". NBC News. Retrieved June 22, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "California Democratic Delegation 2020". The Green Papers. June 21, 2019. Retrieved June 22, 2019.
  6. ^ These include former Presidential candidates Kamala Harris and Eric Swalwell.
  7. ^ "Certified List of Statewide Candidates" (PDF). CA Secretary of State. March 4, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c Aaron Bycoffe, Ritchie King and Dhrumil Mehta. "California Polls". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved 2019-09-01.
  9. ^ "Statement of Vote: Presidental Primary Election, March 3, 2020" (PDF). Secretary of State of California. May 1, 2020. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  10. ^ "2020 Presidential Primaries, Caucuses, and Conventions: California Democrat". The Green Papers. Retrieved July 12, 2020.

External links

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