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2020 Texas elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Texas state elections in 2020 were held on Tuesday, November 3, 2020. Its primaries were held on March 3, 2020, with runoffs taking place on July 14.[1]

In addition to the U.S. presidential race, Texas voters will elect the Class II U.S. Senator from Texas, 1 of 3 members of the Texas Railroad Commission, 8 of 15 members of the Texas Board of Education, all of its seats to the House of Representatives, 4 of 9 seats on the Supreme Court of Texas, 3 of 9 seats on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, 21 of 80 seats on the Texas Appellate Courts, all of the seats of the Texas House of Representatives and 17 of 34 seats in the Texas State Senate.

To vote by mail, registered Texas voters had to request a ballot by October 23, 2020.[2] After the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a bid to expand eligibility for requesting postal ballots,[3] postal ballots were available only to voters over 65, those sick or disabled, those who were out of their county on election day and those who were in jail (and otherwise eligible to vote), as defined by Texas law.[4]

Federal offices

President of the United States

Texas has 38 electoral votes in the Electoral College.

United States Class II Senate Seat

United States House of Representatives

There were 36 U.S. Representatives in Texas up for election in addition to 6 open seats.[5]

Railroad Commission

Republican primary

Nominee
  • James Wright[6]
Eliminated in primary
  • Ryan Sitton (incumbent and chair of the commission)[7]

Democratic primary

Nominee
  • Chrysta Castañeda[6]
Eliminated in runoff
  • Roberto Alonzo[7]
Eliminated in primary

Other candidates

  • Katija "Kat" Gruene (Green) (nominee)[6]
  • Matt Sterett (Libertarian) (nominee)[6]
  • Charlie Stevens (Libertarian) (defeated at party convention)[7]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jim
Wright (R)
Chrysta
Castañeda (D)
Matt
Sterett (L)
Other Undecided
YouGov/University of Houston Oct 13–20, 2020 1,000 (LV) ± 3.1% 47% 38% 3% 1%[b] 11%
Data for Progress/Texas Youth Power Alliance Aug 20–25, 2020 2,295 (LV) ± 2.0% 39% 33% 25%
Global Strategy Group/Chrysta for Texas[A] Aug 11-13, 2020 700 (LV) ± 3.7% 37% 31% 8% 24%

Results

2020 Texas Railroad Commission election[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican James Wright 5,831,263 53.01% {{{change}}}
Democratic Chrysta Castañeda 4,792,422 43.56%
Libertarian Matt Sterett 247,659 2.25%
Green Katija "Kat" Gruene 129,638 1.18%
Total votes 11,000,982 100.0%

State Board of Education

8 of 15 seats of the Texas Board of Education were up for election. Before the election the composition of that board was:

State Judiciary

Each of the state's two courts of last resort have 9 seats, all of which are currently occupied by Republican incumbents.[9]

Polling

Supreme Court Chief Justice
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Nathan
Hecht (R)
Amy Clark
Meachum (D)
Other Undecided
YouGov/University of Houston Oct 13–20, 2020 1,000 (LV) ± 3.1% 48% 40% 3%[c] 9%
Supreme Court Place 6
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jane
Bland (R)
Kathy
Cheng (D)
Undecided
YouGov/University of Houston Oct 13–20, 2020 1,000 (LV) ± 3.1% 49% 40% 11%
Court of Appeals Place 3
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Bert
Richardson (R)
Elizabeth
Davis Frizell (D)
Undecided
YouGov/University of Houston Oct 13–20, 2020 1,000 (LV) ± 3.1% 48% 38% 14%

Results

Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Nathan Hecht (I) 5,827,085 52.98%
Democratic Amy Clark Meachum 4,893,402 44.49%
Libertarian Mark Ash 277,491 2.52%
Total votes 10,997,978 100.0%
Texas Supreme Court, Place 6[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jane Bland (I) 6,050,534 55.24%
Democratic Kathy Cheng 4,903,527 44.76%
Total votes 10,954,061 100.0%
Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 3[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bert Richardson (I) 5,953,924 54.53%
Democratic Elizabeth Davis Frizell 4,964,460 45.47%
Total votes 10,918,384 100.0%

State Legislature

All 150 seats of the Texas House of Representatives and 16 of 31 seats of the Texas State Senate are up for election.

State Senate

Before the election the composition of the state senate was:

Party # of seats
Republican 19
Democratic 12
Total 31

House of Representatives

Before the election the composition of the state house was:

Party # of seats
Republican 83
Democratic 67
Total 150

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ Gruene (G) with 1%
  3. ^ Mark Ash (L) with 3%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll sponsored by Castañeda's campaign

References

  1. ^ "Texas elections, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  2. ^ Lily Hay Newman (August 27, 2020), "How to Vote by Mail and Make Sure It Counts", Wired.com, archived from the original on October 6, 2020
  3. ^ Ura, Alexa (June 26, 2020). "U.S. Supreme Court declines Texas Democrats' request to allow all Texans to vote by mail". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  4. ^ Application for a Ballot by Mail
  5. ^ "Live: Texas State Primary Election Results 2020". The New York Times. June 29, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d "Candidate Information". Texas Secretary of State. August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e "Texas Railroad Commissioner election, 2020". Ballotpedia. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d "Official Canvass Report - 2020 November 3rd General Election" (PDF). Texas Secretary of State. November 2020.
  9. ^ Pollock, Cassandra (July 13, 2020). "Republican Party of Texas leaders opt for virtual convention after loss at state Supreme Court". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  10. ^ Brent Kendall; Alexa Corse (October 11, 2020), "Pennsylvania, Texas and Ohio See Court Rulings Over Mail Ballots", The Wall Street Journal, Both political parties are mounting legal challenges across many states, with mail-in voting at the center
  11. ^ "Covered Areas for Voting Rights Bilingual Election Materials—2015", Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, Federal Register, retrieved October 13, 2020, A Notice by the Census Bureau on 12/05/2016

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 18 February 2021, at 16:33
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