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2020 Arizona elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 Arizona elections

← 2018
2022 →

A general election was held in the U.S. state of Arizona on November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 General Election. Arizona voters will choose 11 electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. Also three seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission are up for election, as well as all of Arizona's nine seats in the United States House of Representatives and one seat for the United States Senate. Primary elections were be held in August 2020. Paper ballots for voting by mail are being sent to all registered voters in the state.[1]

Federal offices

U.S. President

Arizona had 11 electoral votes in the electoral college. Joe Biden won all of them with 49% of the popular vote. It was the first time a Democratic presidential candidate has won Arizona since Bill Clinton in 1996.

U.S. Senate

A special election will be held due to the death of Republican incumbent John McCain.

Former U.S. senator Jon Kyl was originally appointed to the seat but Kyl resigned on December 31, 2018. Outgoing U.S. Representative Martha McSally was then appointed to fill the seat following Kyl's resignation.[2]

Democrat Mark Kelly defeated the incumbent Martha McSally, winning 51% of the votes.

U.S. House of Representatives

All of Arizona's nine seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for election in 2020. Before the election, Republicans held 4 seats and Democrats 5. No districts changed hands, thus the composition remained the same.

State offices

Corporation Commission

Three seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission are up for election. Republican Bob Burns is term-limited and ineligible to run for re-election to a third term in office.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates
Not on the Ballot
  • Avery Block
  • Boyd Dunn, incumbent. Removed for insufficient signatures.[6]
  • Neil DeSanti
  • Dave Farnsworth, state senator. Dropped out.[7]
  • Kim Owens, public relations executive. Removed for insufficient signatures.[8]
  • Patrick Tucker
  • Nick Myers, legislative candidate in 2018.

Democratic primary

Candidates
Not on the Ballot

General election

Polling

Each voter may select up to three candidates in the state Corporation Commission general election; the top three vote-getters win the seats. Consequently, poll results in the table immediately below are displayed as the accumulation of a candidate's first, second and third preferences and therefore sum to 300% instead of 100%. Where a given percentage of voters are not decided with respect to multiple choices, that percentage is multiplied by the number of choices for which they are undecided (so, for instance, if 1% of voters had not picked any candidate, they would be listed in the table below as 3% of the total vote).

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Anna
Tovar (D)
Lea Márquez
Peterson (R)
Bill
Mundell (D)
Shea
Stanfield (D)
James
O'Connor (R)
Eric
Sloan (R)
Undecided
Patinkin Research Strategies/Arizona Research Consortium (D) October 21–24, 2020 729 (LV) ± 3.6% 37% 31% 25% 24% 21% 20% 69%
Patinkin Research Strategies/Arizona Research Consortium (D) October 1–3, 2020 604 (LV) ± 3.8% 32% 30% 29% 28% 31% 31% 96%
Patinkin Research Strategies/Arizona Research Consortium (D) September 10–13, 2020 679 (LV) ± 3.8% 28% 26% 27% 26% 29% 27% 120%
Results
Arizona Corporation Commission election, 2020[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anna Tovar 1,450,194 17.52
Republican Lea Márquez Peterson (incumbent) 1,449,963 17.52
Republican James O'Connor 1,434,236 17.33
Republican Eric Sloan 1,379,804 16.67
Democratic Bill Mundell 1,295,836 15.66
Democratic Shea Stanfield 1,264,909 15.28
Independent Christina Gibson (write-in) 411 0.00
Republican Patrick Finerd (write-in) 232 0.00
Total votes 8,275,585 100.00
Democratic gain from Republican
Republican hold
Republican hold

Ballot initiatives

Two initiatives were approved for the General Election ballot.[10]

Proposition 207

Proposition 207, the Smart and Safe Arizona Act, is to legalise and tax cannabis for adult use.

Polling

Likely voters polled in July 2020 indicated 62% support for cannabis legalization.[11]

On Proposition 207
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
For Proposition 207 Against Proposition 207 Other Undecided
OH Predictive Insights October 22–25, 2020 716 (LV) ± 3.7% 60% 36% 0%[b] 4%
Monmouth University October 11–13, 2020 502 (RV) ± 4.4% 56% 36% 0%[c] 7%
OH Predictive Insights October 4–8, 2020 608 (LV) ± 3.97% 55% 37% 1%[d] 7%
Suffolk University September 26–30, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 46% 34% 1%[e] 19%
Strategies 360/Smart and Safe Arizona[A] September 24–29, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 57% 38% 5%
Monmouth University September 11–15, 2020 420 (RV) ± 4.8% 51% 41% 3%[f] 6%
Strategies 360/Smart and Safe Arizona[1][B] Early August, 2020 – (V)[g] 57% 37% 6%
HighGround Inc. May 18–22, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 66% 25% 9%[h]
On whether recreational marijuana should be legal
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Yes No Other Undecided
OH Predictive Insights September 8–10, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 45% 44% 0%[i] 9%
OH Predictive Insights July 6–7, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 62% 32% No voters[j] 6%
OH Predictive Insights December 3–4, 2019 628 (LV) ± 3.91% 51% 42% 7%
OH Predictive Insights October 31 – November 8, 2019 900 (RV) ± 3.27% 54% 33% 13%
OH Predictive Insights August 13–14, 2019 600 (LV) ± 4% 50% 40% 10%
OH Predictive Insights February 12–13, 2019 600 (LV) ± 4% 52% 41% 7%


Proposition 208

Proposition 208, the Invest in Education Act, is to impose a 3.5% income tax surcharge on high earners and invest the revenue generated in education.[12]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
For Proposition 208 Against Proposition 208 Other Undecided
Patinkin Research Strategies October 21–24, 2020 729 (LV) ± 3.6% 55% 40% 5%
Monmouth University October 11–13, 2020 502 (RV) ± 4.4% 60% 34% 1%[k] 5%
OH Predictive Insights October 4–8, 2020 608 (LV) ± 3.97% 55% 39% 0%[l] 6%
Data Orbital October 3–5, 2020 550 (LV) ± 4.18% 51% 37% 12%
HighGround Inc. September 28 – October 5, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 56% 38% 6%[m]
Patinkin Research Strategies October 1–3, 2020 604 (LV) ± 3.8% 55% 37% 9%
Suffolk University/USA Today September 26–30, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 47% 37% 1%[n] 15%
Monmouth University September 11–15, 2020 420 (RV) ± 4.8% 66% 21% 1%[o] 7%

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ "Refused" with 0%
  3. ^ Would not vote with 0%
  4. ^ "Refused" with 1%
  5. ^ "Refused" with 1%
  6. ^ Would not vote with 3%
  7. ^ Not yet released
  8. ^ Includes "Refused"
  9. ^ "Refused" with 0%
  10. ^ "Refused" with no voters
  11. ^ Would not vote with 1%
  12. ^ "Refused" with 0%
  13. ^ Includes "Refused"
  14. ^ "Refused" with 1%
  15. ^ Would not vote with 1%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Smart and Safe Arizona endorsed Proposition 207 prior to this poll's sampling period
  2. ^ Smart and Safe Arizona endorsed Proposition 207 prior to this poll's sampling period

References

  1. ^ Lily Hay Newman (August 27, 2020), "How to Vote by Mail and Make Sure It Counts", Wired.com, archived from the original on October 6, 2020
  2. ^ Sanchez, Yvonne Wingett; Hansen, Ronald J. (December 18, 2018). "Martha McSally will be appointed to John McCain's Senate seat". Arizona Republic. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  3. ^ https://azcapitoltimes.com/news/2019/07/02/ties-run-deep-many-between-aps-and-republican-candidates-for-utility-regulator/
  4. ^ GOP write-in candidates face steep challenges in Corp Comm campaign
  5. ^ Successful write-in candidate for Corporation Commission gives Republicans a full slate for November
  6. ^ https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/arizona/2020/04/30/judge-removes-boyd-dunn-arizona-corporation-commission-ballot/3062321001/
  7. ^ https://tucson.com/business/2-republican-candidates-lose-bids-to-qualify-for-arizona-corp-comm-ballot/article_bad45476-2708-5704-8ff3-4fa8537d08b1.html
  8. ^ https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/politics/arizona/2020/05/14/another-corporation-commission-candidate-kim-owens-bumped-from-state-ballot/5196276002/
  9. ^ "State of Arizona - Official Canvass - 2020 General Election" (PDF). Arizona Secretary of State. November 30, 2020. Retrieved December 23, 2020.
  10. ^ "PROPOSITION 207 - SAMPLE BALLOT/BALLOT FORMAT" (PDF). Arizona Secretary of State. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  11. ^ Michael Lucie (July 21, 2020), Support for marijuana legalization jumps among voters in Arizona poll, Glendale, Arizona: KTAR-FM
  12. ^ "ARIZONA: DEMS AHEAD FOR PREZ, SENATE". Monmouth University. September 17, 2020. Retrieved September 17, 2020.
  13. ^ "Covered Areas for Voting Rights Bilingual Election Materials—2015", Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, Federal Register, retrieved October 13, 2020, A Notice by the Census Bureau on 12/05/2016

Further reading

External links

Official campaign websites for Corporation Commission
This page was last edited on 2 January 2021, at 23:44
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