To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 9 Tennessee seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 7 2
Seats won 7 2
Seat change Steady Steady

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Tennessee was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Tennessee, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

District 1

The 1st district is based in northeast Tennessee, encompassing all of Carter, Cocke, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Hawkins, Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi, and Washington counties and parts of Jefferson and Sevier counties, and includes the Tri-Cities region. The incumbent is Republican Phil Roe, who was re-elected with 77.1% of the vote in 2018.[1] On January 3, 2020, Roe announced he was retiring from Congress and will not run for a seventh term.[2] His successor will be only the ninth person (not counting caretakers) to represent the district since 1921.

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
Declined

Endorsements

Diana Harshbarger
U.S. Presidents
Steve Darden
Local officials
Timothy Hill
Federal officials
State officials
Local officials
Organizations

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Rusty
Crowe
Steve
Darden
Josh
Gapp
Diana
Harshbarger
David
Hawk
Timothy
Hill
Other Undecided
Spry Strategies/WJHL 11 July 28–30, 2020 665 (LV) ± 4.5% 16% 9% 12% 16% 6% 10% 17%[b] 14%
Spry Strategies/WJHL 11 June 21–24, 2020 800 (LV) ± 4% 14% 6% 6% 22% 6% 11% 13%[c] 21%

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Diana Harshbarger 18,074 19.2
Republican Timothy Hill 15,731 16.7
Republican Rusty Crowe 15,179 16.1
Republican Josh Gapp 13,379 14.2
Republican Steve Darden 11,647 12.4
Republican John Clark 8,826 9.4
Republican David B. Hawk 4,717 5.0
Republican Nicole Williams 2,803 3.0
Republican Jay Adkins 1,635 1.7
Republican Carter M. Quillen 853 0.9
Republican Richard Baker 298 0.3
Republican Chad Fleenor 282 0.3
Republican Phil Arlinghaus 274 0.3
Republican Robert D. Franklin 229 0.2
Republican Chuck Miller 189 0.2
Republican Chance Cansler 147 0.2
Total votes 94,263 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Blair Walsingham, U.S. Air Force veteran[24]
Withdrawn
  • Larry Smith, history professor[25]
  • Chris Rowe, U.S. Army veteran[26] (Endorsed Walsingham)

Endorsements

Blair Walsingham
Individuals
Organizations
Political Parties
  • Humanity First Party[30]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Blair Walsingham 6,076 52.7
Democratic Chris Rowe 3,869 33.6
Democratic Larry Smith 1,572 13.7
Democratic Anthony Rock (write-in) 3 0.0
Total votes 11,520 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[32] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[33] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[34] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[35] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[36] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[38] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 1st congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Diana Harshbarger 227,838 74.8
Democratic Blair Walsingham 68,211 22.4
Independent Steve Holder 8,602 2.8
Total votes 100.0

District 2

The 2nd district is located in eastern Tennessee, anchored by Knoxville. The incumbent is Republican Tim Burchett, who was elected with 65.9% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Burchett (incumbent) 78,990 100.0
Total votes 78,990 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Chance Brown, data engineer[40]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Renee Hoyos 30,287 87.1
Democratic Chance Brown 4,479 12.9
Total votes 34,766 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[41] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[42] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[43] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[44] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[45] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[46] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

{{Election box candidate with party link no change
Tennessee's 2nd congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Burchett (incumbent) 238,447 67.7
Democratic Renee Hoyos 109,298 31
candidate = Matthew Campbell party = Independent votes = 4,574 percentage = 1.3
Total votes 352,319 100.0

District 3

The 3rd district encompasses most of the Chattanooga metro in eastern Tennessee, along with several suburban and rural areas near Knoxville and the Tri-Cities. The incumbent is Republican Chuck Fleischmann, who was re-elected with 63.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Fleischmann (incumbent) 69,890 100.0
Total votes 69,890 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Meg Gorman 28,578 100.0
Total votes 28,578 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[48] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[49] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[50] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[51] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[52] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[53] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 3rd congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chuck Fleischmann (incumbent)
Democratic Meg Gorman
Independent Amber Hysell
Independent Nancy Baxley
Total votes 100.0

District 4

The 4th district encompasses the southern part of Middle Tennessee, including Murfreesboro and Lynchburg. The incumbent is Republican Scott DesJarlais, who was re-elected with 63.4% of the vote in 2018.

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott DesJarlais (incumbent) 55,194 71.0
Republican Doug Meyer 14,184 18.3
Republican Randy Sharp 8,298 10.7
Republican Andrew Kingsolver (write-in) 2 0.0
Total votes 77,678 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Lydia Noelle Bivens, development consultant[56]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Christopher Hale 16,152 58.9
Democratic Noelle Bivens 11,249 41.1
Total votes 27,401 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[57] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[58] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[59] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[60] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[61] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[62] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 4th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott DesJarlais (incumbent)
Democratic Christopher Hale
Total votes 100.0

District 5

The 5th district is centered on Nashville and the immediate surrounding suburbs. The incumbent is Democrat Jim Cooper, who was re-elected with 67.8% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary
  • Keeda Haynes, public defender[65][64]
  • Joshua Rawlings, former Republican candidate for Tennessee House of Representatives in 2014[66][64]

Endorsements

Jim Cooper
Organizations
Keeda Haynes
State officials
Organizations
Individuals
Justin Jones (withdrawn)
Organizations
Meredith Mattlin (withdrawn)
Organizations

[79][80]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Cooper (incumbent) 50,752 57.1
Democratic Keeda Haynes 35,472 39.9
Democratic Joshua Rawlings 2,681 3.0
Total votes 88,905 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[81] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[82] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[83] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[84] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[85] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[86] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 5th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Cooper (incumbent)
Total votes 100.0

District 6

The 6th district takes in the eastern suburbs of Nashville and the northern part of Middle Tennessee, including Hendersonville and Lebanon. The incumbent is Republican John Rose, who was elected with 69.5% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Rose (incumbent) 78,340 100.0
Total votes 78,340 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
  • Christopher Finley, restaurant owner[47]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Christopher Finley 21,375 100.0
Total votes 21,375 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[87] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[88] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[89] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[90] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[91] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[92] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 6th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Rose (incumbent)
Democratic Christopher Finley
Total votes 100.0

District 7

The 7th district encompasses the southern suburbs of Nashville and western rural areas of Middle Tennessee. The incumbent is Republican Mark Green, who was elected with 66.9% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Endorsements

Mark Green
Organizations
  • Combat Veterans for Congress[94]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Green (incumbent) 73,540 100.0
Total votes 73,540 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

  • Kiran Sreepada, public policy consultant[95]

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kiran Sreepada 23,390 100.0
Total votes 23,390 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[96] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[97] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[98] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[99] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[100] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[101] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 7th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mark Green (incumbent)
Democratic Kiran Sreepada
Independent Ronald Brown
Independent Scott Vieira
Total votes 100.0

District 8

The 8th district encompasses rural West Tennessee as well as taking in the eastern suburbs of Memphis, including Bartlett, Lakeland, Germantown, and Collierville. The incumbent is Republican David Kustoff, who was re-elected with 67.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Kustoff (incumbent) 70,677 100.0
Total votes 70,677 100.0

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

  • Erika Stotts Pearson, former teacher and nominee for Tennessee's 8th congressional district in 2018[102]

Eliminated in primary

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Erika Stotts Pearson 14,510 51.1
Democratic Savannah Williamson 5,788 20.4
Democratic Lawrence Pivnick 4,685 16.5
Democratic Hollis Skinner 3,389 12.0
Total votes 28,372 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[105] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[106] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[107] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[108] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[109] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[110] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 8th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Kustoff (incumbent)
Democratic Erika Stotts Pearson
Independent Jon Dillard
Independent James L. Hart
Total votes 100.0

District 9

The 9th district is based in Memphis. The incumbent is Democrat Steve Cohen, who was re-elected with 80.0% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee
Eliminated in primary

Endorsements

Steve Cohen
Organizations
Corey Strong
Organizations

Primary results

Democratic primary results[31]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Cohen (incumbent) 56,312 84.0
Democratic Corey Strong 9,994 14.9
Democratic Leo Awgowhat 768 1.1
Total votes 67,074 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

  • Charlotte Bergmann, businesswoman and nominee for Tennessee's 9th congressional district in 2018[103]

Primary results

Republican primary results[23]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charlotte Bergmann 12,160 100.0
Total votes 12,160 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[115] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[116] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[117] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[118] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[119] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[37] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[120] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results

Tennessee's 9th congressional district, 2020
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steve Cohen (incumbent)
Republican Charlotte Bergmann
Independent Dennis Clark
Independent Bobby Lyons
Total votes 100.0

Notes

  1. ^ Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ Clark with 9%; "another candidate" with 8%
  3. ^ Clark with 5%; Adkins with 3%; Williams with 2%; "another candidate" with 3%
Partisan clients

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  2. ^ Pathé, Simone (January 3, 2020). "Tennessee's Phil Roe won't run for reelection in 2020". Roll Call. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Tennessee Republican US Rep. Phil Roe says he will retire". AP News. January 3, 2020. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  4. ^ Keeling, Jeff (March 12, 2020). "'Trump conservative': Kingsport pharmacist announces Congressional run". WJHL. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Qualified candidates for US House of Representatives" (PDF). sos.tn.gov.
  6. ^ Whetstone, Tyler (March 6, 2020). "Former Johnson City Mayor Steve Darden announces run for Phil Roe's congressional seat". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Allison, Natalie (January 3, 2020). "Who's getting in the mad dash for U.S. Rep. Phil Roe's seat? Here's a list". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  8. ^ Keeling, Jeff (January 6, 2020). "State Senator Rusty Crowe considering run for Congress". WJHL. Retrieved January 7, 2020.
  9. ^ a b Whetstone, Tyler (January 11, 2020). "Guard pilot Ashley Nickloes, Sen. Crowe debating following U.S. Rep. Phil Roe". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  10. ^ Houk, Robert (February 7, 2020). "Sen. Rusty Crowe says he's running for Congress". Johnson City Press. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  11. ^ Keeling, Jeff (January 3, 2020). "Race to replace Roe: Two in, four confirmed "pondering," more expected". WJHL. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  12. ^ https://www.joshgapp.com/
  13. ^ Keeling, Jeff (March 24, 2020). "State Rep. Timothy Hill enters Congressional race". WJHL. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  14. ^ Greiss, Leif (January 3, 2020). "Roe's retirement will open up seat for first time in more than decade". Bristol Herald Courier. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  15. ^ Elliott, Stephen (January 8, 2020). "East Tennessee congressional race taking shape". Nashville Post. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  16. ^ Teague, Slater (January 7, 2020). "State Sen. Jon Lundberg announces he will not seek Roe's U.S. House seat". WJHL. Retrieved January 7, 2020.
  17. ^ https://www.heraldcourier.com/townnews/politics/your-view-former-mayor-endorses-steve-darden-for-congress/article_5904a69a-a8e5-11ea-849d-53256fce6f32.html
  18. ^ https://www.wjhl.com/news/your-local-election-hq/former-u-s-senator-endorses-timothy-hill-for-congress/
  19. ^ https://www.timothyhillforcongress.com/rep-rick-eldridge-endorses-timothy-hill-for-congress/
  20. ^ https://www.timothyhillforcongress.com/johnson-county-mayor-mike-taylor-endorses-timothy-hill-for-congress/
  21. ^ https://www.clubforgrowth.org/club-for-growth-pac-endorses-timothy-hill-tn-01/
  22. ^ http://onthehill.tnjournal.net/house-freedom-caucus-endorses-hill-in-1st-district/
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h "State of Tennessee - August 6, 2020 Republican Primary" (PDF). Tennessee Secretary of State.
  24. ^ Whetstone, Tyler (February 26, 2020). "Longtime State Sen. Rusty Crowe makes it official: He's running for Congress, Roe's seat". Knoxville News Sentinel. Retrieved March 1, 2020.
  25. ^ "Larry Smith for Congress—Tennessee First Congressional District". www.facebook.com.
  26. ^ Elliott, Stephen (January 15, 2019). "Democrat files to run in 1st Congressional District". Nashville Post. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  27. ^ a b c d e https://blairforcongress.com/events
  28. ^ https://enewschannels.com/andrew-yang-and-humanity-forward-endorse-blair-walsingham-for-us-house-of-representatives-tn-district-1/
  29. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pat1zU11hKc
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i https://blairforcongress.com/endorsements
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i "State of Tennessee - August 6, 2020 Democratic Primary" (PDF). Tennessee Secretary of State.
  32. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  33. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  34. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  35. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  36. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Battle for White House". RCP. April 19, 2019.
  38. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  39. ^ "It's official. I'm running for Congress in Tennessee". February 25, 2020. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  40. ^ Vines, Georgiana (July 26, 2020). "Hoyos is raising more money than Burchett, but can it make a difference?". Knox News. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  41. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  42. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  43. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  44. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  45. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  46. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  47. ^ a b Humphrey, Scott (July 17, 2020). "A LOOK AT WHO IS ON THE BALLOT IN CUMBERLAND AND ROANE COUNTY FOR AUGUST 6, 2020 ELECTION". 1057 News. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  48. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  49. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  50. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  51. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  52. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  53. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  54. ^ a b Sher, Andy (July 15, 2020). "Tennessee congressional candidate threatened after calling Grundy County a 'hotbed of white supremacy'". Chattanooga Times Free Press. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  55. ^ Ebert, Joel (April 10, 2020). "See who's running for statewide, federal and legislative offices in Tennessee in 2020". The Tennessean. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  56. ^ "Noelle Bivens, Christopher J. Hale square off in a virtual town hall-style debate". Murfreesboro Voice. July 8, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  57. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  58. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  59. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  60. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  61. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  62. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  63. ^ Garrison, Joey (December 18, 2018). "Nashville U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper to run for re-election in 2020". The Tennessean. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  64. ^ a b c Ebert, Joel (April 10, 2020). "See who's running for statewide, federal and legislative offices in Tennessee in 2020". The Tennessean. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  65. ^ Elliott, Stephen (January 6, 2020). "Another Democrat Is Challenging Jim Cooper". Nashville Scene. Retrieved January 6, 2020.
  66. ^ Elliott, Stephen (January 6, 2020). "Another Democrat Is Challenging Jim Cooper". Nashville Scene. In addition to Haynes, Cooper is facing local activist Justin Jones in the primary, as well as Meredith Mattlin, a Democratic socialist, and Joshua Rawlings, formerly a Republican.
  67. ^ a b https://www.cooperforcongress.com/endorsements
  68. ^ a b Society, Humane. "2020 Endorsements". Humane Society Legislative Fund.
  69. ^ a b "2020 Endorsements". www.plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  70. ^ a b "Sierra Club #ClimateVoter Guide: Endorsements". Sierra Club.
  71. ^ Elliott, Stephen (June 23, 2020). "Brenda Gilmore Backs Keeda Haynes in Congressional Race". Nashville Scene.
  72. ^ https://blueamerica.crooksandliars.com/2020/05/31/blue-america-endorsement-nashville-needs-a-political-change/
  73. ^ "2020 Endorsed House Candidates". DUH! Demand Universal Healthcare. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  74. ^ Simpson, Yvette (May 13, 2020). "Democracy for America : Democracy for America endorses Keeda Haynes for Congress in TN-5". www.democracyforamerica.com. Democracy for America.
  75. ^ Palmer, Kenny (June 14, 2020). "INDIVISIBLE ANNOUNCES NEXT WAVE OF CONGRESSIONAL ENDORSEMENTS". Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  76. ^ Elliott, Stephen (July 1, 2020). "Another progressive group endorses Cooper challenger". Nashville Post.
  77. ^ https://www.nashvillepost.com/politics/elections/article/21135218/former-presidential-candidate-endorses-cooper-challenger
  78. ^ Elliot, Stephen (November 21, 2019). "Gore's progressive primary support stops at Cooper". Nashville Post. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  79. ^ "Alumni | Rose Caucus | Non-Profit Organization | United States". Rose Caucus. Retrieved October 14, 2020.
  80. ^ "Vanderbilt Young Democratic Socialists of America". www.facebook.com. Retrieved October 14, 2020.
  81. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  82. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  83. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  84. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  85. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  86. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  87. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  88. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  89. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  90. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  91. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  92. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  93. ^ Ebert, Joel; Allison, Natalie (July 11, 2019). "US Rep. Mark Green says he won't run for US Senate in 2020". The Tennessean. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
  94. ^ "Combat Veterans For Congress | Electing Fiscal Conservatives". www.combatveteransforcongress.org.
  95. ^ Elliott, Stephen. "Mark Green challenger promises positive campaign". Nashville Post. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  96. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  97. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  98. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  99. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  100. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  101. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  102. ^ Edwards, Breanna (July 24, 2020). "Erika Stotts Pearson Takes On Tennessee's 8th Congressional District Once Again". Essence. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  103. ^ a b c d Wright, Winnie (July 20, 2020). "Early voting is underway in Memphis: What seats are up for grabs and who is running?". FOX 13. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  104. ^ "Hollis Skinner to announce candidacy for Congress". ABC WBBJ 7 News. June 20, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  105. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  106. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  107. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  108. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  109. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  110. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  111. ^ Burgess, Katherine (January 1, 2019). "Cohen to seek re-election to Congress in 2020 and 2022". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  112. ^ Hardiman, Samuel (August 2, 2019). "Corey Strong announces primary challenge to US Rep. Steve Cohen". Memphis Commercial Appeal. Retrieved August 5, 2019.
  113. ^ https://centeractionfund.org/2020-endorsements/#TN
  114. ^ "Corey Strong". Brand New Congress. December 23, 2019.
  115. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  116. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  117. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  118. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  119. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  120. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.

External links

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 9th district candidates
This page was last edited on 13 November 2020, at 03:34
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.