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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 2 Maine seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 2 0
Seats won 2 0
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 468,978 340,236
Percentage 57.95% 42.04%
Swing Increase 2.83% Increase 1.92%

United States House of Representatives elections in Maine, 2020 results by district.svg

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maine was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the two U.S. Representatives from the state of Maine, one from each of the state's two congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The election was conducted with ranked choice voting, as per the result of a referendum passed in 2016.

Party Primaries were initially scheduled to take place on June 9, 2020. They were rescheduled by Gov. Janet Mills to July 14, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Mills' executive order also expanded the ability to request absentee ballots, which may now be done up to and on election day.[1] Parties currently qualified to participate in the 2020 Primary Election are the Democratic Party, the Green Independent Party, and the Republican Party. Two candidates in District 1 and four candidates in district 2 filed petitions with the Secretary of State by March 16, 2020.[2] Non-party candidates could also file petitions to be included on the ballot by June 1, 2020.[3]

District 1

2020 Maine's 1st congressional district election

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →
 
Chellie Pingree official photo.jpg
Nominee Chellie Pingree Jay Allen
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 271,004 165,008
Percentage 62.2% 37.8%

U.S. Representative before election

Chellie Pingree
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Chellie Pingree
Democratic

The 1st district encompasses the southern coastal area of the state, taking in Portland, Augusta, Brunswick and Saco. The incumbent is Democrat Chellie Pingree, who was re-elected with 58.8% of the vote in 2018.[4]

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Primary results

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chellie Pingree (incumbent) 102,773 100.0
Total votes 102,773 100.0

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared
  • Jay Allen, physician[6]

Primary results

Republican primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jay Allen 31,124 100.0
Total votes 31,124 100.0

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Safe D October 2, 2020
Inside Elections[8] Safe D October 1, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[9] Safe D October 1, 2020
Politico[10] Safe D September 8, 2020
Daily Kos[11] Safe D September 25, 2020
RCP[12] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[13] Safe D July 26, 2020

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Chellie
Pingree (D)
Jay
Allen (R)
Other/
Undecided
Colby College October 21–25, 2020 426 (LV) 58% 31% 11%[b]
Pan Atlantic Research October 2–6, 2020 300 (LV) ± 6.4% 54% 35% 11%[b]
Critical Insights September 25 – October 4, 2020 232 (LV) 58% 24% 18%[c]
Critical Insights July 28 – August 10, 2020 234 (LV) 50% 22% 27%[d]

Results

Maine's 1st congressional district, 2020[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chellie Pingree (incumbent) 271,004 62.2
Republican Jay Allen 165,008 37.8
Write-in 15 0.0
Total votes 436,027 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2

2020 Maine's 2nd congressional district election

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →
 
Rep. Jared Golden, official portrait, 116th congress.jpg
Nominee Jared Golden Dale Crafts
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 197,974 175,228
Percentage 53.0% 47.0%

U.S. Representative before election

Jared Golden
Democratic

Elected U.S. Representative

Jared Golden
Democratic

The 2nd district covers most of northern rural Maine, including the cities of Lewiston, Bangor, Auburn and Presque Isle. The incumbent is Democrat Jared Golden, who flipped the district and was elected with 50.6% of the vote in 2018,[4] making him the first member of Congress to be elected by ranked choice voting.[15] Donald Trump won the district in the concurrent presidential election.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Endorsements

Primary results

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jared Golden (incumbent) 57,718 100.0
Total votes 57,718 100.0

Republican primary

On the ballot

Declined

Endorsements

Adrienne Bennett
Federal officials
Organizations
Eric Brakey
Federal officials
State officials
  • Paul Davis, state senator and former state representative (2008-2014), state Senate minority leader (2004-2006), and state senator (1998-2006) (co-endorsed with Dale Crofts)[35]
Organizations
Dale Crafts
Federal officials
U.S. Governors
State officials
  • Bernard Ayotte, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Kevin Battle, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Robert Berube, former state representative (2002-2008)[43]
  • Russell Black, state senator and former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • David C. Burns, former state senator (2012-2016)[44]
  • Richard Cebra, state representative and former Maine Republican Party chair (2012-2013) and state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Patrick Corey, state representative[44]
  • Dean Cray, former state representative (2008-2014)[44]
  • Andre Cushing III, former state senator (2012-2018), state Senate assistant majority leader, and state representative (2008-2012)[43]
  • Scott Cyrway, state senator[43]
  • Douglas Damon, former state representative (2010-2012)[45]
  • Paul Davis, state senator and former state representative (2008-2014), state senator (2002-2006), and state Senate minority leader (2004-2006) (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Peter Doak, former state representative (2012-2014)[45]
  • Dana Dow, state senator and state Senate minority leader[43]
  • Gary Drinkwater, state representative[44]
  • Bradlee Farrin, state senator and former state representative (2014-2018)[45]
  • Jeffery Gifford, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Randall Greenwood, former state representative (2014-2016)[46]
  • James Hamper, state senator and former state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Jeffery Hanley, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Gary Hilliard, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Brian Hobart, former state representative (2014-2016)[43]
  • Peter Johnson, former state representative (2008-2014)[43]
  • L. Gary Knight, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Ricky Long, former state representative (2010-2016)[43]
  • Tom Martin, state representative and former state senator (2010-2012)[43]
  • Garrett Mason, former state senator (2010-2018) and state Senate majority leader[43]
  • Rick Mason, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[44]
  • Michael McClellan, former state representative (2010-2016)[43]
  • Susan Morissette, former state representative (2010-2012)[43]
  • Joshua Morris, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Allen Nadeau, former state representative (2012-2014)[43]
  • Melvin Newendyke, former state representative (2010-2014)[43]
  • John Picchiotti, former state representative (2010-2012, 2014-2018)[43]
  • Richard Pickett, state representative[43]
  • Jeffrey Pierce, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Debra Plowman, acting Education Commissioner (2016), Republican candidate in 2012 U.S. Senate race, and former state senator (2004-2012) and state Senate assistant majority leader and state representative (1992-2000)[43]
  • Gary Plummer, former state senator (2012-2014) and state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Matthew Pouliot, state senator and former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Kerri Prescott, former state representative (2006-2012)[43]
  • Deborah Sanderson, state representative[43]
  • Jeffrey Timberlake, state senator and former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • Michael Timmons, former state representative (2014-2016)[43]
  • William Tuell, state representative[43]
  • Charlie Webster, former Maine Republican Party chair (2008-2012), 1994 Republican gubernatorial candidate, and former state senator (1984-1994), state Senate minority leader (1988-1992), state Senate assistant minority leader (1986-1988), and state representative (1980-1984)[43]
  • Stephen Wood, former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • David Woodsome, state senator[43]
Newspapers
Organizations
Individuals
  • Shawn Moody, businessman, 2018 Republican gubernatorial nominee, and 2010 independent gubernatorial candidate[51]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Adrienne
Bennett
Eric
Brakey
Dale
Crafts
Undecided
SurveyUSA June 30 – July 6, 2020 604 (LV) ± 4.1% 25%[e] 19% 37% 19%
31%[f] 45% 34%
We Ask America June 16–17, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 28% 22% 20% 29%

Primary results

Both Bennett and Brakey conceded the race to Crafts the day after the primary. As Crafts did not get 50% of the vote, Maine's ranked choice system calls for the second choices of the last place candidate's votes to be distributed to the other candidates, whether or not the candidates concede the race. Crafts criticized this as a waste of taxpayer dollars, and both Bennett and Brakey said they would refuse to accept the results of the ranked choice tabulation. Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap said whether the concessions could stop the tabulation was "a question for lawyers", but that the tabulation would begin on July 18. Crafts called on the Maine Legislature to examine this issue. Dunlap's office, while not responding directly to Crafts' call to action on the Legislature, did agree with Crafts that Dunlap was performing his duty under the law. [52]

Republican primary results[53]
Party Candidate Round 1 Round 2
Votes % Transfer Votes % (gross) % (net)
Republican Dale Crafts 23,665 45.0% +3,551 28,019 53.3% 58.0%
Republican Adrienne Bennett 16,920 32.2% +3,375 20,295 38.6% 42.0%
Republican Eric Brakey 11,976 22.8% -11,976 Eliminated
Total active votes 52,561 48,314 100.0%
Exhausted ballots +3,252 4190 8.0%
Total votes 52,561 100.0% 52,561 100.0%

% (gross) = percent of all valid votes cast (without eliminating the exhausted votes)
% (net) = percent of votes cast after eliminating the exhausted votes

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[7] Likely D October 2, 2020
Inside Elections[8] Safe D October 16, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[9] Likely D October 1, 2020
Politico[10] Lean D October 11, 2020
Daily Kos[11] Likely D October 29, 2020
RCP[12] Lean D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[13] Lean D July 26, 2020

Endorsements

Dale Crafts (R)
Federal officials
State officials
  • Bernard Ayotte, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Kevin Battle, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Robert Berube, former state representative (2002-2008)[43]
  • Russell Black, state senator and former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • David C. Burns, former state senator (2012-2016)[44]
  • Richard Cebra, state representative and former Maine Republican Party chair (2012-2013) and state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Patrick Corey, state representative[44]
  • Dean Cray, former state representative (2008-2014)[44]
  • Andre Cushing III, former state senator (2012-2018), state Senate assistant majority leader, and state representative (2008-2012)[43]
  • Scott Cyrway, state senator[43]
  • Douglas Damon, former state representative (2010-2012)[45]
  • Paul Davis, state senator and former state representative (2008-2014), state senator (2002-2006), and state Senate minority leader (2004-2006) (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Peter Doak, former state representative (2012-2014)[45]
  • Dana Dow, state senator and state Senate minority leader[43]
  • Gary Drinkwater, state representative[44]
  • Bradlee Farrin, state senator and former state representative (2014-2018)[45]
  • Jeffery Gifford, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Randall Greenwood, former state representative (2014-2016)[46]
  • James Hamper, state senator and former state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Jeffery Hanley, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Gary Hilliard, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Brian Hobart, former state representative (2014-2016)[43]
  • Peter Johnson, former state representative (2008-2014)[43]
  • L. Gary Knight, former state representative (2006-2014)[43]
  • Paul LePage, 2022 Republican gubernatorial candidate and former Governor (2011-2019)[41]
  • Ricky Long, former state representative (2010-2016)[43]
  • Tom Martin, state representative and former state senator (2010-2012)[43]
  • Garrett Mason, former state senator (2010-2018) and state Senate majority leader[43]
  • Rick Mason, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[44]
  • Michael McClellan, former state representative (2010-2016)[43]
  • Susan Morissette, former state representative (2010-2012)[43]
  • Joshua Morris, state representative (co-endorsed with Eric Brakey)[43]
  • Allen Nadeau, former state representative (2012-2014)[43]
  • Melvin Newendyke, former state representative (2010-2014)[43]
  • John Picchiotti, former state representative (2010-2012, 2014-2018)[43]
  • Richard Pickett, state representative[43]
  • Jeffrey Pierce, former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Debra Plowman, acting Education Commissioner (2016), Republican candidate in 2012 U.S. Senate race, and former state senator (2004-2012) and state Senate assistant majority leader and state representative (1992-2000)[43]
  • Gary Plummer, former state senator (2012-2014) and state representative (2004-2012)[43]
  • Matthew Pouliot, state senator and former state representative (2014-2018)[43]
  • Kerri Prescott, former state representative (2006-2012)[43]
  • Deborah Sanderson, state representative[43]
  • Jeffrey Timberlake, state senator and former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • Michael Timmons, former state representative (2014-2016)[43]
  • William Tuell, state representative[43]
  • Charlie Webster, former Maine Republican Party chair (2008-2012), 1994 Republican gubernatorial candidate, and former state senator (1984-1994), state Senate minority leader (1988-1992), state Senate assistant minority leader (1986-1988), and state representative (1980-1984)[43]
  • Stephen Wood, former state representative (2010-2018)[44]
  • David Woodsome, state senator[43]
Newspapers
Organizations
Individuals
  • Shawn Moody, businessman, 2018 Republican gubernatorial nominee, and 2010 independent gubernatorial candidate[51]
Declined to endorse

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jared
Golden (D)
Dale
Crafts (R)
Other/
Undecided
Change Research October 29 – November 2, 2020 475 (LV) ± 4.6% 53% 44% 3%[g]
Colby College October 21–25, 2020 453 (LV) 56% 31% 13%[h]
Pan Atlantic Research October 2–6, 2020 300 (LV) ± 6.4% 60% 33% 7%[i]
Critical Insights September 25 – October 4, 2020 234 (LV) 52% 34% 14%[j]
Colby College September 17–23, 2020 275 (LV) 56% 33% 11%[b]
Siena College/NYT Upshot September 11–16, 2020 440 (LV) 56%[k] 37% 6%[l]
Fabrizio Ward/Hart Research Associates[A] August 30 – September 5, 2020 367 (LV) 53% 40% 7%[m]
Wick Surveys (D)[B] August 25–28, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 50% 44% 6%[n]
Critical Insights July 28 – August 10, 2020 218 (LV) 46% 36% 18%[o]
Colby College/SocialSphere July 18–24, 2020 888 (LV) ± 3.9% 45% 33% 22%[p]
Hypothetical polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican (R)
Jared
Golden (D)
Undecided
Colby College/SocialSphere February 10–13, 2020 493 (LV) 29% 43% 28%

Results

Maine's 2nd congressional district, 2020[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jared Golden (incumbent) 197,974 53.0
Republican Dale Crafts 175,228 47.0
Write-in 33 0.0
Total votes 373,235 100.0
Democratic hold

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ a b c Undecided with 11%
  3. ^ "Someone else" with 3%; "Refused" with 2%; would not vote with 1%; Undecided with 12%
  4. ^ "Someone else" with 4%; "Prefer not to say" with 1%; woud not vote with no voters; Undecided with 22%
  5. ^ Standard IV response
  6. ^ With ranked choice voting
  7. ^ Would not vote with 1%; "Don't recall and Did not vote with 0%; Undecided with 2%
  8. ^ Undecided with 13%
  9. ^ Undecided with 7%
  10. ^ "Someone else" with 2%; "Refused" with 1%; would not vote with 0%; Undecided with 11%
  11. ^ Topline after Ranked Choice Voting is used
  12. ^ "Someone else" and would not vote with 0%; "Undecided/Refused" with 6%
  13. ^ Would not vote with 0%; Undecided with 7%
  14. ^ Undecided with 6%
  15. ^ "Someone else" with 1%; would not vote with 0%; "Prefer not to say" with no voters; Undecided with 16%
  16. ^ "One of the minor party candidates" with 5%; Undecided with 17%
Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll sponsored by AARP.
  2. ^ Poll sponsored by Left of Center PAC, which has endorsed Golden prior to this poll's sampling period.

References

  1. ^ Andrews, Caitlin (December 18, 2019). "Mills officially pushes back June elections to July 14". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 10, 2020.
  2. ^ "Candidates Listing (xls)". www.maine.gov/sos/cec/elec/upcoming/. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  3. ^ "Candidate's Guide" (PDF). www.maine.gov/sos/cec/elec/. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "July 14, 2020 - Primary Election - Non-Ranked Choice Offices". Maine Department Secretary of State. July 21, 2020. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  6. ^ Houk, Evan (August 29, 2019). "New Harbor Man Seeks Republican Nomination for Congress". The Lincoln County News. Retrieved August 29, 2019.
  7. ^ a b "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  8. ^ a b "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  9. ^ a b "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  10. ^ a b "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  12. ^ a b "Battle for White House". RCP. April 19, 2019.
  13. ^ a b "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  14. ^ a b "November 3, 2020 General Election". Maine Department of Secretary of State. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  15. ^ "Ranked-choice voting worked in Maine. Now we should use it in presidential races". USA TODAY. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  16. ^ Collins, Steve [@SteveCollinsSJ] (May 20, 2019). "Not surprising, but @RepGolden said today he is not going to run for US Senate. He said he respects @SenatorCollins & her approach to governing, even if he doesn't always agree with her. Besides, he said, his #ME02 seat is "not a stepping stone" & he plans to stay. #mepolitics" (Tweet). Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Twitter.
  17. ^ "Former GOP Sen. William Cohen backs Democrat Jared Golden in Maine's 2nd District". Bangor Daily News.
  18. ^ a b "Endorsed Candidates". End Citizens United.
  19. ^ a b "JStreetPAC Candidates". JStreetPAC.
  20. ^ a b Sittenfeld, Tiernan (August 15, 2019). "LCV Action Fund Announces Second Round of 2020 Environmental Majority Makers". League of Conservation Voters. LCV Action Fund.
  21. ^ a b Hogue, Ilyse (March 8, 2019). "NARAL Announces First Slate of Frontline Pro-Choice Endorsements for 2020". NARAL Pro-Choice America.
  22. ^ a b "2020 Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  23. ^ a b "Sierra Club #ClimateVoter Guide: Endorsements". Sierra Club.
  24. ^ a b "Candidates". VoteVets.org.
  25. ^ Collins, Steve (October 3, 2019). "Crafts, a former state lawmaker, plans to seek 2nd Congressional District seat". Sun Journal. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  26. ^ Blanchard, Zach (October 8, 2019). "Paul LePage's former press secretary eyes 2nd District U.S. House seat". newscentermaine.com. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  27. ^ Collins, Steve (July 29, 2019). "Maine republicans to hold 'Stop The Madness' rally in defense of Trump". Sun Journal. Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  28. ^ Shepherd, Michael (September 5, 2019). "Paul LePage hints that another Republican will join race to unseat Jared Golden". WGME. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  29. ^ Hoey, Dennis (August 3, 2019). "Bruce Poliquin will not run against Jared Golden in 2020". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  30. ^ https://www.adrienne2020.com/2020/06/25/adrienne-bennett-receives-key-endorsement-from-trump-ally-congresswoman-elise-stefanik/
  31. ^ "E-PAC ENDORSES 2 NEW RISING STAR CANDIDATES, TOUTS NY PRIMARY VICTORIES". June 24, 2020.
  32. ^ https://www.sba-list.org/candidate/adrienne-bennett
  33. ^ https://www.adrienne2020.com/2020/03/05/leading-womens-group-endorses-adrienne-bennett-for-congress/
  34. ^ Staff. "U.S. Senator Rand Paul Endorses Eric Brakey for Congress". ericbrakey.com. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  35. ^ https://ericbrakey.com/email-letters-full-list/20190813-brakey-presser
  36. ^ "Eric Brakey (ME-02)". Club for Growth. Retrieved February 29, 2020.
  37. ^ "Meet the Top Candidates". FreedomWorks for America. Retrieved February 29, 2020.
  38. ^ "Protect Freedom PAC Launches Ad in ME-02 in Support of Eric Brakey". www.protectfreedompac.com.
  39. ^ Writer, Dale Crafts for Congress (October 5, 2020). "Congressman Dan Crenshaw Endorses Dale Crafts for Congress".
  40. ^ a b Russell, Eric (August 2, 2020). "Trump tweets endorsement of Republican Crafts in Maine's 2nd District race".
  41. ^ a b Carriagn, Dan (October 10, 2019). "Another candidate joins Maine's 2nd District race, with big name support". News Center Maine. Retrieved October 14, 2019.
  42. ^ Writer, Dale Crafts for Congress (September 28, 2020). "South Dakota Governor, Kirsti Noem endorses Dale Crafts".
  43. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br "Endorsements".
  44. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Crafts for Congress: Sportsman's Coalition". February 25, 2020.
  45. ^ a b c d e f "VETERANS COALITION - CRAFTS FOR CONGRESS". February 26, 2020.
  46. ^ a b https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oboT7qIlQ5U
  47. ^ a b Board, The BDN Editorial (June 29, 2020). "Dale Crafts is top choice in 2nd District Republican primary". Bangor Daily News.
  48. ^ a b "FRC Action PAC". www.frcaction.org.
  49. ^ "NRA backs Dale Crafts in Maine's 2nd District, but gives Jared Golden solid mark".
  50. ^ Burns, Christopher (September 10, 2020). "Small-business group endorses Dale Crafts in 2nd District race". Bangor Daily News.
  51. ^ a b Collins, Steve (October 11, 2019). "Lisbon's Dale Crafts formally declares candidacy for US House seat".
  52. ^ Mannino, Gabrielle (July 16, 2020). "Crafts says ranked-choice tabulation is 'not necessary' and 'an affront to the taxpayer'". WCSH. Retrieved July 16, 2020.
  53. ^ "Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions, Elections and Voting, Tabulations June 12, 2018". www.maine.gov.
  54. ^ "Dale Crafts holds big lead in Republican congressional primary". Centralmaine.com. Retrieved July 15, 2020.

External links

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
This page was last edited on 28 January 2021, at 19:00
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