To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

2020 United States Senate election in Maine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 United States Senate election in Maine

← 2014 November 3, 2020 2026 →
 
2015 Susan Collins crop.jpg
Nominee Susan Collins Sara Gideon
Party Republican Democratic

Incumbent U.S. senator

Susan Collins
Republican



The 2020 United States Senate election in Maine will be held on November 3, 2020, to elect a member of the United States Senate to represent the State of Maine, concurrently with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the United States Senate, elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Candidates include incumbent Republican Senator Susan Collins, Democratic nominee Sara Gideon,[1] as well as independent candidates Lisa Savage and Max Linn.

Background

Republican Senator Susan Collins is running for a fifth term. Collins has won each election to this seat with a greater victory margin than the one before it. Observers do not anticipate this election to continue that trend.[2][3][4][5] The New York Times's Ideology Tracker considers Collins the most liberal Republican in the U.S. Senate.[6]

Collins was criticized for her decision to vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court, despite allegations of sexual misconduct and abuse against him and his anti-abortion stances (Collins describes herself as pro-choice).[7][8] She also faced criticism for her stance on the impeachment of President Donald Trump. Collins voted in favor of allowing witness testimony in the Senate trial, and was the first Republican to do so,[9] but witness testimony was not allowed, and she voted to acquit Trump on both charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.[10][11][12][13] Collins said that she voted to acquit because "impeachment of a president should be reserved for conduct that poses such a serious threat to our governmental institutions as to warrant the extreme step of immediate removal from office."[14] She initially claimed that Trump "learned a pretty big lesson" from the impeachment,[15] but later said that he had not learned from it after all.[16] During the COVID-19 pandemic, Collins received backlash for arguing against $870 million in pandemic funding in the stimulus bill that came in response to the Great Recession[17][18][clarification needed] She has also been criticized for running for third, fourth, and fifth Senate terms despite vowing to serve no more than two terms during her 1996 campaign.[19][20] Since January 2020, Morning Consult has ranked Collins as the least popular U.S. Senator.[21]

The Democratic nominee, Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives Sara Gideon, supports criminal justice reforms, expansion of the Affordable Care Act, rejoining the Paris Climate Accord, and imposing universal background checks on gun sales to combat gun violence. In 2019, Gideon faced an election ethics complaint for accepting reimbursements for her political donations from her own PAC. Gideon apologized for the violation, reimbursed the federal government a total of $3,250, and closed the PAC.[22]

Lisa Savage, a longtime antiwar activist and schoolteacher from Solon, initially sought the Maine Green Independent Party nomination, but in late February, she announced her intention to instead qualify for the ballot as an independent due to Maine's restrictive ballot access measures.[23][24][25] In April, Savage turned in more than 5,500 signatures to the Secretary of State's office and thus qualified for the general election ballot.

Max Linn, a financial planner and conservative activist from Bar Harbor, is a Trump supporter and former candidate of the Republican and Reform parties. In July 2020, he qualified for the ballot as an independent. Former Republican State Senator Mary Small challenged the signatures on his petition, but the Secretary of State found that he had enough and he was placed on the ballot.[26] Later that month, he announced his intention to drop out of the race to support Collins. But days later, he decided not to drop out unless Collins agreed to a list of policies, which she did not.[27]

Party primaries were initially scheduled to take place on June 9, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the state, Governor Janet Mills rescheduled them for July 14. Mills's executive order also expanded voters' ability to request absentee ballots, which may now be done up to and on election day.[28] The primaries were conducted with ranked choice voting. Parties qualified to participate in the 2020 primary election were the Democratic Party, the Republican Party, and the Maine Green Independent Party.

Democratic primary

On April 20, 2019, attorney and activist Bre Kidman became the first person to announce their candidacy for the Democratic nomination, making them the first ever U.S. Senate candidate who identifies as non-binary.[29][30][31] On June 13, 2019, former Maine gubernatorial candidate Betsy Sweet declared her candidacy.[32] Eleven days later, Maine House Speaker Sara Gideon announced her candidacy, receiving widespread media coverage.[33][34][35][36] A number of other candidates announced their candidacies, including General Jon Treacy and former Google executive and political aide Ross LaJeunesse, who would have been the first openly gay man elected to the Senate. LaJeunesse and Treacy withdrew, with LaJeunesse endorsing Gideon. Two debates were held with all three candidates, while one hosted by WCSH was attended only by Sweet and Kidman.[37][38][39]

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Withdrawn

Declined

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Sara
Gideon
Betsy
Sweet
Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 – (LV)[b] 67% 17% 17%[c]
Colby College/SocialSphere [1] February 10–13, 2020 383 (LV) 60% 8% 33%[d]

Results

Results by county .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;width:1.5em;height:1.5em;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{font-size:95%}  Gideon—70–80%   Gideon—60–70%
Results by county
  Gideon—70–80%
  Gideon—60–70%
Democratic primary results[61]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sara Gideon 116,264 71.47%
Democratic Betsy Sweet 37,327 22.94%
Democratic Bre Kidman 9,090 5.59%
Total votes 162,681 100.0%

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

  • Amy Colter, law office manager (write-in candidate)[63]

Withdrawn

Declined

Polling

Head-to-head matchups

Former candidates
with Susan Collins and Derek Levasseur
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Derek
Levasseur
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 55% 10% 34%
Hypothetical polling
with Susan Collins and Paul LePage
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Paul
LePage
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 29% 63% 8%
with Susan Collins and Shawn Moody
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Shawn
Moody
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 36% 45% 18%
with Susan Collins and generic Republican if Collins supported impeaching Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 35% 55% 10
with Susan Collins and Derek Levasseur if Collins supported impeaching Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Derek
Levasseur
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 37% 24% 39%
with Susan Collins and generic Republican
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins
Generic
Republican
Undecided
Public Policy Polling (D) October 11–13, 2019 271 (LV) ± 6% 53% 38% 9%

Results

Republican primary results[68]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Collins (incumbent) 87,375 98.79%
Republican Amy Colter (write-in) 1,073 1.21%
Total votes 88,448 100.0%

Other candidates

Green Independent Party

Two candidates declared their intentions to run for the Maine Green Independent Party's nomination, but one withdrew and the other left the party to become an independent. Lisa Savage left the party because of Maine's ballot access requirements; Savage needed 2,000 registered party members to sign a nomination petition to appear on the ballot as the Green Party candidate but could only gather them from January 1 until the March 15 deadline. The Green Party had roughly 41,000 members statewide, which was significantly fewer than the Democratic and Republican parties but nonetheless required the same number of signatures. No alternative party candidate for statewide office had been able to meet this requirement since Pat LaMarche did so in 2006 for Governor. Instead, Savage sought to appear as an independent candidate, which required 4,000 signatures, but they may be from any registered voter, not just party members and they could have been gathered until the June deadline.[25]

Withdrawn

  • David Gibson, solar design specialist (endorsed Savage)[69]
  • Lisa Savage, school teacher[70] (switched to independent)[71]

Write-in candidates

Independents

Independent Lisa Savage is a peace activist and retired schoolteacher from Solon, Maine.
Independent Lisa Savage is a peace activist and retired schoolteacher from Solon, Maine.

Eight Independents declared their candidacy for Senate in 2020, including one affiliated with the Libertarian Party of Maine, which lost ballot access after the 2018 elections.[76] Two qualified for positions on the November ballot.[73]

Declared

Withdrawn

  • Joshua Arnone, accounting clerk affiliated with the Libertarian Party of Maine[63][73]
  • Steven Golieb, Millinocket town councilor[77][73]
  • Leigh Hawes, truck driver[78][73]
  • Danielle VanHelsing, LGBTQ rights activist[46][73]
  • Linda Wooten, vocational educator and conservative activist[63][73]

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[79] Tossup August 17, 2020
Inside Elections[80] Tossup September 18, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[81] Lean D (flip) September 21, 2020
Daily Kos[82] Tossup August 31, 2020
Politico[83] Tossup September 9, 2020
RCP[84] Tossup September 17, 2020
Niskanen[85] Likely D (flip) September 15, 2020
DDHQ[86] Lean D (flip) September 16, 2020
538[87] Lean D (flip) September 24, 2020

Debates

The four candidates participated in an in-person debate on September 11, 2020, held without an audience. Collins has proposed holding 16 debates, one for every county in Maine, but such a schedule has not been confirmed.[88]

2020 United States Senate election in Maine debates
  Date Moderator Participants
Key:
 P  Participant.  
Republican Democratic Independent Independent
United States Senator
Susan Collins
Maine House Speaker
Sara Gideon
Financial planner
Max Linn
Public schoolteacher
Lisa Savage
 
1
 
Friday, September 11, 2020
Pat Callaghan
Michael Shepherd
Rachel Ohm
P P P P

Endorsements

Sara Gideon (D)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Vice Presidents
U.S. Senators
Members of U.S. Congress
State executive officials
State legislators
Individuals
  • Stephen King, author[100]
  • Ross LaJeunesse, former aide to George J. Mitchell, Ted Kennedy, Steve Westly and Arnold Schwarzenegger[101]
Organizations
Unions
Susan Collins (R)
U.S. Presidents
U.S. Senators
U.S. Governors
Other Invididuals
Organizations
Lisa Savage (I)
State Executives
State legislators
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Declined to endorse

Polling

Graphical summary

Aggregate polls

Sara Gideon vs. Susan Collins
Source of poll aggregation Dates administered Dates updated Sara Gideon Susan Collins Other/Undecided[e] Margin
270 to Win September 10-25, 2020 September 25, 2020 48.4% 43.0% 8.6% Gideon +5.4
Real Clear Politics September 10-23, 2020 September 25, 2020 48.5% 42.0% 9.5% Gideon +6.5
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Collins (R)
Sara
Gideon (D)
Lisa
Savage (I)
Other /
Undecided
Colby College September 17–23, 2020 847 (LV) ± 3.4% 41% 45% 3% 11%[f]
Moore Information (R)[A] September 20–22, 2020 600 (LV) 42% 42% 9%[g]
Suffolk University September 17–20, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 41%[h] 46% 4% 7%[i]
42%[j] 49% 1% 8%[k]
Siena College/NYT Upshot September 11–16, 2020 663 (LV) ± 5.1% 40%[l] 44% 2% 2%[m]
44%[n] 49% 0% 7%[o]
Quinnipiac University September 10–14, 2020 1,183 (LV) ± 2.9% 42% 54% 4%[p]
Citizen Data September 4–7, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 41% 49% 1% 9%[q]
Fabrizio Ward/Hart Research Associates[B] August 30 – September 5, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 43%[r] 44% 6% 7%[s]
47%[t] 48% 5%[u]
Public Policy Polling August 13–14, 2020 571 (V) ± 4.1% 44% 49% 7%[v]
Critical Insights July 28 – August 9, 2020 499 (LV) ± 4.3% 35% 43% 5% 18%[w]
Quinnipiac University July 30 – August 3, 2020 807 (RV) ± 3.5% 43% 47% 10%[x]
RMG Research July 27 – August 2, 2020 500 (RV) ± 4.5% 41% 48% 11%[y]
Data for Progress July 24 – August 2, 2020 866 (LV) ± 3.0% 45% 48% 7%[z]
Colby College/SocialSphere July 18–24, 2020 888 (LV) ± 3.9% 39% 44% 18%[aa]
Public Policy Polling July 22–23, 2020 561 (V) ± 3.6% 42% 47% 11%[ab]
Public Policy Polling July 2–3, 2020 1,022 (V) ± 3.1% 42% 46% 11%[ac]
Moore Information (R)[A] June 20–24, 2020[ad] 600 (RV) ± 4.0% 45% 37% 3% 1%[ae]
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 (LV) ± 4.3% 42% 51% 7%[af]
Tarrance Group (R)[C] April 2020 [ag] 48% 47% 5%
Public Policy Polling March 2–3, 2020 872 (V) ± 3.3% 43% 47% 10%[ah]
Colby College/SocialSphere February 10–13, 2020 1,008 (LV) ± 3.1% 42% 43% 14%[ai]
Fabrizio Ward[B] July 29–31, 2019 600 (LV) ± 4.0% 52% 35% 13%[aj]
Gravis Marketing June 24, 2019 767 (RV) ± 3.5% 44%[ak] 30% 26%[al]
52%[am] 36% 12%[an]
Pan Atlantic Research March 4–13, 2019 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 51% 29% 20%[ao]
Hypothetical polling
with Betsy Sweet
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Betsy Sweet (D) Susan
Collins (R)
Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 (LV) ± 4.3% 44% 43% 10%
with Susan Rice
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Susan
Rice (D)
Susan
Collins (R)
Other /
Undecided
Emerson College[2] October 27–29, 2018 883 (LV)[ap] ± 3.5% 20% 44% 35%
with generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Susan Collins (R) Other /
Undecided
Victory Geek (D) May 13–18, 2020 512 (LV) ± 4.3% 49% 39% 12%[aq]
Colby College/SocialSphere [3] Feb 10–13, 2020 1,008 (LV) ± 3.1% 34% 40% 26%
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 (V) ± 3.2% 44% 41% 15%[ar]
Public Policy Polling October 1–2, 2018 [as] ± 3.3% 34% 42%
Public Policy Polling (D)[D] August 28–29, 2017 501 (V) 21% 51% 27%[at]
with generic Democrat if Collins supports impeaching Donald Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Susan
Collins (R)
Other /
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 (V) ± 3.2% 38% 32% 30%[au]
with generic Democrat if Collins opposes impeaching Donald Trump
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Democrat
Susan
Collins (R)
Other /
Undecided
Public Policy Polling October 11–13, 2019 939 (V) ± 3.2% 47% 40% 13%[av]
on whether Collins deserves to be re-elected
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Yes No Other /
Undecided
Fabrizio Ward[B] July 29–31, 2019 600 (LV) ± 4.0% 38% 55% 7%[aw]
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Siena College/NYT Upshot September 11–16, 2020 663 (LV) ± 5.1% 41% 53% 6%[ax]
Quinnipiac University September 10–14, 2020 1,183 (LV) ± 2.9% 40% 53% 7%[ay]
Fabrizio Ward[B] July 29–31, 2019 600 (LV) ± 4.0% 43% 42% 15%[az]

Results

United States Senate election in Maine, 2020
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Sara Gideon
Republican Susan Collins (incumbent)
Independent Max Linn
Independent Lisa Savage
Write-in
Total votes 100.0%

See also

Notes

Partisan clients
  1. ^ a b Poll sponsored by the NRSC, which exclusively supports Republican candidates in U.S. Senate elections.
  2. ^ a b c d Poll sponsored by AARP.
  3. ^ Poll sponsored by the 1820 PAC.
  4. ^ Poll sponsored by Our Lives on the Line
Voter samples
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ Likely primary voter subsample of 306 likely general election Democratic voters
  3. ^ Undecided with 17%
  4. ^ Undecided with 31%; LaJeunesse with 0%; "another candidate" with 2%
  5. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  6. ^ Linn (I) with 5%; Undecided with 6%
  7. ^ Undecided with 9%
  8. ^ Standard VI response
  9. ^ Linn (I) with 2%; "Other" and "Refused" with 1%; Undecided with 5%
  10. ^ Assigning the second preferences of non-Collins/Gideon voters
  11. ^ Linn (I) and "Refused" with 1%; "Other" with 0%; Undecided with 6%
  12. ^ Standard VI response
  13. ^ Linn (I) with 2%
  14. ^ Topline after Ranked Choice Voting is used
  15. ^ Would not vote with 1%; Linn (I) and "someone else" with 0%; "Undecided/Refused" with 6%
  16. ^ "Someone else" with 1%; Undecided with 3%
  17. ^ "Other" with 2%; Linn (I) with 0%; Undecided with 7%
  18. ^ Standard VI response
  19. ^ Undecided with 7%
  20. ^ If only Collins and Gideon were candidates
  21. ^ Would not vote with 1%; Undecided with 4%
  22. ^ Undecided with 7%
  23. ^ Would not vote with 2%; "Prefer not to say" with 1%; Undecided with 14%
  24. ^ "Someone else" and would not vote with 2%; Undecided with 6%
  25. ^ Undecided with 11%
  26. ^ "No one" with 7%
  27. ^ "Minor party candidates" with 6%; Undecided with 12%
  28. ^ Undecided with 11%
  29. ^ Undecided with 11%
  30. ^ Additional data sourced from FiveThirtyEight
  31. ^ Linn (I) with 1%
  32. ^ Undecided with 7%
  33. ^ Not yet released
  34. ^ Undecided with 10%
  35. ^ Undecided with 14%
  36. ^ Undecided with 12%; "Would not vote/would not vote for US Senate" with 1%
  37. ^ First choice on an RCV ballot if the candidates were Collins, Gideon and VanHelsing (I)
  38. ^ Undecided with 19%; VanHelsing with 7%
  39. ^ If only Collins and Gideon were candidates
  40. ^ Undecided with 12%
  41. ^ "Other" with 12%; Undecided with 8%
  42. ^ Using the likely voter screen for the 2018 U.S. Senate election in Maine
  43. ^ Undecided with 12%
  44. ^ Undecided with 15%
  45. ^ Not yet released
  46. ^ Undecided with 27%
  47. ^ Undecided with 30%
  48. ^ Undecided with 13%
  49. ^ "Refused" with 0%; Undecided with 7%
  50. ^ "Undecided/Refused" with 6%
  51. ^ Undecided with 7%
  52. ^ "Undecided/Don't know/Refused" with 15%

References

  1. ^ Amber Phillips (September 16, 2020), "The Senate seats most likely to flip in November", Washingtonpost.com, archived from the original on September 16, 2020
  2. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings". The Cook Political Report.
  3. ^ Leary, Mal (August 17, 2019). "New Report Calls Maine 2020 Senate Race A 'Toss-Up'". Maine Public.
  4. ^ Bowden, John (August 16, 2019). "Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up'". The Hill.
  5. ^ Carrigan, Don (August 23, 2019). "Political expert says next year's Senate race a 'toss-up'". News Center Maine.
  6. ^ Parlapiano, Alicia; Benzaquen, Mercy (June 22, 2017). "Where Senators Stand on the Health Care Bill". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  7. ^ "U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 115th Congress – 2nd Session". www.senate.gov.
  8. ^ "On the Nomination PN2259: Brett M. Kavanaugh, of Maryland, to ... – Senate Vote #223 – Oct 6, 2018". GovTrack.us.
  9. ^ "READ: Susan Collins' statement on impeachment witness vote". January 30, 2020.
  10. ^ "U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 116th Congress – 2nd Session". www.senate.gov.
  11. ^ "U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 116th Congress – 2nd Session". www.senate.gov.
  12. ^ "Guilty or Not Guilty H.Res. 755 – Senate Vote #33 – Feb 5, 2020". GovTrack.us.
  13. ^ "Guilty or Not Guilty H.Res. 755 – Senate Vote #34 – Feb 5, 2020". GovTrack.us.
  14. ^ "Susan Collins says Trump 'has learned' from impeachment case". theweek.com. February 4, 2020.
  15. ^ "Collins: Trump has learned 'a pretty big lesson' from impeachment". The Hill.
  16. ^ "Collins admits comments about Trump learning a lesson are 'aspirational'". The Hill.
  17. ^ "GOP Senator Susan Collins Argued Against $870 Million In Pandemic Funding, Said It Didn't Belong In 2009 Stimulus Package". Newsweek. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  18. ^ "Sen. Collins Defends Role in Axing Pandemic Flu Funds". Roll Call. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  19. ^ "Democrats say Collins broke two-term pledge Senator made promise in '96, '02, admits she underestimated seniority". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Letter to the Editor: Collins ignores her two-term pledge". Press Herald. Retrieved December 31, 2019.
  21. ^ Vella, Lauren (January 16, 2020). "Poll shows Collins displaces McConnell as most unpopular senator". TheHill. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  22. ^ Bowden, John (August 23, 2019). "Susan Collins challenger hit with ethics complaints over reimbursements". TheHill. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  23. ^ Winger, Richard (February 24, 2020). "Maine Green Party Fails to get its U.S. Senate Candidate on the Green Party Primary Ballot | Ballot Access News".
  24. ^ "For People, Planet & Peace: Interview with Lisa Savage, Ind. Candidate for Senate in Maine". CounterPunch.org. May 15, 2020.
  25. ^ a b Shepherd, Michael (February 24, 2020). "Green US Senate candidate to unenroll for easier path to Maine ballot in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved August 22, 2020.
  26. ^ "Max Linn Cleared For Ballot After Challenge Is Withdrawn". www.mainepublic.org. July 18, 2020.
  27. ^ Piper, Jessica (July 28, 2020). "Max Linn now says he'll only quit Senate race if Susan Collins endorses 5 policies". Bangor Daily News.
  28. ^ Andrews, Caitlin (December 18, 2019). "Mills officially pushes back June elections to July 14". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 10, 2020.
  29. ^ "'Queer Feminist Mermaid' Surfaces to Challenge Susan Collins". Washington Free Beacon. April 29, 2019. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  30. ^ Collins, Steve (May 3, 2019). "'Queer feminist mermaid' hopes to unseat Collins". Lewiston Sun Journal. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  31. ^ Mikelionis, Lukas (May 8, 2019). "'Queer feminist mermaid' Dem aims for Senate seat of Maine's Susan Collins". Fox News. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  32. ^ a b Shepherd, Michael (June 13, 2019). "Progressive Democrat Betsy Sweet unveils bid to challenge Susan Collins". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved June 13, 2019.
  33. ^ a b Graham, Gillian (June 24, 2019). "Gideon announces she will challenge Collins in 2020". Kennebec Journal. Retrieved June 24, 2019.
  34. ^ Saul, Stephanie (June 24, 2019). "Sara Gideon to Challenge Susan Collins for Maine Senate Seat". The New York Times. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  35. ^ Wagner, John (June 24, 2019). "Susan Collins draws a Democratic challenger who seeks to undermine her moderate image". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  36. ^ Cillizza, Chris (June 24, 2019). "Susan Collins had a very bad day today". CNN. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  37. ^ "Maine Democratic U.S. Senate hopeful Sara Gideon skips debate". Press Herald. Associated Press. June 9, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  38. ^ "Maine Democratic US Senate hopeful Gideon misses debate". Newsradio WGAN. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  39. ^ Piper, Jessica (July 7, 2020). "Underdogs get last chance to challenge Democratic favorite in Maine US Senate debate". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  40. ^ Collins, Steve (April 22, 2019). "Saco lawyer Bre Kidman seeks Democratic backing to challenge Susan Collins". Lewiston Sun Journal. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  41. ^ Weinland, Gerald [@DirigoBlue] (December 19, 2018). "Michael Bunker of Bangor has filed to run as a Dem against @SenatorCollins in 2020 #mepolitics #mesen" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  42. ^ "Christine Gates". Ballotpedia. Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  43. ^ LaJeunesse, Ross (March 26, 2020). "Statement from Ross LaJeunesse". Medium. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  44. ^ Dr Cathleen London [@DrChaya] (July 16, 2018). "I am running because #SCOTUS cannot wait @SenatorCollins needs to realize that Maine & the country are watching & she will be held accountable for her votes #mepolitics My announcement: www.doctorcatlondonforme.com/_api/media-share-server-for-video/crp5?instance-id=5f191a6c-020c-4fc6-9b82-2786411308cb&component-id=comp-jjog8axh&channel-id=2435a32f-3d87-4ae1-aac4-b8175b02e63c&video-id=b3603e263c0a42348786f1c1f8fe8d60&bi-token=8a23ff18-94ae-0e5a-0a87-60cb8863dede … @DrCat4ME" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  45. ^ "LONDON, CATHLEEN GREENBERG DR – Candidate overview". FEC.gov.
  46. ^ a b "Independent challenging Collins aims to be first transgender member of Congress". Brunswick Times Record. January 25, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  47. ^ Morin, Ed (October 22, 2019). "Retired General From Oxford Withdraws From US Senate Race". MPBN. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  48. ^ a b c Shepherd, Michael (January 18, 2019). "Democrats aren't racing to run against Susan Collins in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  49. ^ a b @SaraGideonME (June 24, 2019). "Unbelievably honored to have the endorsement of so many Mainers as I launch my campaign for U.S. Senate to defeat Susan Collins. I will always put Maine first and I'm proud to have the support of these dedicated public servants. #MESen #MEpolitics" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  50. ^ a b c d e f g h Milliard, Mike (May 23, 2019). "Calling all challengers". Pine Tree Watch. Retrieved May 24, 2019.
  51. ^ a b c d e Villeneuve, Marina; Peoples, Steve; Pace, Julie (October 9, 2018). "Democrats lining up to consider challenging Collins in 2020". Associated Press. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  52. ^ Dan Merica; Eric Bradner; Gregory Krieg. "The effort to unseat Susan Collins in 2020 is already underway". CNN. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  53. ^ a b Collins, Steve (May 6, 2019). "Lewiston lawyer might challenge Collins in 2020". Lewiston Sun Journal.
  54. ^ a b Shepherd, Michael (June 5, 2019). "Here's the latest on Maine Democrats mulling a run against Susan Collins in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 2, 2019.
  55. ^ Collins, Steve [@SteveCollinsSJ] (May 20, 2019). "Not surprising, but @RepGolden said today he is not going to run for US Senate. He said he respects @SenatorCollins & her approach to governing, even if he doesn't always agree with her. Besides, he said, his #ME02 seat is "not a stepping stone" & he plans to stay. #mepolitics" (Tweet). Retrieved May 20, 2019 – via Twitter.
  56. ^ "Former Maine Gov. John Baldacci wants Stephen King to run for office: 'You've got a winner there'". Washington Examiner. September 12, 2017. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  57. ^ Budryk, Zack (June 24, 2019). "Stephen King: 'It's time for Susan Collins to go'". TheHill. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  58. ^ a b Stuart, Tessa (October 5, 2018). "Anti-Susan Collins Campaign Raises $2 Million, Crashes During Kavanaugh Speech". Rolling Stone. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  59. ^ Gray, Emma; Vagianos, Alanna (April 11, 2019). "Susan Rice Will Not Run Against Susan Collins For Maine Senate Seat In 2020". HuffPost. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  60. ^ Emerson, Anthony Matthew [@AnthonyEmerso14] (June 17, 2019). "Love that Betsy Sweet has a disclaimer on emails sent from email lists that were not her own. Shows a commitment to transparency. Also, hey, @RingelsteinME is backing her!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  61. ^ "Maine U.S. Senate Democratic Primary". Maine Secretary of State. August 8, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  62. ^ Ohm, Rachel (December 18, 2019). "Sen. Susan Collins announces re-election campaign". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  63. ^ a b c "MAINE". Politics1. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  64. ^ Shepherd, Michael (March 25, 2019). "A Trump Republican says he'll challenge Susan Collins from the right in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  65. ^ Shepherd, Michael (September 9, 2019). "Longshot Republican primary challenger to Susan Collins exits 2020 race". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  66. ^ Thistle, Scott (June 8, 2018). "Federal judge rejects Max Linn's effort to run in Maine Republican primary". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  67. ^ @mikeshepherdME (August 4, 2019). ".@BrucePoliquin confirms that he won't run for office in 2020. It might leave @SenatorBrakey alone in the #me02 primary. #mepolitics" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  68. ^ "Maine U.S. Senate Republican Primary". Maine Secretary of State. August 8, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  69. ^ Shepherd, Michael (July 23, 2019). "Green candidate's entry pushes Maine toward ranked-choice U.S. Senate race in 2020". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  70. ^ a b "Lisa for Maine". Lisa for Maine.
  71. ^ a b c Shephard, Michael (February 24, 2020). "Green US Senate candidate to unenroll for easier path to Maine ballot in 2020". BDN Politics. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  72. ^ Bond, Tiffany [@TiffanyBond] (November 14, 2019). "If only you hadn't voted for a tax bill that buries us in an absurd amount of debt and hinders our flexibility to find solutions. You may not have children, but I do, and they deserve a goddam future without crippling debt and a crumbling planet. Hire a mom for Senate" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  73. ^ a b c d e f g "Upcoming Elections". Maine Secretary of State. August 3, 2020. Retrieved August 16, 2020.
  74. ^ a b c "Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions". maine.gov.
  75. ^ @ForFogg (August 24, 2020). "Combined, Susan Collins and Sara Gideon have spent $30 million dollars so far trying to convince you to vote for them, or, based on the negative campaigning, convincing you not to vote for the other.  You have an alternative!  Write-in Douglas Fogg for U.S. Senate!" (Tweet). Retrieved September 10, 2020 – via Twitter.
  76. ^ @MESecofState (December 17, 2018). "1/2 The Libertarian Party no longer has party status in the State of Maine, as it did not reach the threshold of 10,000 voters in the Nov. 6 General Election, as required in Maine law. If you were enrolled as a Libertarian, you are now "unenrolled" as of Dec. 4" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  77. ^ "Millinocket town councilor enters race to unseat Susan Collins". Bangor Daily News. February 9, 2020. Retrieved February 9, 2020.
  78. ^ Cover, Susan (April 15, 2020). "Stay-at-home order threatens to derail independent candidates". Pine Tree Watch. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  79. ^ "2020 Senate Race Ratings for April 19, 2019". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  80. ^ "2020 Senate Ratings". Senate Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved July 17, 2020.
  81. ^ "2020 Senate race ratings". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  82. ^ "Daily Kos Elections releases initial Senate race ratings for 2020". Daily Kos Elections. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  83. ^ "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. November 19, 2019.
  84. ^ "Battle for White House". RCP. April 19, 2019.
  85. ^ "2020 Negative Partisanship and the 2020 Congressional Elections". Niskanen Center. April 28, 2020.
  86. ^ "2020 Senate Elections Model". Decision Desk HQ. September 2, 2020. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  87. ^ Silver, Nate (September 18, 2020). "Forecasting the race for the Senate". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  88. ^ Axelrod, Tal (July 15, 2020). "Susan Collins proposes 16 debates against challenger Gideon". TheHill. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  89. ^ Obama, Barack (August 3, 2020). "First Wave of 2020 Endorsements". Medium.
  90. ^ "Joe Biden endorses Sara Gideon for US Senate". newscentermaine.com.
  91. ^ Watson, Eleanor (June 26, 2019). "National Democrats rally behind Maine lawmaker Sara Gideon's bid to beat Susan Collins". CBS News. Retrieved June 29, 2019.
  92. ^ Sero, Sam (July 23, 2019). "ME-Sen: Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D. IL) Helps Sara Gideon (D) Get Ready To Defeat Susan Collins (R)". Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  93. ^ Gontcharova, Natalie (December 13, 2019). "Democrats Could Flip The Senate In 2020. Kirsten Gillibrand Wants To Be Behind That Effort".
  94. ^ "Kamala Harris Endorsements". May 9, 2020.
  95. ^ "ME-Sen: Sen. Chris Murphy (D. CT) Helps ME House Speaker Sara Gideon (D) Defeat Susan Collins (R)". Daily Kos. June 28, 2019. Retrieved August 14, 2019.
  96. ^ "Endorsements | Warren Democrats". elizabethwarren.com.
  97. ^ "Representative Chellie Pingree Endorses Sara Gideon for U.S. Senate". SaraGideon.com. July 16, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  98. ^ "Gov. Mills endorses Gideon for US Senate". WCSH. July 16, 2020. Retrieved July 16, 2020.
  99. ^ "Stacey Abrams endorses candidates in 7 US Senate contests".
  100. ^ Budryck, Zack (June 24, 2019). "Stephen King: 'It's time for Susan Collins to go'". The Hill. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  101. ^ Rachel Ohm. "LaJeunesse ends Senate campaign, endorses Gideon".
  102. ^ a b c "Sara Gideon's Ratings and Endorsements".
  103. ^ "Bend the Arc Jewish Action PAC". Bend the Arc: Jewish Action.
  104. ^ "Senate Candidates – Council for a Livable World". Council for a Livable World.
  105. ^ "Democratic Majority for Israel". DMFI PAC.
  106. ^ "2020 Candidates". Emerge America.
  107. ^ "Sen. Susan Collins Loses Endorsement Of Major Gun Control Group". huffpost.com.
  108. ^ "2020 – Feminist Majority PAC". feministmajoritypac.org.
  109. ^ "JStreetPAC Candidates". JStreetPAC.
  110. ^ "Meet the 2020 Candidates". Joint Action Committee for Political Affairs.
  111. ^ Miller, Hayley (June 25, 2019). "Democrat Sara Gideon Nabs 3 Key Endorsements In Maine's 2020 Senate Race". Retrieved June 29, 2019.
  112. ^ "NRDC Action Fund Endorses 9 House, Senate Candidates". www.nrdcactionfund.org. June 30, 2020.
  113. ^ "2020 Endorsements". www.plannedparenthoodaction.org.
  114. ^ "2020 Endorsements". Population Connection.
  115. ^ "Sierra Club #ClimateVoter Guide: Endorsements". Sierra Club.
  116. ^ "Endorsements – Voter Protection Project". Voter Protection Project.
  117. ^ "Federal Endorsed Candidates 2019–2020". Women's Political Committee.
  118. ^ a b c d e f g "Seven Labor Unions Endorse Sara Gideon for U.S. Senate". June 24, 2019. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  119. ^ "Trump agrees '100%' that Susan Collins' 2020 re-election is crucial for Republicans". Bangor Daily News. December 24, 2019.
  120. ^ "George W. Bush to hold virtual fundraiser for Republican senators". The Washington Post.
  121. ^ Everett, Burgess (April 11, 2019). "Joe Manchin endorses Susan Collins for reelection". Politico. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  122. ^ Writer, Eric RussellStaff (September 9, 2020). "Former Democratic senator, vice presidential nominee Lieberman endorses Collins".
  123. ^ Herald, William S. CohenSpecial to the Press (September 18, 2020). "William Cohen: Seasoned, trustworthy Susan Collins deserves re-election to U.S. Senate".
  124. ^ "Baker, long averse to national GOP politics, backs Susan Collins in Maine Senate race - The Boston Globe". BostonGlobe.com.
  125. ^ Greenwood, Max (September 18, 2020). "Blue state GOP Govs. Larry Hogan, Charlie Baker endorse Susan Collins". The Hill. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  126. ^ "Paul LePage downplays past criticism of Susan Collins: 'I absolutely endorse' her". Bangor Daily News.
  127. ^ "2020 Candidates". maggieslist.org.
  128. ^ "Maine Fraternal Order of Police endorses Susan Collins for US Senate". WGME. September 10, 2020.
  129. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Endorsements". Lisa for Maine. August 14, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  130. ^ "Bre Kidman endorses Lisa Savage for US Senate". Lisa for Maine. July 30, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  131. ^ "Lisa Savage for U.S. Senate". davidswanson.org. June 8, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  132. ^ "Maine DSA Endorses U.S. Senate Candidate Lisa Savage". Lisa for Maine. September 15, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  133. ^ "We are proud to announce Maine DSA has voted to endorse Lisa Savage for U.S. Senate!". Maine DSA. September 15, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2020.
  134. ^ "Maine Green Independent Party Endorses US Senate Candidate Savage". Lisa for Maine. August 22, 2020. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  135. ^ "Maine Senate Election". The Good Party. July 17, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  136. ^ "Voters in Maine this year get to do something envied and desired by much of the United States: vote for a thoroughly progressive candidate without worrying about in any way benefitting the worst candidate on the ballot". RootsAction. August 25, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  137. ^ "Jared Golden vows to remain neutral in Susan Collins' US Senate race". Lewiston Sun Journal. September 4, 2019. Retrieved September 9, 2019.

External links

Official campaign websites

This page was last edited on 27 September 2020, at 00:02
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.