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2022 Arizona elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2022 Arizona elections

← 2020
2024 →

A general election will be held in the U.S. state of Arizona on November 8, 2022, coinciding with the nationwide general election. All of Arizona's executive offices will be up for election, as well as the state's congressional seats.

In recent years, Arizona's status as a Republican stronghold has weakened as more elections in the state have been won by Democratic candidates. After Joe Biden carried the state in 2020, Arizona is considered a swing state in the 2022 election.[1][2]

United States Congress

Senate

Incumbent Democratic senator Mark Kelly was first elected in a 2020 special election with 51.2% of the vote. He intends to run for a full term.[3]

House of Representatives

Arizona has nine seats to the United States House of Representatives which are currently held by five Democrats and four Republicans. Due to redistricting after the 2020 census, Arizona is projected to gain one seat in 2022.[4]

Statewide offices

Governor

Incumbent Republican Governor Doug Ducey will be term-limited by the Arizona Constitution in 2022 and will not be able to seek re-election. He was re-elected in 2018 with 56.0% of the vote.

Secretary of State

Incumbent Democratic Secretary of State Katie Hobbs is eligible for re-election. She was first elected in 2018 with 50.4% of the vote.

Potential Republican candidates

Potential Democrat candidates

Attorney General

Incumbent Republican Attorney General Mark Brnovich is unable to run for re-election. He was re-elected in 2018 with 51.7% of the vote.

State Treasurer

Incumbent Republican State Treasurer Kimberly Yee is eligible for re-election. She was first elected in 2018 with 54.3% of the vote.

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Incumbent Democratic Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman is eligible for re-election. She was first elected in 2018 with 51.6% of the vote.

Mine Inspector

Incumbent Republican Mine Inspector Joe Hart is unable to run for re-election. He was re-elected in 2018 with 51.7% of the vote.

Corporation Commission

Two of the five seats on the Corporation Commission are up for election, elected by plurality block voting. Incumbents Sandra Kennedy, a Democrat, and Justin Olson, a Republican, are eligible for re-election.

State Legislature

All 90 seats in both chambers of the Arizona State Legislature are up for election in 2022. Republicans currently hold a minimum majority in both chambers.

Judicial Department

Supreme Court justices Ann Timmer, James Beene, and Bill Montgomery must stand for retention. Justice Timmer was retained in 2016 with 76.71% of the vote.[7] Justices Beene and Montgomery were both appointed in 2019.

Ballot propositions

No statewide ballot measures are currently scheduled for this election.

References

  1. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (June 29, 2020). "How Arizona Became A Swing State". FiveThirtyEight.
  2. ^ Hansen, Ronald (December 22, 2020). "2020 in politics: Arizona lives up to reputation as battleground state". azcentral.
  3. ^ Conradis, Brandon (January 1, 2021). "Seven Senate races to watch in 2022". The Hill.
  4. ^ Skelley, Geoffrey (January 29, 2015). "Updated 2020 Reapportionment Projections". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Archived from the original on October 21, 2016. Retrieved October 28, 2016.
  5. ^ Brufke, Juliegrace (March 1, 2021). "House Freedom Caucus chair weighs Arizona Senate bid". The Hill.
  6. ^ 'Yellosheet Report' April 2, 2021
  7. ^ "2016 General Election November 8, 2016 Unofficial Results". azsos.gov. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 15, 2016.

External links

This page was last edited on 11 April 2021, at 00:34
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