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List of United States Senators from Washington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Current delegation

Washington was admitted to the Union on November 11, 1889, and elects its United States Senators to Class 1 and Class 3. Its current U.S. Senators are Democrats Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ How the States Can Save America
  • ✪ Constitution Day Lecture: Kelly Ayotte, Former United States Senator for NH

Transcription

The federal government has become a lumbering giant. With each passing year, it gets bigger and scarier. In 1965, Washington was 761 billion dollars big. In 2016... it was 3.5 trillion – five times the size. If the government spent only the money it collected in taxes, that would be one thing. But it always spends more — which is why we’re $20 trillion dollars in debt. That’s 13 zeroes. Count ‘em: Thirteen. But the crazy spending isn’t even the worst of it. Washington is involved in every part of our lives. Think about anything you do, from driving your car to buying your groceries to mowing your lawn. Whatever it is — your education, your job, your health — the government has its hands on your shoulder, if not on your throat. As a congressman and senator for 14 years, I know this only too well. So, how do we cut this giant down to size? Is it even possible? Yes. And the amazing thing is, the answer is right in front of us. The Founding Fathers, in their wisdom, foresaw the situation we find ourselves in today. They wrote into the Constitution a way to repair Washington...not from the inside, because that will never happen but from the outside, where it might. It’s right there in Article 5. Most people are familiar with the first part: “The Congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution...” All 27 Amendments we have now started this way. Congress proposed them and at least three-quarters of the states ratified them. But is this the only way to amend the Constitution? Well, let’s read the next clause: It says that Congress, “…on the application of the legislatures of two thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments...” Did you catch that? Congress must call a convention to amend the Constitution if two-thirds of the states — that’s 34 states — demand it. The time has come to demand it. The time has come to propose amendments that will restore meaningful limits on federal power and authority. The time has come for a convention of states. Here’s how it would work: Once the 34 states call a convention, all 50 states send a delegate to represent their interests. For any constitutional amendments proposed, each state gets one vote. And an amendment only passes out of the convention and to the states for ratification if a majority of the states’ delegates vote in the affirmative. In this scenario, Congress has no say. It is completely in the hands of the states, which means it’s a whole lot closer to the hands of the people. We’ve never once amended the Constitution this way — but that doesn’t mean we can’t. But, you might ask, doesn’t this open the door to rewriting the entire Constitution? Antonin Scalia, the late Supreme Court justice, acknowledged this risk, but regarded it as a “minimal” and “reasonable” one. Why? Because to be ratified, a proposed amendment would need the approval of 38 states. That’s a high bar. Thirty-eight states would never agree to something radical like abolishing freedom of speech. “The Founders,” Scalia said, “knew the Congress would be unwilling to give attention to many issues the people are concerned with, particularly those involving restrictions on the federal government’s own power... [so] they provided the convention [of states] as a remedy.” This should not be a partisan, left/right, Democrat/Republican issue. This should be a "who controls your life" issue: you or the government? Today, politicians can turn your life upside down on a whim, kind of like King George in 1775. Being at the mercy of distant, disconnected rulers was why the American Revolution was fought in the first place! But we don’t need a revolution. We have Article Five. So, what amendments might a Convention of States propose to limit Washington’s power? Term limits, for one. No one should be in Congress for 20 or 30 years. The only people who disagree have been in Congress for 20 or 30 years. And how about a limit on taxes, spending and borrowing? Since you began this video, the national debt has gone up $8.4 million dollars. Here’s one more idea: A constitutional amendment that Congress can't exempt itself from the laws it passes — something it’s done dozens of times, from insider trading to Obamacare. Now, I don’t believe a Convention of States will solve all of America’s problems. But the Founders put it in the Constitution for a reason. They knew a time would come when Washington would become so big, and so intrusive, that only we the people could cut it down to size. That time is now. I’m Jim DeMint for Prager University.

Contents

List of Senators

Class 1

Class 1 U.S. Senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 2000, 2006, 2012, and 2018. The next election will be in 2024.

C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

Class 3

Class 3 U.S. Senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 1998, 2004, 2010, and 2016. The next election will be in 2022.

# Senator Party Years in office Electoral history T
e
r
m
T
e
r
m
Electoral history Years in office Party Senator #
Vacant November 11, 1889 –
November 20, 1889
Washington elected its first senators after it was admitted to the Union. 1 51st 1 Washington elected its first senators after it was admitted to the Union. November 11, 1889 –
November 20, 1889
Vacant
1
John Beard Allen.jpg

John B. Allen
Republican November 20, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
Elected in 1889.

Legislature failed to re-elect.
Elected in 1889. November 20, 1889 –
March 3, 1897
Republican
Watson C Squire.jpg

Watson C. Squire
1
52nd 2 Re-elected in 1891.

Lost re-election.
Vacant March 4, 1893 –
February 19, 1895
The legislature failed to elect a senator for the term beginning March 4, 1893. The governor appointed John Allen to serve until March 20, 1893, but the Senate rejected his credentials. 2 53rd
2
John L. Wilson.jpg

John L. Wilson
Republican February 19, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
Elected February 1, 1895 to finish the vacant term, but took his seat late.

Lost renomination.
54th
55th 3 Elected January 29, 1897.[1]

Lost re-election.[2]
March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
Democratic
George Turner (U.S. politician).jpg

George Turner
2
3
Addison Foster.jpg

Addison G. Foster
Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1905
Elected February 1, 1899.[3]

Retired.
3 56th
57th
58th 4 Elected January 29, 1903.[2]

Lost renomination.
March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1909
Republican
Levi Ankeny.jpg

Levi Ankeny
3
4
Seattle politician Samuel H. Piles, circa 1910.jpg

Samuel H. Piles
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1911
Elected January 27, 1905.[4]

Retired.
4 59th
60th
61st 5 Elected January 19, 1909. March 4, 1909 –
November 19, 1932
Republican
Wesley Livsey Jones.jpg

Wesley L. Jones
4
5
MilesPoindexter.jpg

Miles Poindexter
Republican March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1923
Elected in 1910 5 62nd
Progressive 63rd
Republican 64th 6 Re-elected in 1914
Re-elected in 1916.

Lost re-election.
6 65th
66th
67th 7 Re-elected in 1920
6
Clarence Cleveland Dill.jpg

Clarence C. Dill
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
January 3, 1935
Elected in 1922 7 68th
69th
70th 8 Re-elected in 1926.

Died, having already lost re-election.
Re-elected in 1928.

Retired.
8 71st
72nd
  November 19, 1932 –
November 22, 1932
Vacant
Appointed to finish Jones's term.

Retired.
November 22, 1932 –
March 3, 1933
Republican
Elijah Grammer.jpg

Elijah S. Grammer
5
73rd 9 Elected in 1932 March 4, 1933 –
November 13, 1944
Democratic
Homer Bone.jpg

Homer Bone
6
7
Lbschwellenbach.jpg

Lewis B. Schwellenbach
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
December 16, 1940
Elected in 1934.

Resigned.
9 74th
75th
76th 10 Re-elected in 1938.

Resigned to become Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
Vacant December 16, 1940 –
December 19, 1940
 
8
Monrad Charles Wallgren.jpg

Monrad C. Wallgren
Democratic December 19, 1940 –
January 9, 1945
Appointed to finish Schwellenbach's term, having already been elected to the next term.
Elected in 1940.

Resigned.
10 77th
78th
  November 13, 1944 –
December 14, 1944
Vacant
Appointed to finish Bone's term, having already been elected to the next term. December 14, 1944 –
January 3, 1981
Democratic
WarrenGMagnuson.jpg

Warren Magnuson
7
79th 11 Elected in 1944
9
Hugh Mitchell.jpg

Hugh B. Mitchell
Democratic January 10, 1945 –
December 25, 1946
Appointed to finish Wallgren's term.

Lost election to next term and resigned early.
10
HP Cain Senate.jpg

Harry P. Cain
Republican December 26, 1946 –
January 3, 1953
Appointed to finish Mitchell's term, having already been elected to the next term.
Elected in 1946.

Lost re-election.
11 80th
81st
82nd 12 Re-elected in 1950
11
HenryJackson.jpg

Henry M. Jackson
Democratic January 3, 1953 –
September 1, 1983
Elected in 1952 12 83rd
84th
85th 13 Re-elected in 1956
Re-elected in 1958 13 86th
87th
88th 14 Re-elected in 1962
Re-elected in 1964 14 89th
90th
91st 15 Re-elected in 1968
Re-elected in 1970 15 92nd
93rd
94th 16 Re-elected in 1974.

Lost re-election.
Re-elected in 1976 16 95th
96th
97th 17 Elected in 1980.

Lost re-election.
January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1987
Republican
Slade Gorton, official Senate photo portrait.jpg

Slade Gorton
8
Re-elected in 1982.

Died.
17 98th
Vacant September 1, 1983 –
September 8, 1983
 
12
DanielJEvans.jpg

Daniel J. Evans
Republican September 8, 1983 –
January 3, 1989
Appointed to continue Jackson's term.

Elected to finish Jackson's term.

Retired.
99th
100th 18 Elected in 1986.

Retired.
January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1993
Democratic
Brock Adams.jpg

Brock Adams
9
13
Slade Gorton, official Senate photo portrait.jpg

Slade Gorton
Republican January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 2001
Elected in 1988 18 101st
102nd
103rd 19 Elected in 1992 January 3, 1993 –
Present
Democratic
Patty Murray, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg

Patty Murray
10
Re-elected in 1994.

Lost re-election.
19 104th
105th
106th 20 Re-elected in 1998
14
Maria Cantwell, official portrait, 110th Congress.jpg

Maria Cantwell
Democratic January 3, 2001 –
Present
Elected in 2000 20 107th
108th
109th 21 Re-elected in 2004
Re-elected in 2006 21 110th
111th
112th 22 Re-elected in 2010
Re-elected in 2012 22 113th
114th
115th 23 Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018. 23 116th
117th
118th 24 To be determined in the 2022 election.
To be determined in the 2024 election. 24 119th
# Senator Party Years in office Electoral history T
e
r
m
  T
e
r
m
Electoral history Years in office Party Senator #
Class 1 Class 3

Living former U.S. Senators from Washington

As of January 2019, there are two living former Senators, both from Class 1 (although Gorton had also served in Class 3). The most recent senator to die was Brock Adams (served 1987–1993) on September 10, 2004, who is also the most recently serving Senator to die.

Senator Term of office Class Date of birth (and age)
Daniel J. Evans 1983–1989 1 (1925-10-16) October 16, 1925 (age 93)
Slade Gorton 1981–1987
1989–2001
3
1
(1928-01-08) January 8, 1928 (age 91)

See also

References

  1. ^ "TURNER ELECTED SENATOR". The New York Times. January 30, 1897. p. 1.
  2. ^ a b "Ankeny Elected in Washington". The New York Times. January 30, 1903. p. 1.
  3. ^ "AN ELECTION IN WASHINGTON". The New York Times. February 2, 1899. p. 2.
  4. ^ The World Almanac and Encyclopedia 1906. New York: The Press Publishing Co. New York World. 1905. p. 108.
This page was last edited on 28 May 2019, at 17:43
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