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United States congressional delegations from Mississippi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mississippi's congressional districts since 2013[1]

These are tables of congressional delegations from Mississippi to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

The current dean of the Mississippi delegation is Representative Bennie Thompson (MS-2), having served in the House since 1993.

United States Senate

Current delegation
Class I senators Congress Class II senators
Walter Leake (DR) 15th (1817–1819) Thomas Hill Williams (DR)
16th (1819–1821)
David Holmes (DR)
17th (1821–1823)
18th (1823–1825)
David Holmes (J) 19th (1825–1827) Thomas Hill Williams (J)
Powhatan Ellis (J)
Thomas Buck Reed (J)
Powhatan Ellis (J) 20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831) Thomas Buck Reed (J)
Robert H. Adams (J)
George Poindexter (J)
22nd (1831–1833) George Poindexter (NR)
John Black (J)
John Black (NR) 23rd (1833–1835)
24th (1835–1837) Robert J. Walker (J)
John Black (W) 25th (1837–1839) Robert J. Walker (D)
James F. Trotter (D)
Thomas Hickman Williams (D)
John Henderson (W) 26th (1839–1841)
27th (1841–1843)
28th (1843–1845)
Jesse Speight (D) 29th (1845–1847)
Joseph W. Chalmers (D)
30th (1847–1849) Henry S. Foote (D)
Jefferson Davis (D)
31st (1849–1851)
John J. McRae (D) 32nd (1851–1853)
Stephen Adams (D) Walker Brooke (W)
33rd (1853–1855) Albert G. Brown (D)
34th (1855–1857)
Jefferson Davis (D) 35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861)
American Civil War American Civil War
37th (1861–1863)
38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869)
41st (1869–1871)
Adelbert Ames (R) Hiram Rhodes Revels (R)
42nd (1871–1873) James L. Alcorn (R)
43rd (1873–1875)
Henry R. Pease (R)
Blanche Bruce (R) 44th (1875–1877)
45th (1877–1879) Lucius Quintus
Cincinnatus Lamar
(D)
46th (1879–1881)
James Z. George (D) 47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
Edward C. Walthall (D)
50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895)
Anselm J. McLaurin (D)
54th (1895–1897) Edward C. Walthall (D)
55th (1897–1899)
Hernando Money (D) William V. Sullivan (D)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903) Anselm J. McLaurin (D)
58th (1903–1905)
59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911)
James Gordon (D)
LeRoy Percy (D)
John Sharp Williams (D) 62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915) James K. Vardaman (D)
64th (1915–1917)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921) Pat Harrison (D)
67th (1921–1923)
Hubert D. Stephens (D) 68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935)
Theodore G. Bilbo (D) 74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
James Eastland (D)
Wall Doxey (D)
78th (1943–1945) James Eastland (D)
79th (1945–1947)
80th (1947–1949)
John C. Stennis (D)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
Thad Cochran (R)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983)
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)
Trent Lott (R) 101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
Roger Wicker (R)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013)
113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019)
Cindy Hyde-Smith (R)
116th (2019–2021)
117th (2021–2023)

U.S. House of Representatives

Current members

List of members, their terms in office, district boundaries, and the district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has 4 members: 3 Republicans and 1 Democrat.

District Member
Residence
Party Tenure CPVI District map
1st
Trent Kelly, Official Portrait, 115th Congress.jpg

Trent Kelly
(Tupelo)
Republican since June 2, 2015 R+18 Mississippi US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd
Bennie Thompson official photo.jpg

Bennie Thompson
(Jackson)
Democratic since April 13, 1993 D+13 Mississippi US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd
Michael Guest, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg

Michael Guest
(Brandon)
Republican since January 3, 2019 R+13 Mississippi US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th
Steven Palazzo, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg

Steven Palazzo
(Gulfport)
Republican since January 3, 2011 R+22 Mississippi US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif

Mississippi Territory

On April 7, 1798, the Mississippi Territory was created. Starting in 1801, the Territory sent one non-voting delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Congress Delegate
7th (1801–1803) Narsworthy Hunter (DR)
Thomas M. Green Jr. (DR)
8th (1803–1805) William Lattimore (DR)
9th (1805–1807)
10th (1807–1809) George Poindexter (DR)
11th (1809–1811)
12th (1811–1813)
13th (1813–1815) William Lattimore (DR)
14th (1815–1817)

State of Mississippi

On December 10, 1817, Mississippi was admitted into the Union as a state and sent one Representative to Congress, elected at-large statewide. After the 1830 census, Mississippi had two seats, elected statewide at-large on a general ticket. Starting in 1843, Mississippi's delegation was increased to four seats, still elected at-large statewide on a general ticket. After 1847, those seats were elected by representative districts. After the 1850 census, Mississippi gained a 5th seat. For the 33rd Congress, that fifth seat was elected at-large. Starting with the 34th Congress, the new seat was apportioned as a fifth district.

1817–1847: at-large elections

Congress At-large seat A
15th (1817–1819) George Poindexter (DR)
16th (1819–1821) Christopher Rankin (DR)[a]
17th (1821–1823)
18th (1823–1825)
19th (1825–1827) Christopher Rankin (J)
William Haile (J)
20th (1827–1829)
Thomas Hinds (J)
21st (1829–1831)
22nd (1831–1833) Franklin E. Plummer (J) At-large seat B
23rd (1833–1835) Harry Cage (J)
24th (1835–1837) J. F. H. Claiborne (J) David C. Dickson (NR)
Samuel J. Gholson (J)
25th (1837–1839) J. F. H. Claiborne (D)[b] Samuel J. Gholson (D)[b]
Seargent S. Prentiss (W) Thomas J. Word (W)
26th (1839–1841) Jacob Thompson (D) Albert G. Brown (D)
27th (1841–1843) William M. Gwin (D) At-large seat C At-large seat D
28th (1843–1845) William H. Hammett (D) Robert W. Roberts (D) Tilghman Tucker (D)
29th (1845–1847) Stephen Adams (D) Jefferson Davis (D)
Henry T. Ellett (D)

1847–1853: 4 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
30th (1847–1849) Jacob Thompson (D) Winfield S.
Featherston
(D)
Patrick W. Tompkins (W) Albert G. Brown (D)
31st (1849–1851) William McWillie (D)
32nd (1851–1853) Benjamin D. Nabers (U) John Allen Wilcox (U) John D. Freeman (U)

1853–1873: 5 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th At-large
33rd (1853–1855) Daniel B.
Wright
(D)
William S. Barry (D) Otho R. Singleton (D) Wiley P. Harris (D) William Barksdale (D)
34th (1855–1857) Hendley S.
Bennett
(D)
William
Barksdale
(D)[c]
William A. Lake (KN) 5th
John A. Quitman (D)
35th (1857–1859) Lucius Q. C.
Lamar
(D)
Reuben
Davis
(D)[c]
Otho R.
Singleton
(D)[c]
John J. McRae (D)[c]
36th (1859–1861)
American Civil War
3740th
(1861–1869)
41st (1869–1871)
George E.
Harris
(R)
Joseph L.
Morphis
(R)
Henry W. Barry (R) George C.
McKee
(R)
Legrand W. Perce (R)
42nd (1871–1873)

1873–1883: 6 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
43rd (1873–1875) Lucius Q. C.
Lamar
(D)
Albert R. Howe (R) Henry W.
Barry
(R)
Jason Niles (R) George C.
McKee
(R)
John R. Lynch (R)
44th (1875–1877) Guilford W. Wells (IR) Hernando
Money
(D)
Otho R.
Singleton
(D)
Charles E.
Hooker
(D)
45th (1877–1879) Henry L.
Muldrow
(D)
Van H. Manning (D) James R.
Chalmers
(D)
46th (1879–1881)
47th (1881–1883)
John R. Lynch (R)

1883–1903: 7 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th
48th (1883–1885) Henry L.
Muldrow
(D)
Van H. Manning (D) Elza
Jeffords
(R)
Hernando
Money
(D)
Ethelbert
Barksdale
(D)
Henry Smith
Van Eaton
(D)
Otho R.
Singleton
(D)
James R. Chalmers (I)
49th (1885–1887) John Mills
Allen
(D)
James B. Morgan (D) Thomas C.
Catchings
(D)
Frederick G.
Barry
(D)
50th (1887–1889) Chapman L.
Anderson
(D)
T. R. Stockdale (D) Charles E.
Hooker
(D)
51st (1889–1891) Clarke
Lewis
(D)
52nd (1891–1893) John C. Kyle (D) Jo Beeman (D)
53rd (1893–1895) Hernando
Money
(D)
John Sharp
Williams
(D)
54th (1895–1897) Walter Denny (D) James Spencer (D)
55th (1897–1899) W. V. Sullivan (D) Andrew F.
Fox
(D)
William Love (D) Patrick Henry (D)
Thomas Spight (D) Frank A.
McLain
(D)
56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903) Ezekiel
Candler
(D)
Pat Henry (D) Charles E.
Hooker
(D)

1903–1953: 8, then 7 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th
58th (1903–1905) Ezekiel
Candler
(D)
Thomas
Spight
(D)
Benjamin G.
Humphreys
(D)
Wilson S.
Hill
(D)
Adam M. Byrd (D) Eaton J.
Bowers
(D)
Frank A.
McLain
(D)
John Sharp
Williams
(D)
59th (1905–1907)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911) Thomas U.
Sisson
(D)
William A.
Dickson
(D)
James
Collier
(D)
62nd (1911–1913) Hubert D.
Stephens
(D)
Samuel Andrew
Witherspooon
(D)
Pat
Harrison
(D)
63rd (1913–1915) Percy Quin (D)
64th (1915–1917)
William W.
Venable
(D)
65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921) Paul B.
Johnson Sr.
(D)
67th (1921–1923) John E.
Rankin
(D)
Bill G.
Lowrey
(D)
Ross A. Collins (D)
68th (1923–1925) T. Jeff
Busby
(D)
T. Webber
Wilson
(D)
W. Y. Humphreys (D)
69th (1925–1927) William Madison
Whittington
(D)
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931) Wall
Doxey
(D)
Robert S.
Hall
(D)
72nd (1931–1933)
Lawrence R.
Ellzey
(D)
73rd (1933–1935) William M.
Colmer
(D)
74th (1935–1937) Aaron L.
Ford
(D)
Aubert C. Dunn (D) Dan R.
McGehee
(D)
75th (1937–1939) Ross A. Collins (D)
76th (1939–1941)
77th (1941–1943)
Jamie
Whitten
(D)
78th (1943–1945) Thomas
Abernethy
(D)
Arthur
Winstead
(D)
79th (1945–1947)
80th (1947–1949) John Bell
Williams
(D)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953) Frank E. Smith (D)

1953–1963: 6 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
83rd (1953–1955) Thomas
Abernethy
(D)
Jamie
Whitten
(D)
Frank Ellis
Smith
(D)
John Bell
Williams
(D)
W. Arthur
Winstead
(D)
William M.
Colmer
(D)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)

1963–present: 5, then 4 seats

Congress District
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
88th (1963–1965) Thomas
Abernethy
(D)
Jamie Whitten (D) John Bell
Williams
(D)
Arthur Winstead (D) William M.
Colmer
(D)
89th (1965–1967) Prentiss Walker (R)
90th (1967–1969) Sonny
Montgomery
(D)
Charles H.
Griffin
(D)
91st (1969–1971)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975) Jamie
Whitten
(D)
David R.
Bowen
(D)
Sonny
Montgomery
(D)
Thad Cochran (R) Trent Lott (R)
94th (1975–1977)
95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981) Jon Hinson (R)
97th (1981–1983)
Wayne Dowdy (D)
98th (1983–1985) Webb Franklin (R)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989) Mike Espy (D)
101st (1989–1991) Michael Parker (D) Larkin I. Smith (R)
Gene Taylor (D)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
Bennie
Thompson
(D)
104th (1995–1997) Roger
Wicker
(R)
Michael Parker (R)
105th (1997–1999) Chip Pickering (R)
106th (1999–2001) Ronnie Shows (D)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005) Gene Taylor (D)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
Travis
Childers
(D)
111th (2009–2011) Gregg
Harper
(R)
112th (2011–2013) Alan
Nunnelee
(R)
Steven Palazzo (R)
113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
Trent Kelly (R)
115th (2017–2019)
116th (2019–2021) Michael
Guest
(R)
117th (2021–2023)

Key

Democratic (D)
Democratic-Republican (DR)
Jacksonian (J)
Know Nothing (KN)
National Republican (NR)
Republican (R)
Unionist (U)
Whig (W)
Independent (I)

See also

References

  1. ^ Supported the Jackson faction in the 1824 United States presidential election.
  2. ^ a b Claibourne's and Gholson's elections in 1836 were contested due to election irregularities. The House set aside both contests, and vacated both seats February 5, 1838.
  3. ^ a b c d William Barksdale, Reuben Davis, Otho Robards Singleton and John Jones McRae all resigned on January 12, 1861 upon Mississippi's secession.
  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
This page was last edited on 18 April 2022, at 05:50
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