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1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

← 1990 November 8, 1992 1994 →

All 30 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 19 8
Seats won 21 9
Seat change Increase2 Increase1
Popular vote 2,806,044 2,685,973
Percentage 49.9% 47.8%
Swing Decrease3.9% Increase2.1%

1992 Texas US House.svg

The 1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas occurred on November 8, 1992, to elect the members of the state of Texas's delegation to the United States House of Representatives. Texas had thirty seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census.[1] The Texas Legislature enacted new congressional districts in line with this apportionment during a special session in 1991.[2]

These elections occurred simultaneously with the United States Senate elections of 1992, the United States House elections in other states, the presidential election, and various state and local elections. As of 2020, this is the last time the Democratic Party won the popular vote in Texas's U.S. House races, though Democrats would continue to hold a majority of House seats until 2004.

Overview

1992 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas[3]
Party Votes Percentage Seats before Seats after +/–
Democratic 2,806,044 49.91% 19 21 +2
Republican 2,685,973 47.77% 8 9 +1
Libertarian 110,832 1.97% 0 0 -
Independent 19,623 0.35% 0 0 -
Totals 5,622,472 100.00% 27 30 +3

Congressional Districts

District 1

Incumbent Democrat Jim Chapman ran for re-election unopposed.

Texas's 1st congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Chapman (incumbent) 152,209 100.00
Total votes 152,209 100
Democratic hold

District 2

Incumbent Democrat Charlie Wilson ran for re-election.

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charlie Wilson (incumbent) 118,625 56.13
Republican Donna Peterson 92,176 43.61
Write-in Roger Northen 549 0.26
Total votes 211,350 100
Democratic hold

District 3

Incumbent Republican Steve Bartlett resigned in 1991 after he was elected Mayor of Dallas.[4] This prompted a special election to be held, which fellow Republican Sam Johnson won in a runoff.[5] He ran for re-election.

Texas's 3rd congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 201,569 86.09
Libertarian Noel Kopala 32,570 13.91
Total votes 234,139 100
Republican hold

District 4

Incumbent Democrat Ralph Hall ran for re-election.

Texas's 4th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ralph M. Hall (incumbent) 128,008 58.10
Republican David Bridges 83,875 38.07
Libertarian Steven Rothacker 8,450 3.84
Total votes 220,333 100
Democratic hold

District 5

Incumbent Democrat John Wiley Bryant ran for re-election.

Texas's 5th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Wiley Bryant (incumbent) 98,567 58.91
Republican Richard Stokley 62,419 37.30
Libertarian William Walker 6,344 3.79
Total votes 167,330 100
Democratic hold

District 6

Incumbent Republican Joe Barton ran for re-election.

Texas's 6th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 189,140 71.90
Democratic John Dietrich 73,933 28.10
Total votes 263,073 100
Republican hold

District 7

Incumbent Republican Bill Archer ran for re-election unopposed.

Texas's 7th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Archer (incumbent) 169,407 100.00
Total votes 169,407 100
Republican hold

District 8

Incumbent Republican Jack Fields ran for re-election.

Texas's 8th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Fields (incumbent) 179,349 77.03
Democratic Chas. Robinson 53,473 22.97
Total votes 232,822 100
Republican hold

District 9

Incumbent Democrat Jack Brooks ran for re-election.

Texas's 9th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jack Brooks (incumbent) 118,690 53.62
Republican Steve Stockman 96,270 43.49
Libertarian Billy Joe Crawford 6,401 2.89
Total votes 221,361 100
Democratic hold

District 10

Incumbent Democrat J. J. Pickle ran for re-election.

Texas's 10th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic J. J. Pickle (incumbent) 177,233 67.67
Republican Herbert Spiro 68,646 26.21
Libertarian Terry Blum 6,353 2.43
Independent Jeff Davis 6,056 2.31
Write-in Stephen Hopkins 3,510 1.34
Write-in Robert Shaw 94 0.04
Total votes 261,892 100
Democratic hold

District 11

Incumbent Democrat Chet Edwards ran for re-election.

Texas's 11th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chet Edwards (incumbent) 119,999 67.40
Republican James Broyles 58,033 32.60
Total votes 178,032 100
Democratic hold

District 12

Incumbent Democrat Pete Geren ran for re-election.

Texas's 12th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Geren (incumbent) 125,492 62.77
Republican David Hobbs 74,432 37.23
Total votes 199,924 100
Democratic hold

District 13

Incumbent Democrat Bill Sarpalius ran for re-election. Beau Boulter, who held the seat until 1989, ran against him.

Texas's 13th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Sarpalius (incumbent) 117,892 60.33
Republican Beau Boulter 77,514 39.67
Total votes 195,406 100
Democratic hold

District 14

Incumbent Democrat Greg Laughlin ran for re-election.

Texas's 14th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Laughlin (incumbent) 135,930 68.08
Republican Bert Garza 54,412 27.25
Independent Vic Vreeland 9,329 4.67
Total votes 199,671 100
Democratic hold

District 15

Incumbent Democrat Kika de la Garza ran for re-election.

Texas's 15th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kika de la Garza (incumbent) 86,351 60.43
Republican Tom Haughey 56,549 39.57
Total votes 142,900 100
Democratic hold

District 16

Incumbent Democrat Ronald D. Coleman ran for re-election.

Texas's 16th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald D. Coleman (incumbent) 66,731 51.89
Republican Chip Taberski 61,870 48.11
Total votes 128,601 100
Democratic hold

District 17

Incumbent Democrat Charles Stenholm ran for re-election.

Texas's 17th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charles Stenholm (incumbent) 136,213 66.07
Republican Jeannie Sadowski 69,958 33.93
Total votes 206,171 100
Democratic hold

District 18

Incumbent Democrat Craig Washington ran for re-election. The district was intentionally drawn to have an African-American majority population, but the methods used to draw this district would be found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court case Bush v. Vera in 1996.[6]

Texas's 18th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Craig Washington (incumbent) 111,422 64.70
Republican Edward Blum 56,080 32.57
Libertarian Gregg Lassen 4,706 2.73
Total votes 172,208 100
Democratic hold

District 19

Incumbent Republican Larry Combest ran for re-election.

Texas's 19th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Combest (incumbent) 162,057 77.40
Democratic Terry Lee Moser 47,325 22.60
Total votes 209,382 100
Republican hold

District 20

Incumbent Democrat Henry B. González ran for re-election unopposed.

Texas's 20th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry B. Gonzalez (incumbent) 103,755 100.00
Total votes 103,755 100
Democratic hold

District 21

Incumbent Republican Lamar Smith ran for re-election.

Texas's 21st congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 190,979 72.16
Democratic James Gaddy 62,827 23.74
Libertarian William Grisham 10,847 4.10
Total votes 264,653 100
Republican hold

District 22

Incumbent Republican Tom DeLay ran for re-election.

Texas's 22nd congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom DeLay (incumbent) 150,221 68.90
Democratic Richard Konrad 67,812 31.10
Total votes 218,033 100
Republican hold

District 23

Incumbent Democrat Albert Bustamante ran for re-election.

Texas's 23rd congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Henry Bonilla 98,259 59.07
Democratic Albert Bustamante (incumbent) 63,797 38.35
Libertarian David Alter 4,291 2.58
Total votes 166,347 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

District 24

Incumbent Democrat Martin Frost ran for re-election.

Texas's 24th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martin Frost (incumbent) 104,174 59.80
Republican Steve Masterson 70,042 40.20
Total votes 174,216 100
Democratic hold

District 25

Incumbent Democrat Michael A. Andrews ran for re-election.

Texas's 25th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael A. Andrews (incumbent) 98,975 55.96
Republican Dolly Madison McKenna 73,192 41.38
Libertarian Richard Mauk 4,710 2.66
Total votes 176,877 100
Democratic hold

District 26

Incumbent Republican Dick Armey ran for re-election.

Texas's 26th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dick Armey (incumbent) 150,209 73.08
Democratic John Wayne Caton 55,237 26.88
Write-in Steve Love 85 0.04
Total votes 205,531 100
Republican hold

District 27

Incumbent Democrat Solomon Ortiz ran for re-election.

Texas's 27th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Solomon Ortiz (incumbent) 87,022 55.48
Republican Jay Kimbrough 66,853 42.62
Libertarian Charles Henry Schoonover 2,969 1.89
Total votes 156,844 100
Democratic hold

District 28

District 28 was created as a result of redistricting after the 1990 census.

Texas's 28th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Tejeda 122,457 87.11
Libertarian David Slatter 18,128 12.89
Total votes 140,585 100
Democratic win (new seat)

District 29

District 29 was created as a result of redistricting after the 1990 census. The district was intentionally drawn to have a Hispanic majority population, but the methods used to draw this district would be found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court case Bush v. Vera in 1996.[6]

Texas's 29th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green 64,064 64.93
Republican Clark Kent Ervin 34,609 35.07
Total votes 98,673 100
Democratic win (new seat)

District 30

Outline of Texas' 30th Congressional District in 1992.
Outline of Texas' 30th Congressional District in 1992.

District 30 was created as a result of redistricting after the 1990 census. The district was intentionally drawn to have an African-American majority population, but the methods used to draw this district would be found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court case Bush v. Vera in 1996.[6] State Senator Eddie Bernice Johnson, the first African American woman ever elected to public office from Dallas, ran in the open race.[7]

Texas's 30th congressional district, 1992[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson 107,831 71.53
Republican Lucy Cain 37,853 25.11
Libertarian Ken Ashby 5,063 3.36
Total votes 150,747 100
Democratic win (new seat)


References

  1. ^ Bureau, US Census. "1990 Census Apportionment Results". Census.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-14.
  2. ^ "History". redistricting.capitol.texas.gov. Retrieved 2022-06-17.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "1992 General Election". elections.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved 2022-06-16.
  4. ^ "Inaugural Speech of Mayor Steve Bartlett and Farewell Address of Mayor Annette Strauss, 1991". dallascityhall.com. Retrieved 2022-06-17.
  5. ^ "CQ Politics in America Profile: Sam Johnson" (PDF). Congressional Quarterly. May 7, 2013. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c "Bush v. Vera, 517 U.S. 952 (1996)". Justia Law. Retrieved 2022-06-16.
  7. ^ "Eddie Bernice Johnson (1935- ) •". 2017-10-07. Retrieved 2022-06-16.
This page was last edited on 28 June 2022, at 04:06
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