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Texas's 2nd congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Texas's 2nd congressional district
Texas US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
Texas's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
U.S. Representative
  Dan Crenshaw
RHouston
Distribution
  • 98.11[1]% urban
  • 1.89% rural
Population (2016)779,662[2]
Median income$77,519[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+11[4]

Texas's 2nd congressional district of the United States House of Representatives is in the southeastern portion of the state of Texas. It encompasses much of northern and western Houston.

From 2002 to 2012 it stretched from Houston's northern suburbs through eastern Harris County, and across Southeast Texas to the Louisiana border. As of the 2000 census, District 2 represented 651,619 people. The district's configuration dates from the 2003 Texas redistricting, when most of the old 9th District was split among three neighboring districts. The four-term Democratic incumbent in the 9th District, Nick Lampson, was unseated by Republican Ted Poe, a longtime felony court judge in Harris County. In November 2017, Poe announced that he would retire from Congress at the end of his current term, and did not seek re-election in 2018.[5][6] Dan Crenshaw was elected on November 6th and is currently serving as congressman.

2012 redistricting

The 2012 redistricting process radically changed the district. Beaumont, which had been part of the 2nd and its predecessors for over a century, was removed along with all of Jefferson County. All of Liberty County was removed as well, putting the district entirely within Harris County. The district now includes Kingwood, Humble, and Atascocita in northeastern Harris County, then loops around northern and western Houston before moving toward the center of the city roughly following Interstate 10. The district will pass through Memorial Park, before turning south and capturing the strongly Democratic Montrose, Rice University, and parts of Braeswood.[7]

Recent election results from presidential races

Year Results
2000 Bush 63 - 37%
2004 Bush 63 - 36%
2008 McCain 60 - 40%
2012 Romney 63 - 36%
2016 Trump 52 - 43%

List of members representing the district

The district was formed December 29, 1845, after Texas joined the Union.

Name Party Years Electoral history Counties represented[8]
Vacant December 29, 1845 –
March 30, 1846
Timothy Pilsbury Democratic March 30, 1846 –
March 3, 1849
Elected in 1846.
Re-elected November 2, 1846.
Lost re-election.
Bexar, Milam, Robertson, Travis, Brazos, Montgomery, Washington, Bastrop, Gonzales, Fayette, Austin, Harris, Colorado, Fort Bend, Brazoria, Galveston, Goliad, Jackson, Victoria, Refugio, San Patricio
Volney E. Howard Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Elected late August 6, 1849.
Re-elected late August 4, 1851.
Lost re-election.
El Paso, Presidio, Bexar, Mclennan, Navarro, Tarrant, Ellis, Bell, Freestone, Limestone, Falls, Travis, Gillespie, Leon, Robertson, Milam, Williamson, Hays, Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, Kinney, Burleson, Brazos, Grimes, Walker, Montgomery, Washington, Bastrop, Caldwell, Guadalupe, Harris, Austin, Galveston, Brazoria, Matagorda, Wharton, Colorado, Fayette, Gonzales, De Witt, Lavaca, Jackson, Calhoun, Victoria, Goliad, Refugio, San Patricio, Nueces, Webb, Starr, Cameron
Peter bell.png

Peter H. Bell
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1857
Elected late August 1, 1853.
Re-elected late August 6, 1855.
Lost re-election.
Guy M. Bryan (Texas Congressman).jpg

Guy M. Bryan
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Elected late August 3, 1857.
Retired.
Andrew Jackson Hamilton.jpg

Andrew J. Hamilton
Independent Democratic March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Elected late August 1, 1859.
Retired.
Bexar, Milam, Robertson, Travis, Brazos, Montgomery, Washington, Bastrop, Gonzales, Fayette, Austin, Harris, Colorado, Fort Bend, Brazoria, Galveston, Goliad, Jackson, Victoria, Refugio, San Patricio
American Civil War/Reconstruction March 3, 1861 –
March 31, 1870
John C. Conner Democratic March 31, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
Elected to finish vacant term.
Re-elected late October 6, 1871.
Retired because of failing health.
[Data unknown/missing.]
William mcLean.jpg

William P. McLean
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Elected in 1872.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
D.B. Culberson.jpg

David B. Culberson
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1881
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878
Fannin, Lamar, Delta, Red River, Bowie, Hunt, Rains, Hopkins, Titus, Cass, Wood, Upshur, Marion, Van Zandt, Gregg, Harrison
March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Redistricted to the 4th district.
Henderson, Anderson, Freestone, Cherokee, Robertson, Leon, Houston, Nacogdoches, San Augustine, Sabine
JHRegan.jpg

 John H. Reagan
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
Redistricted from the 1st district.
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886, but resigned when elected to the U.S. Senate
Vacant March 4, 1887 –
November 4, 1887
William H. Martin Democratic November 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1891
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Benjamin Long Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Elected in 1890.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Samuel B. Cooper.jpeg

Samuel B. Cooper
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1905
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Lost re-election.
Harrison, Panola, Shelby, Anderson, Cherokee, Nacogdoches, Houston, San Augustine, Sabine, Polk, Tyler, Jasper, Newton, San Jacinto, Liberty, Hardin, Orange, Jefferson
Moses L. Broocks Democratic March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
Elected in 1904.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
Samuel B. Cooper.jpeg

Samuel B. Cooper
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1909
Elected in 1906.
Lost re-election.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Martin Dies, Sr. Democratic March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1919
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
John C. Box Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1931
Elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
370403-Dies-Martin.jpg

Martin Dies Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
January 3, 1945
Elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Retired.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Jesse M. Combs Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1953
Elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
Jack Brooks.jpg

Jack Brooks
Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1967
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
[Data unknown/missing.]
John Dowdy.jpg

John Dowdy
Democratic January 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1973
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Retired.
[Data unknown/missing.]
CharlieWilson.jpg

Charles Wilson
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1997
Elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
Jim Turner.jpg

Jim Turner
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2005
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
[Data unknown/missing.]
[Data unknown/missing.]
Ted Poe Official.jpg

Ted Poe
Republican January 3, 2005 –
January 3, 2019
Elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Dan Crenshaw, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg

Dan Crenshaw
Republican January 3, 2019 –
Present
Elected in 2018. [Data unknown/missing.]

Election results

US House election, 2004: Texas District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ted Poe 139,951 55.5 +17.3
Democratic Nick Lampson 108,156 42.9 -17.9
Libertarian Sandra Saulsbury 3,931 1.6 +0.6
Majority 31,795 12.6
Turnout 252,038
Republican gain from Democratic Swing +17.6

Last Election

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Crenshaw 139,188 52.8
Democratic Todd Litton 119,992 45.6
Libertarian Patrick Gunnels 2,373 0.9
Independent Scott Cubbler 1,839 0.7
Total votes 263,392 100.0
Republican hold


Historical district boundaries

2007–2013
2007–2013

See also

References

  1. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov.
  2. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=48&cd=02
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Poe, Ted [@JudgeTedPoe] (November 7, 2017). "Dear Neighbors" (Tweet). Retrieved November 7, 2017 – via Twitter.
  6. ^ Marcos, Christina (November 7, 2017). "Texas GOP lawmaker won't seek reelection". The Hill. Washington, D.C. Retrieved November 7, 2017.
  7. ^ "DistrictViewer - Texas Legislative Council". gis1.tlc.state.tx.us.
  8. ^ "Texas Redistricting". www.tlc.texas.gov.

This page was last edited on 24 March 2019, at 21:35
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