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Texas's 21st congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Texas's 21st congressional district
Texas US Congressional District 21 (since 2013).tif
Texas's 21st congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Chip Roy
RAustin
Distribution
  • 78.15% urban[1]
  • 21.85% rural
Population (2019)829,628[2]
Median household
income
$73,472[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+5[3]

Texas's 21st congressional district of the United States House of Representatives serves the area north of San Antonio and a significant portion of Austin in the state of Texas. Towns entirely or partially in this district include Boerne, Fredericksburg, Ingram, Kerrville, Kyle, New Braunfels, and San Marcos. The current Representative from the 21st district is Chip Roy.

Demographics

According to the APM Research Lab's Voter Profile Tools[4] (featuring the U.S. Census Bureau's 2019 American Community Survey), the district contained about 628,000 potential voters (citizens, age 18+). Of these, 65% are White and 26% are Latino. Immigrants make up 4% of the district's potential voters. Median income among households (with one or more potential voter) in the district is about $75,100, while 9% of households live below the poverty line. As for the educational attainment of potential voters in the district, 44% hold a bachelor's or higher degree.

Election results from statewide races

Year U.S. President U.S. Senator Governor
2000 Bush (R) 74 - 24%
2004 Bush (R) 66 – 34%
2008 McCain (R): 56 – 42% [Data unknown/missing]
2012 Romney (R): 59.8 – 37.9% Cruz (R): 58 – 37%
2016 Trump (R): 52.5 – 42.5%
2018 Cruz (R): 49.6 – 49.5% Abbott (R): 55 – 43%
2020 Trump (R): 51 – 48%

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created January 3, 1935
Charles L. South Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1943
74th
75th
76th
77th
[data unknown/missing]
O. C. Fisher.jpg

O. C. Fisher
Democratic January 3, 1943 –
December 31, 1974
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
Vacant December 31, 1974 –
January 3, 1975
93rd
Rep Bob Krueger.jpg

Bob Krueger
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1979
94th
95th
[data unknown/missing]
Tom Loeffler.jpg

Tom Loeffler
Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1987
96th
97th
98th
99th
[data unknown/missing]
Lamar Smith, Official Portrait, c112th Congress.jpg

Lamar Smith
Republican January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 2019
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
Chip Roy, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg

Chip Roy
Republican January 3, 2019 –
present
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election results

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 209,774 61.5% -11.4%
Democratic Rhett Smith 121,129 35.5% +10.2%
Libertarian Jason Pratt 10,216 3.0% +1.1%
Majority 88,645 26.0%
Turnout 341,119
Republican hold Swing -10.8%

2006

In the case of League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry, 548 U. S. 399 (2006), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the configuration of Texas' 15th, 21st, 23rd, 25th and 28th congressional districts as drawn by the Texas Legislature violated the National Voting Rights Act of 1965. Replacement district boundaries for the 2006 election were subsequently issued for the five districts by the local federal district court, and on election day in November, these five districts had open primaries, with a candidate being elected if he or she received over 50 percent of the vote, and runoff elections in December to decide elections in which no candidate gained an absolute majority in November.[5]

In the 2006 election, Lamar Smith defeated veteran and college administrator John Courage with 60% of the vote.

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 122,486 60.1% -1.4%
Democratic John Courage 49,957 24.51% -10.99%
Democratic Gene Kelly 18,355 9%
Independent Tommy Ray Calvert Jr 5,280 2.59%
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 4,076 2.0% -1.0%
Independent James Lyle Peterson 2,189 1.07%
Independent Mark J. Rossano 1,439 0.7%
Majority
Turnout 203,782
Republican hold Swing

2008

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 243,471 79.99% +19.89%
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 60,879 20% +18%
Majority 182,592
Turnout 304,350
Republican hold Swing

2010

In the 2010 election, Lamar Smith defeated Lainey Melnick with 68.9 percent of the vote. Melnick, an Austin real estate broker, officially filed papers with the Federal Election Commission on June 23, 2009 to become a candidate.

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 169,924 68.9% -11.09%
Democratic Lainey Melnick 65,834 27.9% +3.39%
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 7,687 3.3% -16.7%
Majority 96929
Turnout 236,284
Republican hold Swing

2012

Incumbent Lamar Smith faced five challengers in the 2012 general election on November 6, 2012: Candace Duval (Dem), John-Henry Liberty (Lib), Fidel Castillo (Grn), Bill Stout (Grn), and Carlos Pena (Ind). [6]

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 187,015 60.55%
Democratic Candace E. Duval 109,326 35.40%
Libertarian John-Henry Liberty 12,524 4.05%
Total votes 308,865 100.0%

2014

2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 135,513 71.80%
Libertarian Ryan Shields 25,483 13.50%
Green Antonio Diaz 27,782 14.70%
Total votes 188,778 100.0%

2016

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 202,523 57.00%
Democratic Tom Wakely 129,253 36.40%
Libertarian Mark Loewe 14,698 4.10%
Green Tony Diaz 8,520 2.40%
Total votes 354,994 100.0%

2018

Lamar Smith did not run for reelection in 2018.[7]

On the Republican side, 18 candidates competed in the March 6 primary, in which no one received a majority. The first- and second-place finishers were, respectively, attorney Chip Roy, who served as chief of staff to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and senior advisor to Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R),[8] and Matt McCall, owner of a business providing human tissue for American military hospitals. Roy and McCall advanced to a May 22 runoff, which Roy won with 52.7% of the vote.[9]

On the Democratic side, four candidates ran to replace Smith: Joseph Kopser, entrepreneur and Army veteran; Derrick Crowe, activist; Elliott McFadden, executive director of Austin B-cycle; and Mary Street Wilson, pastor.[10] No one received a majority in the March 6 primary,[11] so the top two finishers, Wilson and Kopser, advanced to a runoff on May 22. Kopser flipped the primary result in the runoff against Wilson, winning the nomination with 58% of the vote.[12]

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy 176,913 50.3%
Democratic Joseph Kopser 167,020 47.5%
Libertarian Lee Santos 7,497 2.1%
Total votes 351,430 100.0%

2020

The incumbent, Chip Roy, was unopposed for the Republican nomination. Former state Senator Wendy Davis won the Democratic primary runoff.[13] Tom Wakely was nominated by the Green Party caucus. The state Supreme Court insured his inclusion after Wendy Davis tried unsuccessfully to have him removed from the ballot.[14] Perennial candidate Arthur DiBianca is the Libertarian nominee,[15] but Roy joined a last-minute suit to strike his name and other similarly situated Libertarians from the ballot.[16]

Primary results

Democratic primary results [13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Wendy Davis 84,593 86.3
Democratic Jennie Lou Leeder 13,485 13.7
Total votes 98,078 100.0

General election

Texas's 21st congressional district, 2020[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy (incumbent) 235,740 52.0
Democratic Wendy Davis 205,780 45.3
Libertarian Arthur DiBlanca 8,666 1.9
Green Tom Wakely 3,564 0.8
Total votes 453,750 100.0
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

2007 – 2013
2007 – 2013
2005 – 2007
2005 – 2007

See also

References

  1. ^ "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (State-based)". www.census.gov. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "Representing US: 2020 Voter Profiles". APM Research Lab. Retrieved October 22, 2020.
  5. ^ Austin American-Statesman accessed 4 August 2006; link broken 18 October 2006
  6. ^ "Texas' 21st Congressional District elections, 2012". ballotpedia.org. Retrieved September 14, 2012.
  7. ^ Dixon, Darius (November 2, 2017). "Lamar Smith won't seek reelection to House". Politico. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  8. ^ Alberta, Tim (October 23, 2018). "Meet the Next Ted Cruz". Politico.
  9. ^ Price, Asher (May 23, 2018). "Joseph Kopser to face Chip Roy in 21st Congressional District matchup". Statesman. USA Today Network.
  10. ^ "Who's on the Texas primary ballots in 2018?". apps.texastribune.org. January 24, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  11. ^ "Important 2018 Election dates". www.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  12. ^ "Texas Primary Runoff Election Results: 21st House District". The New York Times. May 29, 2018. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  13. ^ a b "The latest fundraising ahead of the next huge primary night". Politico. June 12, 2020. Retrieved August 28, 2020.
  14. ^ Texas court allows Green Party candidates on the ballot , Express News, Gilbert Garcia, August 21, 2020. Retrieved August 28, 2020.
  15. ^ Arthur DiBianca, Ballotpedia. Retrieved August 28, 2020,
  16. ^ Republicans File Appeal to Texas Supreme Court to Remove Libertarian Candidates from Ballot, TheTexan, Brad Johnson, August 28, 2020. Retrieved August 28, 2020.
  17. ^ "Texas Election Results - Official Results". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved November 26, 2020.

This page was last edited on 24 July 2021, at 04:23
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