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Texas's 21st congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Texas's 21st congressional district
Texas US Congressional District 21 (since 2013).tif
Texas's 21st congressional district – since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Chip Roy
RAustin
Distribution
  • 78.15[1]% urban
  • 21.85% rural
Population (2016)804,470[2]
Median income$71,486[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+10[4]

Texas's 21st congressional district of the United States House of Representatives serves the area north of San Antonio and a significant portion of Austin in the state of Texas. The current Representative from District 21 is Chip Roy.

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Transcription

Contents

Election results from presidential races

Year Result
2004 George W. Bush 66 – 34%
2008 John McCain 56 – 42%
2012 Mitt Romney 59.8 – 37.9%
2016 Donald Trump 52.5 – 42.5%

List of representatives

Representative Party Years Note
District created January 3, 1935
No image.svg
Charles L. South
Democratic January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1943
O. C. Fisher.jpg
O. C. Fisher
Democratic January 3, 1943 – December 31, 1974 Retired
Vacant December 31, 1974 – January 3, 1975
Bob Krueger.jpg
Bob Krueger
Democratic January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1979
Tom Loeffler.jpg
Tom Loeffler
Republican January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1987
Lamar Smith, Official Portrait, c112th Congress.jpg
Lamar Smith
Republican January 3, 1987 – January 3, 2019 Retired
Chip Roy, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Chip Roy
Republican January 3, 2019 – present Incumbent

Elections

2006

In the case of League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry, 548 U. S. 399 (2006), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the configuration of Texas' 15th, 21st, 23rd, 25th and 28th congressional districts as drawn by the Texas Legislature violated the National Voting Rights Act of 1965. Replacement district boundaries for 2006 election were subsequently issued for the five districts by the local federal district court, and on election day in November, these five districts had open primaries, with a candidate being elected if he or she received over 50 percent of the vote, and runoff elections in December to decide elections in which no candidate gained an absolute majority in November.[5]

In the 2006 election, Lamar Smith defeated veteran and college administrator John Courage with 60% of the vote.

2010

In the 2010 election, Lamar Smith defeated Lainey Melnick with 68.9 percent of the vote. Melnick, an Austin real estate broker, officially filed papers with the Federal Election Commission on June 23, 2009 to become a candidate.

2012

Incumbent Lamar Smith faced five challengers in the 2012 general election on November 6, 2012: Candace Duval (Dem), John-Henry Liberty (Lib), Fidel Castillo (Grn), Bill Stout (Grn), and Carlos Pena (Ind). [6]

2018

Lamar Smith did not run for reelection in 2018.[7]

On the Republican side of the ticket, Attorney Chip Roy (R) served as chief of staff to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and senior advisor to Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R).[8].

On the Democratic side, four candidates ran to replace him: Joseph Kopser, entrepreneur and Army veteran; Derrick Crowe, activist; Elliott McFadden, Executive Director of Austin B-cycle; and Mary Wilson, pastor.[9] The primary election took place on March 6, 2018.[10] After a runoff against Mary Street Wilson, Joseph Kopser won the May 22, 2018 Democratic primary with 58% of the vote.[11]

Election results

US House election, 2018: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Roy 176,913 50.3
Democratic Joseph Kopser 167,020 47.5
Libertarian Lee Santos 7,497 2.1
Total votes 351,430 100.0
US House election, 2016: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 202,523 57.00
Democratic Tom Wakely 129,253 36.40
Libertarian Mark Loewe 14,698 4.10
Green Tony Diaz 8,520 2.40
Total votes 354,994 100.0
US House election, 2014: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 135,513 71.80
Libertarian Ryan Shields 25,483 13.50
Green Antonio Diaz 27,782 14.70
Total votes 188,778 100.0
US House election, 2012: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (Incumbent) 187,015 60.55
Democratic Candace E. Duval 109,326 35.40
Libertarian John-Henry Liberty 12,524 4.05
Total votes 308,865 100.0
US House election, 2010: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Lamar Smith 169,924 68.9 -11.09
Democratic Lainey Melnick 65,834 27.9 +3.39
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 7,687 3.3 -16.7
Majority 96929
Turnout 236,284
Republican hold Swing
US House election, 2008: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Lamar Smith 243,471 79.99 +19.89
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 60,879 20 +18
Majority 182,592
Turnout 304,350
Republican hold Swing
US House election, 2006: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Lamar Smith 122,486 60.1 -1.4
Democratic John Courage 49,957 24.51 -10.99
Democratic Gene Kelly 18,355 9
Independent Tommy Ray Calvert Jr 5,280 2.59
Libertarian James Arthur Strohm 4,076 2.0 -1.0
Independent James Lyle Peterson 2,189 1.07
Independent Mark J. Rossano 1,439 0.7
Majority
Turnout 203,782
Republican hold Swing
US House election, 2004: Texas District 21
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Lamar Smith 209,774 61.5 -11.4
Democratic Rhett Smith 121,129 35.5 +10.2
Libertarian Jason Pratt 10,216 3.0 +1.1
Majority 88,645 26.0
Turnout 341,119
Republican hold Swing -10.8

Historical district boundaries

2007 – 2013
2007 – 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (State-based)". www.census.gov. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  2. ^ "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved February 8, 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=48&cd=21
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Austin American-Statesman[permanent dead link] accessed 4 August 2006; link broken 18 October 2006
  6. ^ "Texas' 21st Congressional District elections, 2012". ballotpedia.org. Retrieved September 14, 2012.
  7. ^ "Lamar Smith won't seek reelection to House". www.politico.com. November 2, 2017. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  8. ^ "Meet the Next Ted Cruz". www.politico.com. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  9. ^ "Who's on the Texas primary ballots in 2018?". apps.texastribune.org. January 24, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  10. ^ "Important 2018 Election dates". www.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  11. ^ "Texas Primary Runoff Election Results: 21st House District". Retrieved July 26, 2018.

This page was last edited on 15 June 2019, at 02:20
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