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2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2014

← 2012 November 4, 2014 2016 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
Turnout25%
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Republican Democratic Libertarian
Seats before 24 12 0
Seats won 25 11 0
Seat change Increase1 Decrease1 Steady
Popular vote 2,684,592 1,474,016 225,178
Percentage 60.28% 33.10% 5.06%
Swing Increase2.49% Decrease5.39% Increase1.84%

2014 Texas US House.svg

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the state of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a gubernatorial election and an election to the U.S. Senate.

With 25% of voting age people turning out, all seats except for that of district 23 were retained by their respective parties, with the Republican Party receiving 25 seats and the Democratic Party receiving 11 seats.

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Transcription

Hi, I'm Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we're going to talk about what is, if you ask the general public, the most important part of politics: elections. If you ask me, it's hair styles. Look at Martin Van Buren's sideburns, how could he not be elected? Americans are kind of obsessed with elections, I mean when this was being recorded in early 2015, television, news and the internet were already talking about who would be Democrat and Republican candidates for president in 2016. And many of the candidates have unofficially been campaigning for years. I've been campaigning; your grandma's been campaigning. Presidential elections are exciting and you can gamble on them. Is that legal, can you gamble on them, Stan? Anyway, why we're so obsessed with them is a topic for another day. Right now I'm gonna tell you that the fixation on the presidential elections is wrong, but not because the president doesn't matter. No, today we're gonna look at the elections of the people that are supposed to matter the most, Congress. Constitutionally at least, Congress is the most important branch of government because it is the one that is supposed to be the most responsive to the people. One of the main reasons it's so responsive, at least in theory, is the frequency of elections. If a politician has to run for office often, he or she, because unlike the president we have women serving in Congress, kind of has to pay attention to what the constituents want, a little bit, maybe. By now, I'm sure that most of you have memorized the Constitution, so you recognize that despite their importance in the way we discuss politics, elections aren't really a big feature of the Constitution. Except of course for the ridiculously complex electoral college system for choosing the president, which we don't even want to think about for a few episodes. In fact, here's what the Constitution says about Congressional Elections in Article 1 Section 2: "The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature." So the Constitution does establish that the whole of the house is up for election every 2 years, and 1/3 of the senate is too, but mainly it leaves the scheduling and rules of elections up to the states. The actual rules of elections, like when the polls are open and where they actually are, as well as the registration requirements, are pretty much up to the states, subject to some federal election law. If you really want to know the rules in your state, I'm sure that someone at the Board of Elections, will be happy to explain them to you. Really, you should give them a call; they're very, very lonely. In general though, here's what we can say about American elections. First stating the super obvious, in order to serve in congress, you need to win an election. In the House of Representatives, each election district chooses a single representative, which is why we call them single-member districts. The number of districts is determined by the Census, which happens every 10 years, and which means that elections ending in zeros are super important, for reasons that I'll explain in greater detail in a future episode. It's because of gerrymandering. The Senate is much easier to figure out because both of the state Senators are elected by the entire state. It's as if the state itself were a single district, which is true for states like Wyoming, which are so unpopulated as to have only 1 representative. Sometimes these elections are called at large elections. Before the election ever happens, you need candidates. How candidates are chosen differs from state to state, but usually it has something to do with political parties, although it doesn't have to. Why are things so complicated?! What we can say is that candidates, or at least good candidates, usually have certain characteristics. Sorry America. First off, if you are gonna run for office, you should have an unblemished record, free of, oh I don't know, felony convictions or sex scandals, except maybe in Louisiana or New York. This might lead to some pretty bland candidates or people who are so calculating that they have no skeletons in their closet, but we Americans are a moral people and like our candidates to reflect our ideals rather than our reality. The second characteristic that a candidate must possess is the ability to raise money. Now some candidates are billionaires and can finance their own campaigns. But most billionaires have better things to do: buying yachts, making even more money, building money forts, buying more yachts, so they don't have time to run for office. But most candidates get their money for their campaigns by asking for it. The ability to raise money is key, especially now, because running for office is expensive. Can I get a how expensive is it? "How expensive is it?!" Well, so expensive that the prices of elections continually rises and in 2012 winners of House races spent nearly 2 million each. Senate winners spent more than 10 million. By the time this episode airs, I'm sure the numbers will be much higher like a gajillion billion million. Money is important in winning an election, but even more important, statistically, is already being in Congress. Let's go to the Thought Bubble. The person holding an office who runs for that office again is called the incumbent and has a big advantage over any challenger. This is according to political scientists who, being almost as bad at naming things as historians, refer to this as incumbency advantage. There are a number of reasons why incumbents tend to hold onto their seats in congress, if they want to. The first is that a sitting congressman has a record to run on, which we hope includes some legislative accomplishments, although for the past few Congresses, these don't seem to matter. The record might include case work, which is providing direct services to constituents. This is usually done by congressional staffers and includes things like answering questions about how to get certain government benefits or writing recommendation letters to West Point. Congressmen can also provide jobs to constituents, which is usually a good way to get them to vote for you. These are either government jobs, kind of rare these days, called patronage or indirect employment through government contracts for programs within a Congressman's district. These programs are called earmarks or pork barrel programs, and they are much less common now because Congress has decided not to use them any more, sort of. The second advantage that incumbents have is that they have a record of winning elections, which if you think about it, is pretty obvious. Being a proven winner makes it easier for a congressmen to raise money, which helps them win, and long term incumbents tend to be more powerful in Congress which makes it even easier for them to raise money and win. The Constitution give incumbents one structural advantage too. Each elected congressman is allowed $100,000 and free postage to send out election materials. This is called the franking privilege. It's not so clear how great an advantage this is in the age of the internet, but at least according to the book The Victory Lab, direct mail from candidates can be surprisingly effective. How real is this incumbency advantage? Well if you look at the numbers, it seems pretty darn real. Over the past 60 years, almost 90% of members of The House of Representatives got re-elected. The Senate has been even more volatile, but even at the low point in 1980 more than 50% of sitting senators got to keep their jobs. Thanks, Thought Bubble. You're so great. So those are some of the features of congressional elections. Now, if you'll permit me to get a little politically sciencey, I'd like to try to explain why elections are so important to the way that Congressmen and Senators do their jobs. In 1974, political scientist David Mayhew published a book in which he described something he called "The Electoral Connection." This was the idea that Congressmen were primarily motivated by the desire to get re-elected, which intuitively makes a lot of sense, even though I'm not sure what evidence he had for this conclusion. Used to be able to get away with that kind of thing I guess, clearly David may-not-hew to the rules of evidence, pun [rim shot], high five, no. Anyway Mayhew's research methodology isn't as important as his idea itself because The Electoral Connection provides a frame work for understanding congressman's activities. Mayhew divided representatives' behaviors and activities into three categories. The first is advertising; congressmen work to develop their personal brand so that they are recognizable to voters. Al D'Amato used to be know in New York as Senator Pothole, because he was able to bring home so much pork that he could actually fix New York's streets. Not by filling them with pork, money, its money, remember pork barrel spending? The second activity is credit claiming; Congressmen get things done so that they can say they got them done. A lot of case work and especially pork barrel spending are done in the name of credit claiming. Related to credit claiming, but slightly different, is position taking. This means making a public judgmental statement on something likely to be of interest to voters. Senators can do this through filibusters. Representatives can't filibuster, but they can hold hearings, publicly supporting a hearing is a way of associating yourself with an idea without having to actually try to pass legislation. And of course they can go on the TV, especially on Sunday talk shows. What's a TV, who even watches TV? Now the idea of The Electoral Connection doesn't explain every action a member of Congress takes; sometimes they actually make laws to benefit the public good or maybe solve problems, huh, what an idea! But Mayhew's idea gives us a way of thinking about Congressional activity, an analytical lens that connects what Congressmen actually do with how most of us understand Congressmen, through elections. So the next time you see a Congressmen call for a hearing on a supposed horrible scandal or read about a Senator threatening to filibuster a policy that may have significant popular support, ask yourself, "Is this Representative claiming credit or taking a position, and how will this build their brand?" In other words: what's the electoral connection and how will whatever they're doing help them get elected? This might feel a little cynical, but the reality is Mayhew's thesis often seems to fit with today's politics. Thanks for watching, see you next week. Vote for me; I'm on the TV. I'm not -- I'm on the YouTube. Crash Course: Government and Politics is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Support for Crash Course US Government comes from Voqal. Voqal supports nonprofits that use technology and media to advance social equity. Learn more about their mission and initiatives at Voqal.org. Crash Course is made by all of these nice people. Thanks for watching. That guy isn't nice.

Contents

Overview

Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 2,684,592 60.28% 24 25 +1
Democratic 1,474,016 33.10% 12 11 -1
Libertarian 225,178 5.06% 0 0 -
Green 61,699 1.39% 0 0 -
Independent 8,014 0.18% 0 0 -
Totals 4,453,499 100.00% 36 36 0

District 1

The incumbent, Republican Louie Gohmert, represented the district since 2005. Democrat Shirley McKellar, who lost to Gohmert in 2012, ran for the district's seat again. Gohmert was re-elected with 77.5% of the vote.[1]

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 16,096 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley McKellar 7,240 100.0

General election

Texas's 1st congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 115,084 77.5
Democratic Shirley McKellar 33,476 22.5
Total votes 148,560 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The incumbent, Republican Ted Poe, represented the district since 2005. Democrat Niko Letsos and Libertarians Craig Cleveland and James Veasaw ran for the seat. Poe was re-elected with 67.95% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Poe (incumbent) 34,863 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Niko Letsos 5,906 100.0

General election

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Poe (Incumbent) 101,936 68.0
Democratic Niko Letsos 44,462 29.6
Libertarian James B Veasaw 2,316 1.5
Green Mark Roberts 1,312 0.9
Total votes 150,026 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent, Republican Sam Johnson, represented the district since 1991. Three Republicans, businesswoman Cami Dean; network engineer Josh Loveless; and pilot Harry Pierce, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012, ran against him in the Republican primary,[5] which Johnson won. Libertarian Cecil Ince and Green Paul Blair ran for the seat; no Democrat filed to run. Johnson was re-elected with 82.01% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 31,178 80.5
Republican Harry Pierce 3,004 7.8
Republican Cami Dean 2,435 6.3
Republican Josh Loveless 2,086 5.4
Total votes 38,703 100.0

General election

Texas's 3rd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 113,404 82.0
Green Paul Blair 24,876 18.0
Total votes 138,280 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent, Republican Ralph Hall, represented the district since 1981. He was challenged in the Republican primary by John Ratcliffe, Lou Gigliotti, John Stacy, Brent Lawson, and Tony Arterburn, which resulted in a runoff between Hall and Ratcliffe. Ratcliffe won the primary runoff with 52.82% of the vote. Ratcliffe won the election uncontested.

Republican primary

Candidates

At 91 years of age, Hall was the oldest member of the US House of Representatives. Fellow Republican John Ratcliffe, a former Mayor of Heath, and former United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas, challenged Hall in the primary election.[6] Also challenging Hall in the Republican primary were John Stacy, former city councillor of Fate City; auto racing part company owner and 2012 candidate Lou Gigliotti; United States Army veteran Tony Arterburn; and engineering manager Brent Lawson.[7]

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ralph Hall (incumbent) 29,848 45.4
Republican John Ratcliffe 18,917 28.8
Republican Lou Gigliotti 10,601 16.1
Republican John Stacy 2,812 4.3
Republican Brent Lawson 2,290 3.5
Republican Tony Arterburn 1,252 1.9
Total votes 65,720 100.0

Runoff

Polling
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ralph
Hall
John
Ratcliffe
Undecided
Gravis Marketing May 12, 2014 656 ± 4% 46% 38% 16%
Wenzel Strategies (R-Ratcliffe) March 12–13, 2014 436 ± ? 35.3% 47.2% 17.4%
Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe 22,271 52.8
Republican Ralph Hall (incumbent) 19,899 47.2
Total votes 42,170 100.0

Hall became the first incumbent Congressman of the 2014 cycle to be defeated in the primary, the oldest Congressman to lose a primary and the only sitting Republican U.S. Representative from Texas to unsuccessfully seek renomination to his or her seat out of 257 attempts since statehood.[9]

General election

Results

Texas's 4th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe 115,085 100.0
Total votes 115,085 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The incumbent, Republican Jeb Hensarling, represented the district since 2003. Libertarian Ken Ashby ran; no Democrat filed to run. Hensarling was re-elected with 85.36% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Hensarling (incumbent) 41,634 100.0

General election

Texas's 5th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Hensarling (incumbent) 88,998 85.4
Libertarian Ken Ashby 15,264 14.6
Total votes 104,262 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The incumbent, Republican Joe Barton, represented the district since 1985. Barton faced a primary election challenge from Frank Kuchar, with Barton winning 72.66% of the vote. Democrat David Edwin Cozad and Libertarian Hugh Chauvin also ran in the election. Barton was re-elected with 61.15% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 32,618 72.7
Republican Frank Kuchar 12,272 27.3
Total votes 44,890 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Edwin Cozad 11,727 100.0

General election

Texas's 6th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 92,334 61.2
Democratic David Cozad 55,027 36.4
Libertarian Hugh Chauvin 3,635 2.4
Total votes 150,996 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The incumbent, Republican John Culberson, represented the district since 2001. Energy attorney and nominee for the seat in 2012 James Cargas and activist Lissa Squires ran in the Democratic primary, which Cargas won with 62.19% of the vote. Libertarian Gerald Fowler ran in the election. Culberson was reelected with 63.26% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson (incumbent) 31,065 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Cargas 4,098 62.2
Democratic Lissa Squiers 2,491 37.8
Total votes 6,589 100.0

General election

Texas's 7th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson (incumbent) 90,606 63.3
Democratic James Cargas 49,478 34.5
Libertarian Grant Fowler 3,135 2.2
Total votes 143,219 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

The incumbent, Republican Kevin Brady, represented the district since 1997. Brady was challenged in the primary by Craig McMichael; Brady won with 68.27% of the vote. Libertarian Russ Jones and Ken Petty ran in a petition primary, which Ken Petty won; no Democrat filed to run. Brady was re-elected with 89.32% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 42,368 68.3
Republican Craig McMichael 19,687 31.7
Total votes 62,055 100.0

General election

Texas's 8th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 125,066 89.3
Libertarian Ken Petty 14,947 10.7
Total votes 140,013 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The incumbent, Democrat Al Green, represented the district since 2005. Green George Reiter and Libertarian Johnny Johnson ran in the election; no Republican filed to run. Green was re-elected with 90.82% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 13,442 100.0

General election

Texas's 9th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 78,109 90.8
Libertarian Johnny Johnson 7,894 9.2
Total votes 86,003 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

The incumbent, Republican Michael McCaul, represented the district since 2005. Democrat Tawana Walter-Cadien and Libertarian Bill Kelsey ran in the election. McCaul was reelected with 62.18% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 38,406 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 13,915 100.0

General election

Texas's 10th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 109,726 62.2
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 60,243 34.1
Libertarian Bill Kelsey 6,491 3.7
Total votes 176,460 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

The incumbent, Republican Mike Conaway, represented the district since 2005. Wade Brown ran against Conaway in the primary; Conaway won with 73.7% of the vote. Libertarian Ryan T. Lange ran in the election; no Democrat filed to run. Conaway won with 90.27% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway (incumbent) 53,272 73.7
Republican Wade Brown 19,010 26.3
Total votes 72,282 100.0

General election

Texas's 11th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway (incumbent) 107,939 90.3
Libertarian Ryan T. Lange 11,635 9.7
Total votes 119,574 100.0
Republican hold

District 12

The incumbent, Republican Kay Granger, represented the district since 1997. Democrat Mark Greene[10] and Libertarian Ed Colliver ran in the election. Granger was reelected with 71.31% of the vote.[11]

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (incumbent) 39,907 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Greene 9,700 100.0

General election

Texas's 12th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (Incumbent) 113,186 71.3
Democratic Mark Greene 41,757 26.3
Libertarian Ed Colliver 3,787 2.4
Total votes 158,730 100.0
Republican hold

District 13

The incumbent, Republican Mac Thornberry, represented the district since 1995. He was challenged for the Republican nomination by Elaine Hays, a businesswoman from Amarilla; and Pam Barlow, a veterinarian from Bowie, Texas.[12] Thornberry won the primary with 68.2% of the vote. Democrat Mike Minter, Green Don Cook and Libertarian Emily Pivoda ran in the election.[11] Thornberry was reelected with 84.32% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry (incumbent) 45,168 68.2
Republican Elaine Hays 12,330 18.6
Republican Pam Barlow 8,723 13.2
Total votes 66,221 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Minter 4,842 100.0

General election

Texas's 13th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry (incumbent) 110,842 84.3
Democratic Mike Minter 16,822 12.8
Libertarian Emily Pivoda 2,863 2.2
Green Don Cook 924 0.7
Total votes 131,451 100.0
Republican hold

District 14

The incumbent, Republican Randy Weber, represented the district since 2013. Don Brown, Gagan Panjhazari and Buck Willis ran in the Democratic primary; Brown won with 68.23% of the vote. Libertarian John Wieder ran in the election. Weber was reelected with 61.85% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 34,131 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Don Brown 9,780 68.2
Democratic Buck Willis 3,699 25.8
Democratic Gagan Panjhazari 853 6.0
Total votes 14,332 100.0

General election

Texas's 14th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 90,116 61.8
Democratic Donald Brown 52,545 36.1
Libertarian John Wieder 3,037 2.1
Total votes 145,698 100.0
Republican hold

District 15

The incumbent, Democrat Rubén Hinojosa, represented the district since 1997. Doug Carlile and Eddie Zamora ran in the Republican primary; Zamora won with 54.93% of the vote.[13] Libertarian Johnny Partain ran in the election. Hinojosa was reelected with 54.01% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Eddie Zamora 7,810 54.9
Republican Doug Carlile 6,407 45.1
Total votes 14,217 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rubén Hinojosa (incumbent) 29,916 100

General election

Texas's 15th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Hinojosa (incumbent) 48,708 54.0
Republican Eddie Zamora 39,016 43.3
Libertarian Johnny Partain 2,460 2.7
Total votes 90,184 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16

The incumbent, Democrat Beto O'Rourke, represented the district since 2013. Republican Corey Roen and Libertarian Jaime Perez ran in the election. O'Rourke was reelected with 67.49% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Corey Roen 6,239 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke (incumbent) 24,728 100.0

General election

Texas's 16th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke (incumbent) 49,338 67.5
Republican Corey Roen 21,324 29.2
Libertarian Jamie O. Perez 2,443 3.3
Total votes 73,105 100.0
Democratic hold

District 17

The incumbent, Republican Bill Flores, represented the district since 2011. Democrat Nick Haynes and Libertarians Shawn Hamilton and Bill Oliver ran in the election.[11] Flores was reelected with 64.58% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores (incumbent) 32,770 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nick Haynes 10,141 100.0

General election

Texas's 17th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores (incumbent) 85,807 64.6
Democratic Nick Haynes 43,049 32.4
Libertarian Shawn Michael Hamilton 4,009 3.0
Total votes 132,865 100.0
Republican hold

District 18

The incumbent, Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, represented the district since 1995. Republican Sean Seibert, Green Remington Alessi and Libertarian Jennifer Whelan ran in the election.[11] Lee was reelected with 71.78% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sean Seibert 6,527 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 14,373 100.0

General election

Texas's 18th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 76,097 71.8
Republican Sean Seibert 26,249 24.8
Independent Vince Duncan 2,362 2.2
Green Remington Alessi 1,302 1.2
Total votes 106,010 100.0
Democratic hold

District 19

The incumbent, Republican Randy Neugebauer, represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican Party primary by physician Donald May and Chris Winn, a former Chairman of the Lubbock County Republican Party and candidate for the seat in 2012; Neugebauer won with 64.36% of the vote. Democrat Neal Marchbanks of Lubbock,[12] Green Mark Lawson and Libertarian Richard Peterson ran in the election.[11] Neugebauer was reelected with 77.18% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Neugebauer (incumbent) 39,611 64.4
Republican Donald May 14,498 23.5
Republican Chris Winn 7,429 12.1
Total votes 61,538 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Neal Marchbanks 6,476 100.0

General election

Texas's 19th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Neugebauer (incumbent) 90,160 77.2
Democratic Neal Marchbanks 21,458 18.4
Libertarian Richard (Chip) Peterson 5,146 4.4
Independent Donald Vance (write-in) 54 0.0
Total votes 116,818 100.0
Republican hold

District 20

The incumbent, Democrat Joaquín Castro, represented the district since 2013. Libertarian Jeffrey Blunt ran in the election; no Republican filed to run.[11][13] Castro was reelected with 75.66% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquín Castro (incumbent) 16,275 100.0

General election

Texas's 20th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquin Castro (incumbent) 66,554 75.7
Libertarian Jeffrey C. Blunt 21,410 24.3
Total votes 87,964 100.0
Democratic hold

District 21

The incumbent, Republican Lamar S. Smith, represented the district since 1987. He faced businessman Matt McCall and Michael J. Smith in the Republican primary; Smith won with 60.43% of the vote. Green Antonio Diaz and Libertarian Ryan Shields ran in the election.[11] Smith was reelected with 71.78% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar S. Smith (incumbent) 40,441 60.4
Republican Matt McCall 22,681 33.9
Republican Michael J. Smith 3,796 5.7
Total votes 66,918 100.0

General election

Texas's 21st congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 135,660 71.8
Green Antonio Diaz 27,831 14.7
Libertarian Ryan Shields 25,505 13.5
Total votes 188,996 100.0
Republican hold

District 22

The incumbent, Republican Pete Olson, represented the district since 2009. Democrats Frank Briscoe and Mark Gibson ran for their party's nomination; Briscoe won with 53.18% of the vote. Libertarian Rob Lapham ran in the election. Olson was reelected with 66.55% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson (incumbent) 33,167 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Briscoe 3,378 53.2
Democratic Mark Gibson 2,973 46.8
Total votes 6,351 100.0

General election

Texas's 22nd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson (incumbent) 100,861 66.5
Democratic Frank Briscoe 47,844 31.6
Libertarian Rob Lapham 2,861 1.9
Total votes 151,566 100.0
Republican hold

District 23

The incumbent, Democrat Pete Gallego, represented the district since 2013. Will Hurd, Robert Lowry, and Quico Canseco ran in the Republican primary; Hurd and Canseco had a runoff which Hurd won with 59.46% of the vote. Libertarian Ruben Corvalan ran in the election. Hurd was elected with 49.78% of the vote, making this the only U.S. House seat in Texas to flip in 2014.

Republican primary

Soon after the 2012 election, Republicans began recruiting new candidates to challenge Gallego in 2014, including Rolando Pablos, a public utility commissioner and former Chairman of the board for the Museo Alameda.[14] Pablos declined to run but Canseco filed to run again.[15] Two other Republicans, Dr. Robert Lowry and former CIA officer Will Hurd, who was a candidate for the seat in 2010 also ran.[13]

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 10,496 41.0
Republican Quico Canseco 10,332 40.3
Republican Robert Lowry 4,796 18.7
Total votes 25,624 100.0

Runoff

Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 8,699 59.5
Republican Quico Canseco 5,930 40.5
Total votes 14,629 100.0

Democratic primary

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete P. Gallego (incumbent) 26,484 100.0

General election

Texas's 23rd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd 57,459 49.8
Democratic Pete Gallego (incumbent) 55,037 47.7
Libertarian Ruben Corvalan 2,933 2.5
Total votes 115,429 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

District 24

The incumbent, Republican Kenny Marchant, represented the district since 2005. Democrat Patrick McGehearty and Libertarian Mike Kolls ran in the election. Marchant was reelected with 65.04% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant (incumbent) 34,265 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick McGehearty 8,247 100.0

General election

Texas's 24th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant (incumbent) 93,712 65.0
Democratic Patrick McGehearty 46,548 32.3
Libertarian Mike Kolls 3,813 2.7
Total votes 144,073 100.0
Republican hold

District 25

The incumbent, Republican Roger Williams, who has represented the district since 2013. Stuart Gourd and Marco Montoya ran in the Democratic primary; Montoya won with 75.16% of the vote. Libertarian John Betz ran in the election. Williams was reelected with 60.22% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 43,030 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marco Montoya 11,691 75.2
Democratic Stuart Gourd 3,863 24.8
Total votes 15,554 100.0

General election

Texas's 25th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 107,120 60.2
Democratic Marco Montoya 64,463 36.3
Libertarian John Betz 6,300 3.5
Total votes 177,883 100.0
Republican hold

District 26

The incumbent, Republican Michael C. Burgess, represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Joel A. Krause and Divenchy Watrous;[10] Burgess won with 82.62% of the vote. Libertarian Mark Boler ran in the election; no Democrat filed to run. Burgess was reelected with 82.66% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 33,909 82.6
Republican Joel A. Krause 6,433 15.7
Republican Divenchy Watrous 698 1.7
Total votes 41,040 100.0

General election

Texas's 26th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 116,944 82.7
Libertarian Mark Boler 24,526 17.3
Total votes 141,470 100.0
Republican hold

District 27

The incumbent, Republican Blake Farenthold, represented the district since 2011. Democrat Wesley Reed and Libertarian Roxanne Simonson ran in the election.[11] Farenthold was reelected with 63.60% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold (incumbent) 32,727 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Wesley Reed 11,585 100.0

General election

Texas's 27th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold (incumbent) 83,342 63.6
Democratic Wesley Reed 44,152 33.7
Libertarian Roxanne Simonson 3,553 2.7
Total votes 131,047 100.0
Republican hold

District 28

The incumbent, Democrat Henry Cuellar, represented the district since 2005. Green Michael Cary and Libertarian Jaime Perez ran in the election; no Republican filed to run. Cuellar was reelected with 82.1% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 36,821 100.0

General election

Texas's 28th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 62,508 82.1
Libertarian William Aikens 10,153 13.3
Green Michael Cary 3,475 4.6
Total votes 76,136 100.0
Democratic hold

District 29

The 21 year establishment incumbent, Democrat Gene Green, has won the district since 1993. Libertarian Constitutionalist James Stanczak ran in the election in 2012 and 2014, and placed second both times. Despite Stanczak having the largest ever turnout by conservatives and liberals for a third party, Green was reelected with 89.55% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green (incumbent) 6,244 100.0

General election

Texas's 29th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green (incumbent) 41,321 79.6
Libertarian James Stanczak 4,822 10.4
Total votes 46,143 100.0
Democratic hold

District 30

The incumbent, Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, represented the district since 1993. State Representative Barbara Mallory Caraway, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012, challenged Johnson in the Democratic primary for a second time; Johnson won with 69.92% of the vote. Libertarian Max Koch III and independent Eric LeMonte Williams ran in the election; no Republican filed to run. Johnson was reelected with 87.95% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 23,756 69.9
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 10,216 30.1
Total votes 33,972 100.0

General election

Texas's 30th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 93,041 87.9
Libertarian Max W. Koch III 7,154 6.8
Independent Eric LeMonte Williams 5,598 5.3
Total votes 105,793.0 100
Democratic hold

District 31

The incumbent, Republican John Carter, who has represented the district since 2003. Democrat Louie Minor and Libertarian Scott Ballard ran in the election. Carter was reelected with 64.05% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 30,011 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Louie Minor 8,036 100.0

General election

Texas's 31st congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 91,607 64.0
Democratic Louie Minor 45,715 32.0
Libertarian Scott J. Ballard 5,706 4.0
Total votes 143,028 100.0
Republican hold

District 32

The incumbent, Republican Pete Sessions, represented the district since 2003, and previously represented the 5th district from 1997 to 2003. Katrina Pierson, a Tea Party activist, challenged Sessions for the Republican nomination;[16] Sessions won with 63.61% of the vote. Democratic attorney Frank Perez and Libertarian Edward Rankin ran in the election.[11] Sessions was reelected with 61.82% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions (incumbent) 28,981 63.6
Republican Katrina Pierson 16,574 36.4
Total votes 45,555 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Perez 10,681 100.0

General election

Texas's 32nd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions (incumbent) 96,495 61.8
Democratic Frank Perez 55,325 35.4
Libertarian Ed Rankin 4,276 2.8
Total votes 156,096 100.0
Republican hold

District 33

The incumbent, Democrat Marc Veasey, represented the district since 2013. Libertarian Jason Reeves ran in the election.[17] No Republican filed to run.[11] Veasey was reelected with 86.51% of the vote.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 13,292 73.5
Democratic Tom Sanchez 4,798 26.5
Total votes 18,090 100.0

General election

Texas's 33rd congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 43,769 86.5
Libertarian Jason Reeves 6,823 13.5
Total votes 50,592 100.0
Democratic hold

District 34

The incumbent, Democrat Filemon Vela, Jr., represented the district since 2013. Republican Larry Smith and Libertarian Ryan Rowley ran in the election.[13] Vela was reelected with 59.47% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Smith 7,427 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon B Vela (incumbent) 26,237 100.0

General election

Texas's 34th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon Vela (incumbent) 47,503 59.5
Republican Larry Smith 30,811 38.5
Libertarian Ryan Rowley 1,563 2.0
Total votes 79,877 100.0
Democratic hold

District 35

The incumbent, Democrat Lloyd Doggett, represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 25th district from 2005 to 2013 and the 10th district from 1995 to 2005. Republican Susan Narvaiz, Green Kat Swift and Libertarian Cory Bruner ran in the election.[13] Doggett was reelected with 62.48% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Narvaiz 9,717 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 15,399 100.0

General election

Texas's 35th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 60,124 62.5
Republican Susan Narvaiz 32,040 33.3
Libertarian Cory Bruner 2,767 2.9
Green Kat Swift 1,294 1.3
Total votes 96,225 100.0
Democratic hold

District 36

The incumbent, Republican Steve Stockman, represented the district since 2013 and previously represented the 9th district from 1995 to 1997. Stockman did not run for reelection. John Amdur, Brian Babin, Doug Centilli, Jim Engstrand, Phil Fitzgerald, Pat Kasprzak, John Manlove, Chuck MeyerKim Morrell, Dave Norman, Robin Riley, and Ben Streusand ran in the Republican primary; a runoff between Ben Streusand and Brian Babin was held which Babin won with 57.84% of the vote. Democrat Michael K. Cole, who ran as a Libertarian in 2012, Libertarian Rodney Veach, and Green Hal J. Ridley, Jr. ran in the election. Babin won the election with 75.96% of the vote.

Republican primary

At the deadline to file for the 2014 elections, Stockman chose to challenge John Cornyn for the United States Senate, rather than run for re-election.[18]

Candidates

Results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin 17,194 33.4
Republican Ben Streusand 12,024 23.3
Republican John Manlove 3,556 6.9
Republican Doug Centilli 3,506 6.8
Republican Phil Fitzgerald 3,388 6.6
Republican Robin Riley 2,648 5.1
Republican Dave Norman 2,325 4.5
Republican Chuck Meyer 1,574 3.0
Republican John Amdur 1,470 2.9
Republican Kim Morrell 1,444 2.8
Republican Jim Engstrand 1,288 2.5
Republican Pat Kasprzak 1,116 2.2
Total votes 51,533 100.0

Runoff

Results
Republican primary runoff results[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin 19,301 57.8
Republican Ben Streusand 14,069 42.2
Total votes 33,370 100.0

Democratic primary

Results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael K. Cole 6,507 100.0

General election

Texas's 36th congressional district, 2014[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin 101,663 75.9
Democratic Michael Cole 29,543 22.1
Libertarian Rodney Veach 1,951 1.5
Green Hal J. Ridley, Jr. 685 0.5
Total votes 133,842 100.0
Republican hold

See also

References

  1. ^ ballotpedia.org - Texas's 1st Congressional District 2014
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe Archived November 8, 2006, at the Wayback Machine 2014 Republican Party Primary Election
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac http://elections.sos.state.tx.us/elchist.exe Archived November 8, 2006, at the Wayback Machine 2014 Democratic Party Primary Election
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "Texas Statewide Results General Election - November 4, 2014 Official Results". Texas Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2015.
  5. ^ "Two GOP challengers for Rep. Sam Johnson | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  6. ^ "Ex-US Attorney John Ratcliffe files against Ralph Hall | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. April 16, 2008. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  7. ^ "Rep. Ralph Hall draws five primary challengers | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c "Texas - Summary Vote Results". Associated Press. May 28, 2014. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  9. ^ Ostermeier, Eric (May 28, 2014). "Hall Makes History: 1st Texas GOP US Rep to Lose Renomination Bid". Smart Politics.
  10. ^ a b Tinsley, Anna M. (August 28, 2010). "Filing ends, ballot set for 2014 election | Elections & Politics | News from Fort Worth". Star-telegram.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Texas Congressional Candidates". Burnt Orange Report. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  12. ^ a b Rangel, Enrique. "Thornberry gets challengers in race for Panhandle, West Texas Congressional seat | Lubbock Online | Lubbock Avalanche-Journal". Lubbock Online. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c d e "Stockman to challenge Cornyn; Canseco, 2 others file for District 23 - San Antonio Express-News". Mysanantonio.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  14. ^ "Local politicians in permanent campaign - San Antonio Express-News". Mysanantonio.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  15. ^ "Quico Canseco will try to reclaim seat from Rep. Pete Gallego | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. September 25, 2012. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  16. ^ "Democrat files to challenge Rep. Pete Sessions | Dallas Morning News". Trailblazersblog.dallasnews.com. October 15, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  17. ^ Young, Stephen (July 10, 2014). "Meet Jason Reeves, the Guy Guaranteed to Finish at Least Second to Marc Veasey". Unfair Park. Dallas Observer. Retrieved July 14, 2014.
  18. ^ "Stockman challenges Cornyn in Texas US Senate race". Northjersey.com. Retrieved December 10, 2013.
  19. ^ "2014 Primary: John Amdur, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 19, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g "The Most Important Race for NASA & Houston's Economy". The Houston Chronicle. February 14, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  21. ^ "2014 Primary: Colonel Jim Engstrand, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 1, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  22. ^ "Crosby's Kasprzak running for Congress". The Lake Houston Observer. December 31, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  23. ^ "Manlove for the 36th Congressional District". The Houston Chronicle. January 28, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  24. ^ "2014 Primary: Robin Riley, CD-36". The Houston Chronicle. February 4, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.

External links

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