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Texas's 26th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Texas's 26th congressional district
Texas US Congressional District 26 (since 2013).tif
Texas's 26th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Michael C. Burgess
RPilot Point
Distribution
  • 93.4% urban[1]
  • 6.6% rural
Population (2019)920,865[2]
Median household
income
$96,307[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+18[4]

Texas's 26th congressional district of the United States House of Representatives includes the area in the northern portion of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex centering on Denton County, and includes two public universities, the University of North Texas and Texas Women's University. The current Representative is Michael C. Burgess. The district is best known as the seat of former House Majority Leader Dick Armey.

History

The district was created after the 1980 census due to population growth in Texas and Denton County, specifically in its southern sector. Since its creation, the district has been based in Denton County, one of Texas's fastest-growing counties.

Democrat Tom Vandergriff was the first person to represent the district, winning in 1982. Vandergriff narrowly lost to Republican Dick Armey in 1984, and the seat has continuously been held by Republicans ever since. Indeed, since Vandergriff's defeat in 1984, no Democrat has crossed the 40 percent mark. As Denton County has become overwhelmingly Republican in recent years (all but one county officeholder is Republican, as is all but one member of the Texas Legislature representing the county), the 26th district is considered a "safe seat" for the GOP.

Since the 2010 redistricting, the 26th district has included most of Denton County (except the southeast portion) and a portion of north central Tarrant County.

However, the district has been trending Democratic in recent years. Donald Trump carried it by 14 points in 2020, while Mitt Romney had carried it by 37 in 2012.

After the 2020 Census, rapid growth resulted in significant changes in the composition of the district. For the first time since the district's creation, the City of Denton, the county seat of Denton County, will not be a part of the district, instead part of Texas's 13th Congressional District. Lewisville became the largest city in the district, and portions of Wise County and all of Cooke County will become part of the district. The district also lost the sliver of Frisco that had previously been in the district.

Election results from presidential races

Year Office Result
2000 President Bush 71 – 27%
2004 President Bush 65 – 35%
2008 President McCain 58 – 41%
2012 President Romney 68 – 31%
2016 President Trump 60 – 34%
2020 President Trump 56 – 42%

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Years Congress Electoral history
District created January 3, 1983
Tom Vandergriff Feb. 1983 Ninety-Eighth Congress Pictorial Directory.gif
Tom Vandergriff
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1985
98th Elected in 1982.
Lost re-election.
Dick Armey, official 105th Congress photo.jpg
Dick Armey
Republican January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 2003
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
First elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Retired.
Michael Burgess, Official Portrait, c112th Congress.jpg
Michael Burgess
Republican January 3, 2003 –
present
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
116th
First elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election results

2004 election

US House election, 2004: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 180,519 65.75 -9.1
Democratic Lico Reyes 89,809 32.71 +9.9
Libertarian James Gholston 4,211 1.53 +0.1
Majority 90,710 33.0
Turnout 274,539
Republican hold Swing -9.5

2006 election

US House election, 2006: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 94,219 60.21 -5.54
Democratic Tim Barnwell 58,271 37.23 +4.52
Libertarian Rich Haas 3,993 2.55 +1.02
Majority 35,948 22.97
Turnout 156,483
Republican hold Swing -5.03

2008 election

US House election, 2008: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 194,849 60.19 -0.02
Democratic Ken Leach 117,895 36.42 -0.82
Libertarian Stephanie Weiss 11,002 3.40 0.85
Majority 76,954 23.77 +0.8
Turnout 323,746
Republican hold Swing -0.02

2010 election

US House election, 2010: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 120,683 67.08 +6.89
Democratic Neil Durrance 55,182 30.67 -5.75
Libertarian Mark Boler 4,049 2.25 -1.15
Majority 65,501 36.41 +12.64
Turnout 179,914
Republican hold Swing +6.89

2016 election

US House election, 2016: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 211,730 66.4 -0.68
Democratic Eric Mauck 94,507 29.6 -1.07
Libertarian Mark Boler 12,843 4.0 +1.75
Majority 117,223 36.8 +0.39
Turnout 319,080
Republican hold Swing -0.68

2018 election

US House election, 2018: Texas District 26
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Michael Burgess (incumbent) 185,551 59.4 -7.0
Democratic Linsey Fagan 121,938 39.0 +9.4
Libertarian Mark Boler 5,016 1.6 -2.4
Majority 59,613 20.4 -16.4
Turnout 312,505
Republican hold Swing -7.0

2020 election

US House election, 2020: Texas District 26[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 261,963 60.6
Democratic Carol Iannuzzi 161,009 37.3
Libertarian Mark Boler 9,243 2.1
Total votes 432,215 100.0
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

2007 - 2013
2007 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/cd_state.html
  2. ^ "My Congressional District".
  3. ^ "My Congressional District".
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ "Texas Election Results - Official Results". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved November 26, 2020.

This page was last edited on 25 November 2021, at 01:45
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