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1994 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1994 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

← 1992 November 8, 1994 1996 →

All 30 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 21 9
Seats won 19 11
Seat change Decrease2 Increase2
Popular vote 1,734,163 2,294,222
Percentage 42.1% 55.7%
Swing Decrease7.8% Increase7.9%

1994 Texas US House.svg

The 1994 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas occurred on November 8, 1994, to elect the members of the state of Texas's delegation to the United States House of Representatives. Texas had thirty seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1990 United States Census.

These elections occurred simultaneously with the United States Senate elections of 1994, the United States House elections in other states, and various state and local elections.

Amidst the Republican Revolution, in which the Republican Party took control of the U.S. House for the first time since 1952, Republicans gained two seats in the U.S. House of Representatives from Texas and won the statewide popular vote, but Democrats maintained their majority of Texas seats due to redistricting.[1]

Overview

1994 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats before Seats after +/–
Republican 2,294,222 55.68% 9 11 +2
Democratic 1,734,163 42.09% 21 19 -2
Libertarian 35,889 0.87% 0 0 -
Independent 55,786 1.35% 0 0 -
Totals 4,120,060 100.00% 30 30

Congressional Districts

District 1

Incumbent Democrat Jim Chapman ran for re-election.

Texas's 1st congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Chapman (incumbent) 86,480 55.30
Republican Mike Blankenship 63,911 40.87
Independent Jefferson Mosser 6,001 3.84
Total votes 156,392 100
Democratic hold

District 2

Incumbent Democrat Charlie Wilson ran for re-election.

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charlie Wilson (incumbent) 87,709 57.04
Republican Donna Peterson 66,071 42.96
Total votes 153,780 100
Democratic hold

District 3

Incumbent Republican Sam Johnson ran for re-election.

Texas's 3rd congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 157,011 90.96
Libertarian Tom Donahue 15,611 9.04
Total votes 172,622 100
Republican hold

District 4

Incumbent Democrat Ralph Hall ran for re-election.

Texas's 4th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ralph M. Hall (incumbent) 99,303 58.78
Republican David Bridges 67,267 39.82
Libertarian Jefferson Mosser 2,377 1.41
Total votes 168,947 100
Democratic hold

District 5

Incumbent Democrat John Wiley Bryant ran for re-election.

Texas's 5th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Wiley Bryant (incumbent) 61,877 50.06
Republican Pete Sessions 58,521 47.34
Independent Barbara Morgan 1,715 1.39
Libertarian Noel Kopala 876 0.71
Independent Regina Arashvand 627 0.51
Total votes 123,616 100
Democratic hold

District 6

Incumbent Republican Joe Barton ran for re-election.

Texas's 6th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 152,038 75.64
Democratic Terry Jesmore 44,286 22.03
Libertarian Bill Baird 4,688 2.33
Total votes 201,012 100
Republican hold

District 7

Incumbent Republican Bill Archer ran for re-election unopposed.

Texas's 7th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Archer (incumbent) 116,873 100.00
Total votes 116,873 100
Republican hold

District 8

Incumbent Republican Jack Fields ran for re-election.

Texas's 8th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jack Fields (incumbent) 148,473 92.05
Independent Russ Klecka 12,831 7.95
Total votes 161,304 100
Republican hold

District 9

Incumbent Democrat Jack Brooks ran for re-election.

Texas's 9th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Stockman 81,353 51.88
Democratic Jack Brooks (incumbent) 71,643 45.69
Independent Bill Felton 2,145 1.37
Libertarian Darla Beenau 1,656 1.06
Total votes 156,797 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

District 10

Incumbent Democrat J. J. Pickle opted to retire rather than run for re-election.[3]

Texas's 10th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett 113,738 56.31
Republican Jo Baylor 80,382 39.80
Libertarian Jeff Hill 2,953 1.46
Independent Michael Brandes 2,579 1.28
Independent Jeff Davis 2,334 1.16
Total votes 201,986 100
Democratic hold

District 11

Incumbent Democrat Chet Edwards ran for re-election.

Texas's 11th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Chet Edwards (incumbent) 76,667 59.18
Republican Jim Broyles 52,876 40.82
Total votes 129,543 100
Democratic hold

District 12

Incumbent Democrat Pete Geren ran for re-election.

Texas's 12th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Geren (incumbent) 96,372 68.67
Republican Ernest Anderson 43,959 31.33
Total votes 140,331 100
Democratic hold

District 13

Incumbent Democrat Bill Sarpalius ran for re-election.

Texas's 13th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry 79,466 55.42
Democratic Bill Sarpalius (incumbent) 63,923 44.58
Total votes 143,389 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

District 14

Incumbent Democrat Greg Laughlin ran for re-election.

Texas's 14th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Laughlin (incumbent) 86,175 55.61
Republican Jim Deats 68,793 44.39
Total votes 154,968 100
Democratic hold

District 15

Incumbent Democrat Kika de la Garza ran for re-election.

Texas's 15th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kika de la Garza (incumbent) 61,527 58.95
Republican Tom Haughey 41,119 39.40
Libertarian John Hamilton 1,720 1.65
Total votes 104,366 100
Democratic hold

District 16

Incumbent Democrat Ronald D. Coleman ran for re-election.

Texas's 16th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ronald D. Coleman (incumbent) 49,815 57.11
Republican Bobby Ortiz 37,409 42.89
Total votes 87,224 100
Democratic hold

District 17

Incumbent Democrat Charles Stenholm ran for re-election.

Texas's 17th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charles Stenholm (incumbent) 83,497 53.66
Republican Phil Boone 72,108 46.34
Total votes 155,605 100
Democratic hold

District 18

Incumbent Democrat Craig Washington ran for re-election. He was defeated in the Democratic Primary by Houston City Councilor Sheila Jackson Lee.[4][5]

Texas's 18th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee 84,790 73.48
Republican Jerry Burley 28,153 24.40
Independent J. Larry Snellings 1,278 1.11
Libertarian George Hollenbeck 1,169 1.01
Total votes 115,390 100
Democratic hold

District 19

Incumbent Republican Larry Combest ran for re-election unopposed.

Texas's 19th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Larry Combest (incumbent) 120,641 100.00
Total votes 120,641 100
Republican hold

District 20

Incumbent Democrat Henry B. González ran for re-election.

Texas's 20th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry B. Gonzalez (incumbent) 60,114 62.52
Republican Carl Bill Colyer 36,035 37.48
Total votes 96,149 100
Democratic hold

District 21

Incumbent Republican Lamar Smith ran for re-election.

Texas's 21st congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar Smith (incumbent) 165,595 89.96
Independent Kerry Lowry 18,480 10.04
Total votes 184,075 100
Republican hold

District 22

Incumbent Republican Tom DeLay ran for re-election.

Texas's 22nd congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom DeLay (incumbent) 120,302 73.74
Democratic Scott Douglas Cunningham 38,826 23.80
Independent Gregory Pepper 4,016 2.46
Total votes 163,144 100
Republican hold

District 23

Incumbent Republican Henry Bonilla ran for re-election.

Texas's 23rd congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Henry Bonilla (incumbent) 73,815 62.60
Democratic Rolando Rios 44,101 37.40
Total votes 117,916 100
Republican hold

District 24

Incumbent Democrat Martin Frost ran for re-election.

Texas's 24th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Martin Frost (incumbent) 65,019 52.83
Republican Ed Harrison 58,062 47.17
Total votes 123,081 100
Democratic hold

District 25

Incumbent Democrat Michael A. Andrews retired to run for U.S. Senator.[6]

Texas's 25th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ken Bentsen 61,959 52.27
Republican Gene Fontenot 53,321 44.99
Independent Sarah Klein-Tower 2,060 1.74
Libertarian Robert Lockhart 1,189 1.00
Total votes 118,529 100
Democratic hold

District 26

Incumbent Republican Dick Armey ran for re-election. He became the first Texas Republican to be elected majority leader of the U.S. House of Representatives.[1]

Texas's 26th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dick Armey (incumbent) 135,398 76.41
Democratic LeEarl Ann Bryant 39,763 22.44
Libertarian Alfred Adask 2,030 1.15
Total votes 177,191 100
Republican hold

District 27

Incumbent Democrat Solomon Ortiz ran for re-election.

Texas's 27th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Solomon Ortiz (incumbent) 65,325 59.38
Republican Erol Stone 44,693 40.62
Total votes 110,018 100
Democratic hold

District 28

Incumbent Democrat Frank Tejeda ran for re-election.

Texas's 28th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Frank Tejeda (incumbent) 73,986 70.88
Republican David Slatter 28,777 27.57
Libertarian Steve Rothstein 1,612 1.54
Total votes 104,375 100
Democratic hold

District 29

Incumbent Democrat Gene Green ran for re-election.

Texas's 29th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green (incumbent) 44,102 73.44
Republican Oilman Eide 15,952 26.56
Total votes 60,054 100
Democratic hold

District 30

Incumbent Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson ran for re-election.

Texas's 30th congressional district, 1994[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 73,166 72.63
Republican Lucy Cain 25,848 25.66
Libertarian Ken Ashby 1,728 1.72
Total votes 100,742 100
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ a b Ramos, Mary G. (1995). "Texas Almanac, 1996-1997". The Portal to Texas History. pp. 448–449. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "1994 General Election". elections.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved 2022-06-15.
  3. ^ "Rep. Pickle, 80, of Texas Will Retire Next Year". Los Angeles Times. 1993-12-04. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  4. ^ "1994 Democratic Primary Election". elections.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved 2022-06-15.
  5. ^ "Washington says he will not seek public office again". UPI. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  6. ^ "Texas congressman enters Senate race". UPI. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
This page was last edited on 28 June 2022, at 04:07
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