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2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas

← 2014 November 8, 2016 2018 →

All 36 Texas seats to the United States House of Representatives
Turnout57%
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Seats before 25 11
Seats won 25 11
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 4,877,605 3,160,535
Percentage 57.19% 37.06%
Swing Decrease3.09% Increase3.96%

United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2016 results by district.svg
Popular vote by congressional district. As this is a first-past-the-post election, seat totals are not determined by total popular vote in the state, but instead by results in each congressional district.

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Texas were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the 36 U.S. Representatives from the State of Texas, one from each of the state's 36 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 1.

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Transcription

Hi, I'm Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we're going to talk about what is, if you ask the general public, the most important part of politics: elections. If you ask me, it's hair styles. Look at Martin Van Buren's sideburns, how could he not be elected? Americans are kind of obsessed with elections, I mean when this was being recorded in early 2015, television, news and the internet were already talking about who would be Democrat and Republican candidates for president in 2016. And many of the candidates have unofficially been campaigning for years. I've been campaigning; your grandma's been campaigning. Presidential elections are exciting and you can gamble on them. Is that legal, can you gamble on them, Stan? Anyway, why we're so obsessed with them is a topic for another day. Right now I'm gonna tell you that the fixation on the presidential elections is wrong, but not because the president doesn't matter. No, today we're gonna look at the elections of the people that are supposed to matter the most, Congress. Constitutionally at least, Congress is the most important branch of government because it is the one that is supposed to be the most responsive to the people. One of the main reasons it's so responsive, at least in theory, is the frequency of elections. If a politician has to run for office often, he or she, because unlike the president we have women serving in Congress, kind of has to pay attention to what the constituents want, a little bit, maybe. By now, I'm sure that most of you have memorized the Constitution, so you recognize that despite their importance in the way we discuss politics, elections aren't really a big feature of the Constitution. Except of course for the ridiculously complex electoral college system for choosing the president, which we don't even want to think about for a few episodes. In fact, here's what the Constitution says about Congressional Elections in Article 1 Section 2: "The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature." So the Constitution does establish that the whole of the house is up for election every 2 years, and 1/3 of the senate is too, but mainly it leaves the scheduling and rules of elections up to the states. The actual rules of elections, like when the polls are open and where they actually are, as well as the registration requirements, are pretty much up to the states, subject to some federal election law. If you really want to know the rules in your state, I'm sure that someone at the Board of Elections, will be happy to explain them to you. Really, you should give them a call; they're very, very lonely. In general though, here's what we can say about American elections. First stating the super obvious, in order to serve in congress, you need to win an election. In the House of Representatives, each election district chooses a single representative, which is why we call them single-member districts. The number of districts is determined by the Census, which happens every 10 years, and which means that elections ending in zeros are super important, for reasons that I'll explain in greater detail in a future episode. It's because of gerrymandering. The Senate is much easier to figure out because both of the state Senators are elected by the entire state. It's as if the state itself were a single district, which is true for states like Wyoming, which are so unpopulated as to have only 1 representative. Sometimes these elections are called at large elections. Before the election ever happens, you need candidates. How candidates are chosen differs from state to state, but usually it has something to do with political parties, although it doesn't have to. Why are things so complicated?! What we can say is that candidates, or at least good candidates, usually have certain characteristics. Sorry America. First off, if you are gonna run for office, you should have an unblemished record, free of, oh I don't know, felony convictions or sex scandals, except maybe in Louisiana or New York. This might lead to some pretty bland candidates or people who are so calculating that they have no skeletons in their closet, but we Americans are a moral people and like our candidates to reflect our ideals rather than our reality. The second characteristic that a candidate must possess is the ability to raise money. Now some candidates are billionaires and can finance their own campaigns. But most billionaires have better things to do: buying yachts, making even more money, building money forts, buying more yachts, so they don't have time to run for office. But most candidates get their money for their campaigns by asking for it. The ability to raise money is key, especially now, because running for office is expensive. Can I get a how expensive is it? "How expensive is it?!" Well, so expensive that the prices of elections continually rises and in 2012 winners of House races spent nearly 2 million each. Senate winners spent more than 10 million. By the time this episode airs, I'm sure the numbers will be much higher like a gajillion billion million. Money is important in winning an election, but even more important, statistically, is already being in Congress. Let's go to the Thought Bubble. The person holding an office who runs for that office again is called the incumbent and has a big advantage over any challenger. This is according to political scientists who, being almost as bad at naming things as historians, refer to this as incumbency advantage. There are a number of reasons why incumbents tend to hold onto their seats in congress, if they want to. The first is that a sitting congressman has a record to run on, which we hope includes some legislative accomplishments, although for the past few Congresses, these don't seem to matter. The record might include case work, which is providing direct services to constituents. This is usually done by congressional staffers and includes things like answering questions about how to get certain government benefits or writing recommendation letters to West Point. Congressmen can also provide jobs to constituents, which is usually a good way to get them to vote for you. These are either government jobs, kind of rare these days, called patronage or indirect employment through government contracts for programs within a Congressman's district. These programs are called earmarks or pork barrel programs, and they are much less common now because Congress has decided not to use them any more, sort of. The second advantage that incumbents have is that they have a record of winning elections, which if you think about it, is pretty obvious. Being a proven winner makes it easier for a congressmen to raise money, which helps them win, and long term incumbents tend to be more powerful in Congress which makes it even easier for them to raise money and win. The Constitution give incumbents one structural advantage too. Each elected congressman is allowed $100,000 and free postage to send out election materials. This is called the franking privilege. It's not so clear how great an advantage this is in the age of the internet, but at least according to the book The Victory Lab, direct mail from candidates can be surprisingly effective. How real is this incumbency advantage? Well if you look at the numbers, it seems pretty darn real. Over the past 60 years, almost 90% of members of The House of Representatives got re-elected. The Senate has been even more volatile, but even at the low point in 1980 more than 50% of sitting senators got to keep their jobs. Thanks, Thought Bubble. You're so great. So those are some of the features of congressional elections. Now, if you'll permit me to get a little politically sciencey, I'd like to try to explain why elections are so important to the way that Congressmen and Senators do their jobs. In 1974, political scientist David Mayhew published a book in which he described something he called "The Electoral Connection." This was the idea that Congressmen were primarily motivated by the desire to get re-elected, which intuitively makes a lot of sense, even though I'm not sure what evidence he had for this conclusion. Used to be able to get away with that kind of thing I guess, clearly David may-not-hew to the rules of evidence, pun [rim shot], high five, no. Anyway Mayhew's research methodology isn't as important as his idea itself because The Electoral Connection provides a frame work for understanding congressman's activities. Mayhew divided representatives' behaviors and activities into three categories. The first is advertising; congressmen work to develop their personal brand so that they are recognizable to voters. Al D'Amato used to be know in New York as Senator Pothole, because he was able to bring home so much pork that he could actually fix New York's streets. Not by filling them with pork, money, its money, remember pork barrel spending? The second activity is credit claiming; Congressmen get things done so that they can say they got them done. A lot of case work and especially pork barrel spending are done in the name of credit claiming. Related to credit claiming, but slightly different, is position taking. This means making a public judgmental statement on something likely to be of interest to voters. Senators can do this through filibusters. Representatives can't filibuster, but they can hold hearings, publicly supporting a hearing is a way of associating yourself with an idea without having to actually try to pass legislation. And of course they can go on the TV, especially on Sunday talk shows. What's a TV, who even watches TV? Now the idea of The Electoral Connection doesn't explain every action a member of Congress takes; sometimes they actually make laws to benefit the public good or maybe solve problems, huh, what an idea! But Mayhew's idea gives us a way of thinking about Congressional activity, an analytical lens that connects what Congressmen actually do with how most of us understand Congressmen, through elections. So the next time you see a Congressmen call for a hearing on a supposed horrible scandal or read about a Senator threatening to filibuster a policy that may have significant popular support, ask yourself, "Is this Representative claiming credit or taking a position, and how will this build their brand?" In other words: what's the electoral connection and how will whatever they're doing help them get elected? This might feel a little cynical, but the reality is Mayhew's thesis often seems to fit with today's politics. Thanks for watching, see you next week. Vote for me; I'm on the TV. I'm not -- I'm on the YouTube. Crash Course: Government and Politics is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Support for Crash Course US Government comes from Voqal. Voqal supports nonprofits that use technology and media to advance social equity. Learn more about their mission and initiatives at Voqal.org. Crash Course is made by all of these nice people. Thanks for watching. That guy isn't nice.

Contents

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Texas, 2016[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Republican 4,877,605 57.19% 25 25 0
Democratic 3,160,535 37.06% 11 11 0
Libertarian 360,066 4.22% 0 0 0
Green 130,254 1.53% 0 0 0
Write-In 66 <0.01% 0 0 -
Totals 8,528,526 100.00% 36 36

District 1

The incumbent is Republican Louie Gohmert, who has represented the district since 2004. He was re-elected with 77% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+24. He faced a primary challenge from two competitors: Simon Winston, and Anthony Culler. Democrat Shirley McKellar, who lost to Gohmert in 2012 and 2014, will run for the district's seat again.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 96,313 82.0
Republican Simon Winston 16,335 13.9
Republican Anthony Culler 4,879 4.1
Total votes 117,527 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Shirley J. McKellar 17,139 100.0
Total votes 17,139 100.0

General election

Texas's 1st congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Louie Gohmert (incumbent) 192,434 73.9
Democratic Shirley J. McKellar 62,847 24.1
Libertarian Phil Gray 5,062 2.0
Independent Renee Culler 66 0.0
Total votes 260,409 100.0
Republican hold

District 2

The incumbent is Republican Ted Poe, who has represented the district since 2004. He was re-elected with 68% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+16. He was unchallenged in the primary. Democrat Pat Bryan will run for the district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Poe (incumbent) 75,404 100.0
Total votes 75,404 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat Bryan 25,814 100.0
Total votes 25,814 100.0

General election

Texas's 2nd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ted Poe (incumbent) 168,692 60.6
Democratic Pat Bryan 100,231 36.0
Libertarian James B. Veasaw 6,429 2.3
Green Joshua Darr 2,884 1.1
Total votes 278,236 100.0
Republican hold

District 3

The incumbent is Republican Sam Johnson, who has represented the district since 1991. He was re-elected with 82% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+17.

State Representative Scott Turner is a potential Republican candidate whenever Johnson retires.[5]

Democrats Adam Bell and Michael Filak ran in the Democratic primary. Bell won the nomination to oppose Johnson in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 65,451 74.6
Republican John Calvin Slavens 10,043 11.5
Republican Keith L. Thurgood 7,173 8.2
Republican David Cornette 5,037 5.7
Total votes 87,704 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Bell 14,270 60.3
Democratic Michael Filak 9,395 39.7
Total votes 23,665 100.0

General election

Texas's 3rd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Johnson (incumbent) 193,684 61.2
Democratic Adam P. Bell 109,420 34.6
Libertarian Scott Jameson 10,448 3.3
Green Paul Blair 2,915 0.9
Total votes 316,467 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The incumbent, Republican John Ratcliffe, represented the district since 2014. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Lou Gigliotti, and Ray Hall. Ratcliffe won the primary runoff with 66.59% of the vote.[6] No Democrat filed to run.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe (incumbent) 77,254 68.0
Republican Lou Gigliotti 23,939 21.1
Republican Ray Hall 12,353 10.9
Total votes 113,546 100.0

General election

Texas's 4th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Ratcliffe (incumbent) 216,643 88.0
Libertarian Cody Wommack 29,577 12.0
Total votes 246,220 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The incumbent is Republican Jeb Hensarling, who has represented the district since 2012. He was re-elected with 85% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+17. He was unchallenged in the primary. There is no Democrat running.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Hensarling (incumbent) 73,143 100.0
Total votes 73,143 100.0

General election

Texas's 5th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeb Hensarling (incumbent) 155,469 80.6
Libertarian Ken Ashby 37,406 19.4
Total votes 192,875 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The incumbent is Republican Joe Barton, who has represented the district since 1985. He was re-elected in 2014 with 61% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+11. His reelection margin increased to 68.7 percent in the 2016 primary.

Software engineer David Cozad, who was the Democratic nominee in 2010 and 2014, is running again.[7] Democrats Ruby Faye Woolridge, Jeffrey Roseman, and Don Jaquess ran in the Democratic primary which Ruby Faye Woolridge won with 68.65%.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 55,285 68.6
Republican Steven Fowler 17,960 22.3
Republican Collin Baker 7,292 9.1
Total votes 80,537 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruby Faye Woolridge 23,294 69.7
Democratic Jeffrey Roseman 5,993 17.9
Democratic Don Jaquess 4,132 12.4
Total votes 33,419 100.0

General election

Texas's 6th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Joe Barton (incumbent) 159,444 58.4
Democratic Ruby Faye Woolridge 106,667 39.0
Green Darrel Smith Jr. 7,185 2.6
Total votes 273,296 100.0
Republican hold

District 7

The incumbent, Republican John Culberson, represented the district since 2001. Culberson won the primary with 57% of the vote where he faced James Lloyd and Maria Espinoza. Energy attorney and nominee for the seat in 2012 and 2014, James Cargas will challenge Culberson in the general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson (incumbent) 44,290 57.3
Republican James Lloyd 19,217 24.9
Republican Maria Espinoza 13,793 17.8
Total votes 77,300 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Cargas 24,190 100.0
Total votes 24,190 100.0

General election

Texas's 7th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Culberson (incumbent) 143,542 56.2
Democratic James Cargas 111,991 43.8
Total votes 255,533 100.0
Republican hold

District 8

The incumbent, Republican Kevin Brady, represented the district since 1997. Brady was challenged again in the primary by Craig McMichael along with former State Representative Steve Toth and Andre Dean; Brady won with 53.4 percent of the vote and is unopposed in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 65,059 53.4
Republican Steve Toth 45,436 37.3
Republican Craig McMichael 6,050 5.0
Republican Andre Dean 5,233 4.3
Total votes 121,778 100.0

General election

Texas's 8th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kevin Brady (incumbent) 236,379 100.0
Total votes 236,379 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The incumbent, Democrat Al Green, represented the district since 2004. Green was unchallenged in the primary. Jeff Martin is the Republican candidate in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jeff Martin 11,696 100.0
Total votes 11,696 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 44,487 100.0
Total votes 44,487 100.0

General election

Texas's 9th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Al Green (incumbent) 152,032 80.6
Republican Jeff Martin 36,491 19.4
Total votes 188,523 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

The incumbent, Republican Michael McCaul, has represented the district since 2005. Democrat Tawana Walter-Cadien, who was the democrat nominee in 2014, and Scot Gallaher ran in the Democratic primary. Tawana Walter-Cadien won the Democratic nomination with 51.7 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 76,646 100.0
Total votes 76,646 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tawana Walter-Cadien 22,660 52.0
Democratic Scot Gallaher 20,961 48.0
Total votes 43,621 100.0

General election

Texas's 10th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael McCaul (incumbent) 179,221 57.3
Democratic Tawana W. Cadien 120,170 38.5
Libertarian Bill Kelsey 13,209 4.2
Total votes 312,600 100.0
Republican hold

District 11

The incumbent, Republican Mike Conaway, has represented the district since 2005. He was re-elected with 90% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+31. There is no Democrat running for this district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway (incumbent) 101,056 100.0
Total votes 101,056 100.0

General election

Texas's 11th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Conaway (incumbent) 201,871 89.5
Libertarian Nicholas Landholt 23,677 10.5
Total votes 225,548 100.0
Republican hold

District 12

The incumbent, Republican Kay Granger, has represented the district since 1997. She was re-elected with 71% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+19. Democrat Bill Bradshaw will run for the district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (incumbent) 87,329 100
Total votes 87,329 100
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Bradshaw 25,839 100.0
Total votes 25,839 100.0

General election

Texas's 12th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kay Granger (incumbent) 196,482 69.4
Democratic Bill Bradshaw 76,029 26.9
Libertarian Ed Colliver 10,604 3.7
Total votes 283,115 100.0
Republican hold

District 13

The incumbent, Republican Mac Thornberry, has represented the district since 1995. He was re-elected with 84% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+32. There is no Democrat running for this district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry (incumbent) 98,033 100.0
Total votes 98,033 100.0

General election

Texas's 13th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mac Thornberry (incumbent) 199,050 90.0
Libertarian Calvin DeWeese 14,725 6.6
Green H.F. "Rusty" Tomlinson 7,467 3.4
Total votes 221,242 100.0
Republican hold

District 14

The incumbent, Republican Randy Weber, represented the district since 2013. Keith Casey ran in the Republican primary; Weber won with 84.03% of the vote. Michael Cole is Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 57,869 84.0
Republican Keith Casey 10,988 16.0
Total votes 68,857 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Michael Cole 28,731 100.0
Total votes 28,731 100.0

General election

Texas's 14th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Randy Weber (incumbent) 160,631 61.9
Democratic Michael Cole 99,054 38.1
Total votes 259,685 100.0
Republican hold

District 15

The incumbent is Democrat Rubén Hinojosa, who has represented the district since 1997. He was re-elected in 2014 with 54% of the vote and the district has a PVI of D+5. Hinojosa is retiring.[8]

Six Democrats are running for the seat: law student Ruben Ramirez, former Hildago County Democratic Party Chairwoman Dolly Elizondo, attorney Vicente González, Edinburg School Board Member Juan "Sonny" Palacios Jr., former Hidalgo County Commissioner Joel Quintanilla, and accountant Randy Sweeten.[8] No candidate received 50% of the vote so the top two candidates, Vicente Gonzalez and Juan "Sonny" Palacios, Jr. faced a Runoff Election, which Gonzales won by a landslide margin of 66% - 34%.

Former Rio Grande City Mayor Ruben Villarreal, Pastor Tim Westley, and Edinburg School Board Member Xavier Salinas are running for the Republican Party nomination.[8] No candidate received 50% of the vote so the top two candidates, Tim Westley and Ruben Villarreal will face a Runoff Election.

On May 24, 2016, Gonzalez defeated Palacios, for the Democratic nomination, Tim Westley defeated Ruben Villarreal, for the Republican Nomination. They went on to face Vanessa Tijerina, the Green Party nominee, and the Libertarian nominee, Ross Lynn Leone.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Westley 13,164 45.0
Republican Ruben Villarreal 9,349 32.0
Republican Xavier Salinas 6,734 23.0
Total votes 29,247 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vicente González 22,151 42.2
Democratic Juan "Sonny" Palacios, Jr. 9,913 19.0
Democratic Dolly Elizondo 8,888 16.9
Democratic Joel Quintanilla 6,152 11.7
Democratic Ruben Ramirez 3,149 6.0
Democratic Rance G "Randy" Sweeten 2,224 4.2
Total votes 52,477 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary results[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tim Westley 1,384 50.5
Republican Ruben Villarreal 1,355 49.5
Total votes 2,739 100.0
Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vicente Gonzalez 16,071 65.7
Democratic Juan "Sonny" Palacios, Jr. 8,379 34.3
Total votes 24,450 100.0

General election

Texas's 15th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Vicente Gonzalez 101,712 57.3
Republican Tim Westley 66,877 37.7
Green Vanessa S. Tijerina 5,448 3.1
Libertarian Ross Lynn Leone 3,442 1.9
Total votes 177,479 100.0
Democratic hold

District 16

The incumbent, Democrat Beto O'Rourke, has represented the district since 2013. With 85.6 percent of the vote, he defeated Ben Mendoza in the primary election.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke (incumbent) 40,051 85.6
Democratic Ben Mendoza 6,749 14.4
Total votes 46,800 100.0

General election

Texas's 16th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Beto O'Rourke (incumbent) 150,228 85.7
Libertarian Jaime O. Perez 17,491 10.0
Green Mary L. Gourdoux 7,510 4.3
Total votes 175,229 100.0
Democratic hold

District 17

The incumbent, Republican Bill Flores, represented the district since 2011. Flores won the primary with 72.45% of the vote against Ralph Patterson and Kaleb Sims.[2] Democrat William Matta will run in the election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores (incumbent) 60,502 72.4
Republican Ralph Patterson 15,411 18.5
Republican Kaleb Sims 7,634 9.1
Total votes 83,547 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Matta 27,639 100.0
Total votes 27,639 100.0

General election

Texas's 17th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bill Flores (incumbent) 149,417 60.8
Democratic William Matta 86,603 35.2
Libertarian Clark Patterson 9,708 4.0
Total votes 245,728 100.0
Republican hold

District 18

The incumbent, Democrat Sheila Jackson Lee, represented the district since 1995. Republicans Lori Bartley, Reggie Gonzales, Sharon Joy Fisher and Ava Pate ran in the primary election. No candidate achieved 50% of the vote, so Lori Bartley and Reggie Gonzales will face each other in the Runoff.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lori Bartley 5,691 33.7
Republican Reggie Gonzales 5,587 33.1
Republican Sharon Joy Fisher 4,414 26.1
Republican Ava Pate 1,204 7.1
Total votes 16,896 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 46,113 100.0
Total votes 46,113 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary results[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lori Bartley 1,491 57.6
Republican Reggie Gonzales 1,096 42.4
Total votes 2,587 100.0

General election

Texas's 18th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sheila Jackson Lee (incumbent) 150,157 73.5
Republican Lori Bartley 48,306 23.6
Green Thomas Kleven 5,845 2.9
Total votes 204,308 100.0
Democratic hold

District 19

The incumbent is Republican Randy Neugebauer, who has represented the district since 2003. He was re-elected in 2014 with 77 percent of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+26.

Lubbock Mayor Glen Robertson announced in January 2015 that he was considering running against Neugebauer in the 2016 Republican primary. He cited unhappiness with what he said was Neugebauer's failure to bolster the cotton industry.[11] In March, Robertson said that he would not run for Congress and instead run once more for mayor.[12]

After Neugebauer decided to retire, Robertson entered the congressional race and withdrew from consideration for another term as mayor. None of the nine candidates obtained a majority in the Republican primary on March 1. Robertson led the field and now meets in a runoff election on May 24 Jodey Arrington, a former official in the George W. Bush administration and a former vice chancellor at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. Arrington had trailed Robertson by fewer than one thousand votes.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Glen Robertson 27,868 26.8
Republican Jodey Arrington 27,013 25.9
Republican Michael Bob Starr 22,303 21.4
Republican Donald R. May 9,616 9.2
Republican Greg Garrett 8,309 8.0
Republican Jason Corley 2,558 2.5
Republican DeRenda Warren 2,323 2.2
Republican Don Parrish 2,197 2.1
Republican John C. Key 1,959 1.9
Total votes 104,146 100.0

Runoff results

Republican primary results[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jodey Arrington 25,322 53.7
Republican Glen Robertson 21,832 46.3
Total votes 47,154 100.0

General election

Texas's 19th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jodey Arrington 176,314 86.7
Libertarian Troy Bonar 17,376 8.5
Green Mark Lawson 9,785 4.8
Total votes 203,475 100.0
Republican hold

District 20

The incumbent, Democrat Joaquín Castro, has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 76% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of D+6. There is no Republican running for this district's seat.

Primary results

Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquín Castro (incumbent) 42,163 100.0
Total votes 42,163 100.0

General election

Texas's 20th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joaquin Castro (incumbent) 149,640 79.7
Libertarian Jeffrey C. Blunt 29,055 15.5
Green Paul Pipkin 8,974 4.8
Total votes 187,669 100.0
Democratic hold

District 21

The incumbent is Republican Lamar S. Smith, who has represented the district since 1987. The district has a PVI of R+11.

Lamar S. Smith is running for re-election and will face Matt McCall, John Murphy and Todd Phelps in the Republican primary. Thomas Wakely and Tejas Vakil are running for the Democratic nomination. Wakely won the Democratic nomination with 58.99% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar S. Smith (incumbent) 69,866 60.1
Republican Matt McCall 33,624 28.9
Republican Todd Phelps 6,597 5.7
Republican John Murphy 6,200 5.3
Total votes 116,287 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom Wakely 29,632 59.0
Democratic Tejas Vakil 20,595 41.0
Total votes 50,227 100.0

General election

Texas's 21st congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lamar S. Smith (incumbent) 202,967 57.0
Democratic Tom Wakely 129,765 36.5
Libertarian Mark Loewe 14,735 4.1
Green Antonio "Tony" Diaz 8,564 2.4
Total votes 356,031 100.0
Republican hold

District 22

The incumbent, Republican Pete Olson, represented the district since 2009. Democrats Mark Gibson, who lost in his party's primary in 2014, and A. R. Hassan ran for their party's nomination; Gibson won with this time with 76.16% of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson (incumbent) 73,375 100.0
Total votes 73,375 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Gibson 23,084 76.2
Democratic A. R. Hassan 7,226 23.8
Total votes 30,310 100.0

General election

Texas's 22nd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Olson (incumbent) 181,864 59.5
Democratic Mark Gibson 123,679 40.5
Total votes 305,543 100.0
Republican hold

District 23

The incumbent Republican, Will Hurd of Helotes near San Antonio, has represented the district since 2015. He was elected in 2014, when he narrowly unseated the then Democratic incumbent Pete Gallego of Alpine. The district has a PVI of R+3.

Gallego faces Hurd in a rematch in the November 8 general election.[13]

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd (incumbent) 39,870 82.2
Republican William "Hart" Peterson 8,628 17.8
Total votes 48,498 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pete Gallego 43,223 88.4
Democratic Lee Keenen 5,688 11.6
Total votes 48,911 100.0

General election

Texas's 23rd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Will Hurd (incumbent) 110,577 48.3
Democratic Pete P. Gallego 107,526 47.0
Libertarian Ruben S. Corvalan 10,862 4.7
Total votes 228,965 100.0
Republican hold

District 24

The incumbent, Republican Kenny Marchant, has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+13. Democrat Jan McDowell will run for the district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant (incumbent) 67,412 100.0
Total votes 67,412 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jan McDowell 27,803 100.0
Total votes 27,803 100.0

General election

Texas's 24th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kenny Marchant (incumbent) 154,845 56.2
Democratic Jan McDowell 108,389 39.3
Libertarian Mike Kolls 8,625 3.1
Green Kevin McCormick 3,776 1.4
Total votes 275,635 100.0
Republican hold

District 25

The incumbent, Republican Roger Williams, has represented the district since 2013. He was re-elected with 60% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+12. Democrat Kathi Thomas will run for the district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 83,965 100.0
Total votes 83,965 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kathi Thomas 44,633 100.0
Total votes 44,633 100.0

General election

Texas's 25th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Williams (incumbent) 180,988 58.4
Democratic Kathi Thomas 117,073 37.7
Libertarian Loren Marc Schneiderman 12,135 3.9
Total votes 310,196 100.0
Republican hold

District 26

The incumbent, Republican Michael C. Burgess, represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Joel A. Krause and Micah Beebe; Burgess won with 79.35% of the vote. Eric Mauck is the Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 73,607 79.4
Republican Joel A. Krause 13,201 14.2
Republican Micah Beebe 5,942 6.4
Total votes 92,750 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eric Mauck 24,816 100.0
Total votes 24,816 100.0

General election

Texas's 26th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Michael C. Burgess (incumbent) 211,730 66.4
Democratic Eric Mauck 94,507 29.6
Libertarian Mark Boler 12,843 4.0
Total votes 319,080 100.0
Republican hold

District 27

The incumbent is Republican Blake Farenthold, who has represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected in 2014 with 64% of the vote and the district has a PVI of R+13.

John Harrington, president and founder of firearms retailer Shield Tactical, announced a primary challenge of Farenthold in May 2015.[14] The Texas Tribune reported that Harrington had the capacity to self-fund a race.[15] In August 2015 he announced that he was withdrawing because of lingering effects of a motorcycle crash.[16]

Former State Representative Solomon Ortiz, Jr., considered running for the Democratic nomination[17] Corpus Christi Mayor Nelda Martinez had considered running, but later announced that she would not.[17]

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold (incumbent) 42,195 55.9
Republican Gregg Deeb 33,280 44.1
Total votes 75,475 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raul (Roy) Barrera 15,939 50.3
Democratic Ray Madrigal 11,157 35.2
Democratic Wayne Raasch 4,570 14.5
Total votes 31,666 100.0

General election

Texas's 27th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blake Farenthold (incumbent) 142,251 61.7
Democratic Raul (Roy) Barrera 88,329 38.3
Total votes 230,580 100.0
Republican hold

District 28

The incumbent, Democrat Henry Cuellar, has represented the district since 2005. Cuellar was challenged by Republican-turned-Democrat William R. Hayward in the primary, in which Cuellar prevailed with 89.8 percent of the vote. Zeffen Hardin of San Antonio is the Republican nominee in the November 8 general election.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Zeffen Hardin 21,614 100.0
Total votes 21,614 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 49,993 89.8
Democratic William R. Hayward 5,683 10.2
Total votes 55,676 100.0

General election

Texas's 28th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Henry Cuellar (incumbent) 122,086 66.2
Republican Zeffen Hardin 57,740 31.3
Green Michael D. Cary 4,616 2.5
Total votes 184,442 100.0
Democratic hold

District 29

The incumbent, Democrat Gene Green, represented the district since 1993. Green was challenged by Adrian Garcia and Dominique Garcia, but won the primary with 58% of the vote.

Julio Garza, and Robert Schafranek ran in the Republican primary, which Garza won with 59 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Julio Garza 7,421 59.1
Republican Robert Schafranek 5,139 40.9
Total votes 12,560 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green (incumbent) 17,814 57.4
Democratic Adrian Garcia 11,972 38.6
Democratic Dominique Garcia 1,224 4.0
Total votes 31,010 100.0

General election

Texas's 29th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Green (incumbent) 95,649 72.5
Republican Julio Garza 31,646 24.0
Libertarian N. Ruben Perez 3,234 2.4
Green James Partsch-Galvan 1,453 1.1
Total votes 131,982 100.0
Democratic hold

District 30

The incumbent, Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, represented the district since 1993. State Representative Barbara Mallory Caraway, who was a candidate for the seat in 2012 and 2014, challenged Johnson in the Democratic primary for a third time; Brandon J. Vance also ran in the primary. Johnson won with 69.42 percent of the vote. Republican Charles Lingerfelt is the Republican nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles Lingerfelt 14,234 100.0
Total votes 14,234 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 44,527 69.4
Democratic Barbara Mallory Caraway 15,273 23.8
Democratic Brandon J. Vance 4,339 6.8
Total votes 64,139 100.0

General election

Texas's 30th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Eddie Bernice Johnson (incumbent) 170,502 77.9
Republican Charles Lingerfelt 41,518 19.0
Libertarian Jarrett R. Woods 4,753 2.2
Green Thom Prentice 2,053 0.9
Total votes 218,826 100.0
Democratic hold

District 31

The incumbent, Republican John Carter, has represented the district since 2003. He was challenged in the Republican primary by Mike Sweeney but won the primary with 71.28 percent of the vote.

Democrat Mike Clark is the Democratic nominee.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 62,817 71.3
Republican Mike Sweeney 25,306 28.7
Total votes 88,123 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Clark 28,002 100.0
Total votes 28,002 100.0

General election

Texas's 31st congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Carter (incumbent) 166,060 58.3
Democratic Mike Clark 103,852 36.5
Libertarian Scott Ballard 14,676 5.2
Total votes 284,588 100.0
Republican hold

District 32

The incumbent, Republican Pete Sessions, represented the district since 2003, and previously represented the 5th district from 1997 to 2003. Russ Ramsland and Paul Brown challenged Sessions for the Republican nomination; Sessions won with 61 percent of the vote. No Democratic filed to run.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions (incumbent) 49,813 61.4
Republican Russ Ramsland 19,203 23.7
Republican Paul Brown 9,488 11.7
Republican Cherie Myint Roughneen 2,601 3.2
Total votes 81,105 100.0

General election

Texas's 32nd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Pete Sessions (incumbent) 162,868 71.1
Libertarian Ed Rankin 43,490 19.0
Green Gary Stuard 22,813 9.9
Total votes 229,171 100.0
Republican hold

District 33

The incumbent, Democrat Marc Veasey, represented the district since 2013. Marc Veasey was challenged in the Democratic primary by Carlos Quintanilla and won with 63 percent of the vote.

M. Mark Mitchell and Bruce Chadwick ran in the Republican primary, which Mitchell won with 52.39 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican M. Mark Mitchell 6,411 52.4
Republican Bruce Chadwick 5,831 47.6
Total votes 12,242 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 20,526 63.4
Democratic Carlos Quintanilla 11,846 36.6
Total votes 32,372 100.0

General election

Texas's 33rd congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marc Veasey (incumbent) 93,147 73.7
Republican M. Mark Mitchell 33,222 26.3
Total votes 126,369 100.0
Democratic hold

District 34

The incumbent, Democrat Filemon Vela, Jr., represented the district since 2013. Republicans Rey Gonzalez, Jr. and William "Willie" Vaden ran in the Republican primary, which Gonzalez won with 50.56 percent of the vote.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rey Gonzalez, Jr. 12,532 50.6
Republican William "Willie" Vaden 12,253 49.4
Total votes 24,785 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon Vela, Jr. (incumbent) 41,414 100.0
Total votes 41,414 100.0

General election

Texas's 34th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Filemon Vela, Jr. (incumbent) 104,638 62.7
Republican Rey Gonzalez, Jr. 62,323 37.3
Total votes 166,961 100.0
Democratic hold

District 35

The incumbent, Democrat Lloyd Doggett, has represented the district since 2013. He was elected with 63% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of D+11. Republican Susan Narvaiz will run for the district's seat.

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Susan Narvaiz 22,549 100.0
Total votes 22,549 100.0
Democratic primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 41,189 100.0
Total votes 41,189 100.0

General election

Texas's 35th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Lloyd Doggett (incumbent) 124,612 63.1
Republican Susan Narvaiz 62,384 31.6
Libertarian Rhett Rosenquest Smith 6,504 3.2
Green Scott Trimble 4,076 2.1
Total votes 197,576 100.0
Democratic hold

District 36

The incumbent is Republican Brian Babin, who has represented the district since 2015, when Steve Stockman vacated the seat after a failed campaign for the United States Senate. He was elected with 76 percent of the vote in 2014. The district has a PVI of R+25.

Babin is running for re-election to a second term.[18] Dwayne Stovall, a bridge construction contractor, school board member from Cleveland, and an unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2014 and the Texas House of Representatives in 2012, announced that he would challenge Babin for the Republican U.S. House nomination. Stovall, however, suspended his campaign in December 2015.[19]

Primary results

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin (incumbent) 80,649 100.0
Total votes 80,649 100.0

General election

Texas's 36th congressional district, 2016 [4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Babin (incumbent) 193,675 88.6
Green Hal J. Ridley Jr. 24,890 11.4
Total votes 218,565 100.0
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ "1992 - Current ELECTION HISTORY". Secretary of State of Texas. Archived from the original on November 8, 2006. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai "2016 Primary Election Official Results, March 1, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "2016 Primary Election Official Results, March 1, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj "2016 General Election, 11/8/2016". Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved December 5, 2016.
  5. ^ "San Antonio Republican Joe Straus re-elected speaker with all El Paso votes". El Paso Times. January 13, 2015. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  6. ^ "Ratcliffe defeats Gigliotti in race for U.S. House seat". HeraldDemocrat.com. Retrieved March 2, 2016.
  7. ^ Recio, Maria; Tinsley, Anna M. (March 7, 2015). "PoliTex: Kay Granger chooses work over recognition". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  8. ^ a b c http://www.texastribune.org/2016/02/16/scrambled-race-replace-hinojosa/
  9. ^ a b c "2016 Primary Runoff Election Unofficial Results, March 24, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Archived from the original on June 9, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  10. ^ "2016 Primary Runoff Election Unofficial Results, March 24, 2016". Texas Secretary of State. Archived from the original on June 16, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  11. ^ "Lubbock mayor considering bid for 19th congressional seat". KCBD. January 26, 2015. Retrieved January 27, 2015.
  12. ^ "Robertson not running for Congress; will seek another term as mayor". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. March 3, 2015. Retrieved April 17, 2015.
  13. ^ Livingston, Abby (April 2, 2015). "Gallego to Seek Rematch With U.S. Rep. Hurd". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved April 3, 2015.
  14. ^ Stakes, Justin (May 8, 2015). "Shield Tactical's John W. Harrington is Running for Congress". Ammoland. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  15. ^ Livingston, Abby (June 21, 2015). "3 Texas Congressmen Anticipating Tea Party Challengers". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  16. ^ "US Congressional candidate from Shiner withdraws". The Victoria Advocate. August 12, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  17. ^ a b Livingston, Abby (March 27, 2015). "Former Congressman's Son Mulls Challenging Farenthold". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  18. ^ "Dr. Brian Babin announces re-election for Congress for Texas' 36th Congressional District". The Orange Leader. November 27, 2015. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  19. ^ Brashier, Vanessa (December 2, 2015). "Stovall dropping out of race for Congressional District 36". The Deer Park Broadcaster. Retrieved December 14, 2015.

External links

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