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Minnesota's 1st congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Minnesota's 1st congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries since January 3, 2023
Representative
  Brad Finstad
RNew Ulm
Area13,322[1] sq mi (34,500 km2)
Distribution
  • 62.53% urban[2]
  • 37.47% rural
Population (2021)691,635[3]
Median household
income
$70,349[4]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+7[5]

Minnesota's 1st congressional district extends across southern Minnesota from the border with South Dakota to the border with Wisconsin. It is a primarily rural district built on a strong history of agriculture, though this is changing rapidly due to strong population growth in the Rochester combined statistical area. The district is also home to several of Minnesota's major mid-sized cities, including Rochester, Mankato, Winona, Austin, Owatonna, Albert Lea, New Ulm, and Worthington. It was represented by Republican Jim Hagedorn of Blue Earth from 2019 until his death on February 17, 2022.[6]

From early statehood until after the 2000 census, the district covered only southeast Minnesota. During the 20th century, it was generally considered solidly Republican, but it became more of a swing district in the late 20th to early 21st century. In 2004, John Kerry received 47% of the vote in the district. In 2006, Republican Representative Gil Gutknecht lost to Democrat Tim Walz. In March 2017, Walz announced that he would not run for reelection to Congress, and instead would run for governor of Minnesota. On paper, the district leans Republican, with a CPVI of R+8, but recent elections have been among the closest in the nation, won by less than a single percentage point in both 2016 and 2018.[5]

Election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
2000 President George W. Bush 49 - Al Gore 45%
2004 President George W. Bush 51 - John Kerry 47%
2008 President Barack Obama 51 - John McCain 47%
2012 President Barack Obama 50 - Mitt Romney 48%
Senate Amy Klobuchar 62 - Kurt Bills 32%
2014 Governor Jeff Johnson 48 - Mark Dayton 46%
Attorney General Lori Swanson 48 - Scott Newman 43%
Secretary of State Dan Severson 50 - Steve Simon 42%
State Auditor Rebecca Otto 45 - Randy Gilbert 45%
2016 President Donald Trump 53 - Hillary Clinton 38%
2018 Governor Tim Walz 50 - Jeff Johnson 47%
Attorney General Doug Wardlow 52 - Keith Ellison 42%
Senate Amy Klobuchar 54 - Jim Newberger 42%
Senate (special) Karin Housley 49 - Tina Smith 46%
Secretary of State John Howe 50 - Steve Simon 45%
State Auditor Pam Myhra 50 - Julie Blaha 43%
2020 President Donald Trump 54 - Joe Biden 44%

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District established March 4, 1863
William Windom, Brady-Handy photo portrait, ca1870-1880.jpg

William Windom
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1869
38th
39th
40th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
Retired.
1863–1873
[data unknown/missing]
Morton S. Wilkinson - Brady-Handy.jpg

Morton S. Wilkinson
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
41st Elected in 1868.
Lost renomination.
Mark Dunnell - Brady-Handy.jpg

Mark H. Dunnell
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1883
42nd
43rd
44th
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1870.
Re-elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
1873–1883
Blue Earth, Cottonwood, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Jackson, Martin, Mower, Murray, Nobles, Olmsted, Pipestone, Rock, Steele, Waseca, Watonwan, and Winona
Milo White (Minnesota Congressman).jpg

Milo White
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Retired.
1883–1893
Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Steele, Wabasha, and Winona
ThomasWilson1899.jpg

Thomas Wilson
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
Lost re-election.
Mark Dunnell - Brady-Handy.jpg

Mark H. Dunnell
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st Elected in 1888.
Lost re-election.
William Henry Harries (Minnesota Congressman).jpg

William H. Harries
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Lost re-election.
James Albertus Tawney.jpg

James Albertus Tawney
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1911
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
Elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Lost renomination.
1893–1933
Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and Winona
SydneyAnderson.jpg

Sydney Anderson
Republican March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1925
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
Elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Retired.
AllenJFurlow.jpg

Allen J. Furlow
Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1929
69th
70th
Elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Lost renomination.
Victor Christgau (Minnesota Congressman).png

Victor Christgau
Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1933
71st
72nd
Elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the at-large district and lost re-election as an independent.
District inactive March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd All members elected at-large.
AugustAndresen.jpg

August H. Andresen
Republican January 3, 1935 –
January 14, 1958
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Died.
1935–1963
Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and Winona
Vacant January 14, 1958 –
February 18, 1958
85th
Al Quie 1977 congressional photo.jpg

Al Quie
Republican February 18, 1958 –
January 3, 1979
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
Elected to finish Andresen's term.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Retired to run for Governor of Minnesota.
1963–1973
Dakota, Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, and Winona
1973–1983
Dodge, Fillmore, Goodhue, Houston, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, Washington, and Winona; parts of Dakota
Arlen Erdahl.jpg

Arlen Erdahl
Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1983
96th
97th
Elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Lost renomination.
Congressman Timothy Penny.jpg

Tim Penny
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1995
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired.
1983–1993
Blue Earth, Dodge, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and Winona; parts of Dakota, Goodhue, Le Sueur, and Scott
1993–1995
Blue Earth, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Houston, Le Sueur, Mower, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and Winona; parts of Dakota and Scott
Gil Gutknecht, official photo portrait, color.jpg

Gil Gutknecht
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2007
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Lost re-election.
1995–2003
Blue Earth, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Rice, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, and Winona; parts of Dakota, Le Sueur, Nicollet, and Scott
2003–2013
MN Congressional District 1.gif

Blue Earth, Brown, Cottonwood, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Jackson, Martin, Mower, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Pipestone, Rock, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, Watonwan, and Winona; parts of Le Sueur
Tim Walz official photo.jpg

Tim Walz
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2019
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired to run for Governor of Minnesota.
2013–2023
Minnesota US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Blue Earth, Brown, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Houston, Jackson, Le Sueur, Martin, Mower, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Rock, Steele, Waseca, Watonwan, and Winona; parts of Cottonwood and Rice
Jim Hagedorn, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg

Jim Hagedorn
Republican January 3, 2019 –
February 17, 2022
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Died.
Vacant February 17, 2022 –
August 12, 2022
117th
Brad Finstad 117th Congress.jpeg

Brad Finstad
Republican August 12, 2022 –
present
117th
118th
Elected to finish Hagedorn's term.
Re-elected in 2022.
2023–present
Minnesota's 1st congressional district (since 2023).svg

Blue Earth, Dodge, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Houston, Jackson, Martin, Mower, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Rock, Steele, Wabasha, Waseca, Watonwan, and Winona; parts of Brown and Rice

Recent elections

Graph of election results in Minnesota's 1st congressional district
2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 163,532 61 -
Democratic (DFL) Steve Andreasen 92,149 35 -
Green Gregory Mikkelson 9,954 4 -
2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 193,132 60 -1
Democratic (DFL) Leigh Pomeroy 115,088 35 -
Independence Gregory Mikkelson 15,569 5 -
2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz 141,622 53 -
Republican Gil Gutknecht (Incumbent) 126,487 47 -13
2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (Incumbent) 207,748 62.5 +9.5
Republican Brian J. Davis 109,446 32.9 -
Independence Gregory Mikkelson 14,903 4.5 -
2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (Incumbent) 122,390 49.4 -13.1
Republican Randy Demmer 109,261 44.1 +11.2
Independence Steven Wilson 13,243 5.3 +0.8
2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (Incumbent) 193,211 57.5 +8.1
Republican Allen Quist 142,164 42.3 -1.8
2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (Incumbent) 122,851 54.2 -3.3
Republican Jim Hagedorn 103,536 45.7 +3.4
2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic (DFL) Tim Walz (Incumbent) 169,076 50.4 -3.8
Republican Jim Hagedorn 166,527 49.6 +3.9
2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jim Hagedorn 146,202 50.1 +0.5
Democratic (DFL) Dan Feehan 144,891 49.7 -0.7
2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jim Hagedorn (incumbent) 179,234 48.6 -1.5
Democratic (DFL) Dan Feehan 167,890 45.5 -4.2
Grassroots—LC Bill Rood 21,448 5.8 N/A
Write-in 284 0.1 N/A
2022 Minnesota's 1st congressional district special election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Brad Finstad 59,788 50.7 +2.1
Democratic (DFL) Jeff Ettinger 55,155 46.8 +1.3
Legal Marijuana Now Richard Reisdorf 1,536 1.3 N/A
Grassroots—LC Haroun McClellan 865 0.7 -5.1
Write-in 535 0.5 +0.4
2022 United States House of Representatives elections in Minnesota, District 1
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Brad Finstad (incumbent) 159,621 53.8 +3.1
Democratic (DFL) Jeff Ettinger 125,457 42.3 -4.5
Legal Marijuana Now Richard Reisdorf 6,389 2.1 +0.8
Grassroots—LC Brian Abrahamson 4,943 1.7 +1.0
Write-in 137 0.1 N/A

See also

References

  1. ^ "Minnesota congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved April 2, 2007.
  2. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov.Public domain This article incorporates public domain material from this U.S government document.
  3. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  4. ^ "My Congressional District: Congressional District 1 (117th Congress), Minnesota". United States Census Bureau.
  5. ^ a b "2022 Cook PVI℠: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  6. ^ "Congressman Jim Hagedorn Dies: 'He Lived His Dream By Serving Others'". February 18, 2022. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  7. ^ "Results for All Congressional Districts". Minnesota Secretary of State. Retrieved November 25, 2020.

This page was last edited on 27 January 2023, at 23:28
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