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Minnesota's 8th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Minnesota's 8th congressional district
Minnesota US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
Minnesota's 8th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Pete Stauber
RHermantown
Area27,583[1] sq mi (71,440 km2)
Distribution
  • 61.53% rural[2]
  • 38.47% urban
Population (2019)671,346[3]
Median household
income
$61,659[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+10[4]
External image
image icon THIS govtrack.us MAP, is a useful representation of the 8th CD's borders, based on Google Maps.

Minnesota's 8th congressional district covers the northeastern part of Minnesota. It is anchored by Duluth, the state's fourth-largest city. It also includes most of the Mesabi & Vermilion iron ranges, and the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in the Superior National Forest. The district is best known for its mining, agriculture, tourism, and shipping industries.

For many decades, the district reliably voted Democratic, but in 2016, Republicans made strong gains and Donald Trump carried the district by a 15-point margin. In the 2018 midterm election, it was one of only three congressional districts in the country which flipped to Republican. The eastern part of the district (Carlton, Cook, Lake, and St. Louis counties) tends to vote Democratic while the rest of the district leans Republican.[5]

The district is represented by Republican Pete Stauber.[5][6]

The district is notable for being the last one assigned after both the 2010 and 2020 censuses. After the 2020 census in particular, in spite of early predictions that it would be eliminated, Minnesota held onto the district by a mere 89 people, beating out New York's 27th district for the last spot.[7]

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
James-adam-bede.jpg

James Bede
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1909
58th
59th
60th
Elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Lost renomination.
ClarenceBMiller.jpg

Clarence B. Miller
Republican March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1919
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost re-election.
Carss, William L..jpg

William Leighton Carss
Farmer–Labor March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost re-election as a Democrat.
OscarLarson.jpg

Oscar Larson
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1925
67th
68th
Elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Retired.
Carss, William L..jpg

William Leighton Carss
Farmer–Labor March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1929
69th
70th
Elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Lost re-election.
William Alvin Pittenger.jpg

William Alvin Pittenger
Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1933
71st
72nd
Elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the at-large district and lost re-election.
District inactive March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
73rd All members elected At-large on a general ticket
William Alvin Pittenger.jpg

William Alvin Pittenger
Republican January 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1937
74th Elected in 1934.
Lost re-election.
JohnTBernard.jpg

John Bernard
Farmer–Labor January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1939
75th Elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
William Alvin Pittenger.jpg

William Alvin Pittenger
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1947
76th
77th
78th
79th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
John Anton Blatnik.jpg

John Blatnik
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 1947 –
December 31, 1974
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
Elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Retired and resigned early.
Vacant December 31, 1974 –
January 3, 1975
93rd
Oberstarj.jpg

Jim Oberstar
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 2011
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Lost re-election.
Chip Cravaack, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg

Chip Cravaack
Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
112th Elected in 2010.
Lost re-election.
Rick Nolan 115th official photo.jpg

Rick Nolan
Democratic (DFL) January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2019
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired to run for Lt. Governor of Minnesota.
Pete Stauber official photo.jpg

Pete Stauber
Republican January 3, 2019 –
present
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent elections

Year Nominee Party Votes % Nominee Party Votes % Nominee Party Votes %
2002 Jim Oberstar Democratic 193,959 68.6 Bob Lemen Republican 88,423 31.2
2004 Jim Oberstar Democratic 228,509 65.2 Mark Groettum Republican 112,657 32.2 Van Presley Green 8,933 2.5
2006 Jim Oberstar Democratic 194,677 63.6 Rod Grams Republican 101,744 34.4 Harry Welty Unity 5,508 1.9
2008 Jim Oberstar Democratic 240,586 67.6 Michael Cummins Republican 114,588 32.2
2010 Jim Oberstar Democratic 129,072 46.6 Chip Cravaack Republican 133,479 48.2 Timothy Olson Independence 11,876 4.3
2012 Rick Nolan Democratic 192,748 54.5 Chip Cravaack Republican 161,113 45.5
2014 Rick Nolan Democratic 129,089 48.5 Stewart Mills III Republican 125,357 47.1 Ray Sandman Green 11,450 4.3
2016 Rick Nolan Democratic 178,893 50.2 Stewart Mills III Republican 176,821 49.6
2018 Joe Radinovich Democratic 141,972 45.2 Pete Stauber Republican 159,388 50.7 Ray Sandman Independence 12,741 4.1
2020 Quinn Nystrom Democratic 147,853 37.6 Pete Stauber Republican 223,432 56.7 Judith Schwartzbacker Grassroots 22,190 5.6

Election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
2000 President Al Gore 49 - George W. Bush 44%
2004 President John Kerry 53 - George W. Bush 46%
2008 President Barack Obama 53 - John McCain 45%
Senate Al Franken 52.3 - Norm Coleman 47.6%
2012 President Barack Obama 51.7 - Mitt Romney 46.2%
Senate Amy Klobuchar 65 - Kurt Bills 31%
2014 Senate Al Franken 54 - Mike McFadden 42%
2016 President Donald Trump 54.2 - Hillary Clinton 38.6%
2018 Senate Amy Klobuchar 53.7 - Jim Newberger 42.9%
Senate (special) Karin Housley 48.3 - Tina Smith 46.8%
Governor Jeff Johnson 48.9 - Tim Walz 47.1%
2020 President Donald Trump 56.3 - Joe Biden 41.7%

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013
2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "Minnesota congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area" (PDF). US Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved April 2, 2007.
  2. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ a b "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. US Census Bureau Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP).
  4. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Minnesota Election Results 2018: Live Midterm Map by County & Analysis". Retrieved November 7, 2018.
  6. ^ "Minnesota's 8th Congressional District election, 2016 - Ballotpedia". Retrieved November 14, 2016.
  7. ^ "Minnesota avoids losing House seat to New York by 89 people". The Ridgefield Press. April 26, 2021. Retrieved April 26, 2021.

This page was last edited on 21 July 2021, at 10:56
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