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Mississippi's 1st congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mississippi's 1st congressional district
Mississippi US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Mississippi's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Trent Kelly
RSaltillo
Area11,412 sq mi (29,560 km2)
Distribution
  • 61.64% rural
  • 38.36% urban
Population (2019)769,026[1]
Median household
income
$50,243[2]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVIR+18[3]

Mississippi's 1st congressional district is in the northeast corner of the state. It includes much of the northern portion of the state including Columbus, Oxford, Southaven, and Tupelo. One of the state's major universities, the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), is located within the district at Oxford.

The district includes Alcorn, Benton, Calhoun, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Clay, DeSoto, Itawamba, Lafayette, Lee, Lowndes, Marshall, Monroe, Pontotoc, Prentiss, Tate, Tippah, Tishomingo, Union, Webster, and Winston counties and a portion of Oktibbeha County.

From statehood to the election of 1846, Mississippi elected representatives at-large statewide on a general ticket.

The congressional seat has been held by Republican Trent Kelly who won a June, 2015 special election to fill the vacant seat previously held by Republican Alan Nunnelee who died February 6, 2015. In the November 2010 election, Nunnelee had defeated Democratic incumbent Travis Childers, Constitutionalist Gail Giaramita, Independent Conservative Party candidate Wally Pang of Batesville, Libertarian Harold Taylor, and Reformist Barbara Dale Washer.

Election results from presidential races

Year Office Result
2000 President Bush 60 – 38%
2004 President Bush 62 – 37%
2008 President McCain 61 – 38%
2012 President Romney 62 – 37%
2016 President Trump 65 – 32%
2020 President Trump 68 – 30%


List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1847
Jacob Thompson - Brady-Handy.jpg

Jacob Thompson
Democratic March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1851
30th
31st
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Lost re-election as a Southern Rights candidate.[4]
Benjamin Nabers Unionist March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1851.
Lost re-election as a Whig.
Daniel B. Wright Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1857
33rd
34th
Elected in 1853.
Re-elected in 1855.
Retired.
Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar II - Brady-Handy.jpg

Lucius Q. C. Lamar
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
December 20, 1860
35th
36th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Resigned to become a member of the secession convention of Mississippi.
Vacant December 1860 –
February 23, 1870
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
41st
Civil War and Reconstruction
GeorgeEHarris.jpg

George E. Harris
Republican February 23, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
Elected in 1869 to finish the term and to the next term.
Retired.
Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar II - Brady-Handy.jpg

Lucius Q. C. Lamar
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1877
43rd
44th
Elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
HenryLMuldrow.jpg

Henry L. Muldrow
Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1885
45th
46th
47th
48th
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Retired to become First Assistant Secretary of the Interior.
John Mills Allen.jpeg

John Allen
Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1901
49th
50th
51st
52nd
53rd
54th
55th
56th
Elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Retired.
EzekielSCandler.jpg

Ezekiel S. Candler Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1921
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
65th
66th
Elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Lost renomination.
JohnERankin.jpg

John Rankin
Democratic March 4, 1921 –
January 3, 1953
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
Elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Lost renomination.
Thomas G. Abernethy cph.3c32239u.jpg

Thomas Abernethy
Democratic January 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1973
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Retired.
Jamie Whitten.png

Jamie Whitten
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1995
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired.
Roger Wicker, official Congressional photo portrait.jpg

Roger Wicker
Republican January 3, 1995 –
December 31, 2007
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Resigned to become U.S. senator.
Vacant December 31, 2007 –
May 13, 2008
110th
Travischilders.jpg

Travis Childers
Democratic May 13, 2008 –
January 3, 2011
110th
111th
Elected to finish Wicker's term.
Re-elected in 2008.
Lost re-election.
Alan Nunnelee, 112th Congress Official Portrait.jpg

Alan Nunnelee
Republican January 3, 2011 –
February 6, 2015
112th
113th
114th
Elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Died.
Vacant February 6, 2015 –
June 2, 2015
114th
Trent Kelly, Official Portrait, 115th Congress.jpg

Trent Kelly
Republican June 2, 2015 –
present
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected to finish Nunnelee's term.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election results

2012

Mississippi's 1st congressional district, 2012 [5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alan Nunnelee (incumbent) 186,760 60.4
Democratic Brad Morris 114,076 36.9
Libertarian Danny Bedwell 3,584 1.2
Constitution Jim R. Bourland 2,390 0.8
Reform Chris Potts 2,367 0.8
Total votes 309,177 100.0
Republican hold

2014

Mississippi's 1st congressional district, 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alan Nunnelee (incumbent) 102,622 67.9
Democratic Ron Dickey 43,713 28.9
Libertarian Danny Bedwell 3,830 2.6
Reform Lajena Walley 946 0.6
Total votes 151,111 100.0
Republican hold

2015 special election

Mississippi's 1st congressional district special general election, 2015 [7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Walter Zinn 15,385 17.41
Nonpartisan Trent Kelly 14,418 16.32
Nonpartisan Mike Tagert 11,231 12.71
Nonpartisan Greg Pirkle 7,142 8.08
Nonpartisan Starner Jones 6,993 7.91
Nonpartisan Chip Mills 6,929 7.84
Nonpartisan Henry Ross 4,313 4.88
Nonpartisan Boyce Adams 4,037 4.57
Nonpartisan Nancy Adams Collins 4,006 4.53
Nonpartisan Sam Adcock 4,000 4.53
Nonpartisan Ed "Doc" Holliday 3,958 4.48
Nonpartisan Quentin Whitwell 3,124 3.56
Nonpartisan Daniel Sparks 2,828 3.20
Total votes 88,364 100.0
Mississippi's 1st congressional district special runoff election, 2015[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Trent Kelly 69,516 69.97
Nonpartisan Walter Zinn 29,831 30.03
Total votes 99,347 100
Republican hold

2016

Mississippi's 1st congressional district, 2016[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Kelly (incumbent) 206,455 68.7
Democratic Jacob Owens 83,947 27.9
Libertarian Chase Wilson 6,181 2.1
Reform Cathy Toole 3,840 1.3
Total votes 300,123 100.0
Republican hold

2018

Mississippi's 1st congressional district, 2018[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Kelly (incumbent) 158,245 66.9
Democratic Randy Wadkins 76,601 32.4
Reform Tracella Lou O'Hara Hil 1,675 0.7
Total votes 236,521 100.0
Republican hold

2020

Mississippi's 1st congressional district, 2020[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Kelly (incumbent) 228,787 68.7
Democratic Antonia Eliason 104,008 31.3
Total votes 332,795 100.0
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013
2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=28&cd=01
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=28&cd=01
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  4. ^ "MS - District 01". Our Campaigns. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  5. ^ "Secretary of State :: Elections". State of Mississippi Secretary of State. Archived from the original on January 1, 2013. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  6. ^ "Mississippi General Election 2014". Mississippi Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2014.
  7. ^ "Total Votes Reported by County for the 2015 Special Election" (PDF). Mississippi Secretary of State. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  8. ^ "Total Votes Reported by County for the 2015 Special Runoff Election". Mississippi Secretary of State. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  9. ^ "Mississippi General Election 2016". Mississippi Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  10. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  11. ^ "State of Mississippi OFFICIAL 2020 GENERAL ELECTION CERTIFIED RESULTS" (PDF). State of Mississippi Secretary of State. Retrieved December 28, 2020.

Further reading

This page was last edited on 5 June 2021, at 19:15
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