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List of Native Americans in the United States Congress

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of Native Americans with documented tribal ancestry or affiliation in the U.S. Congress.

Map of all congressional districts represented by Native Americans at the beginning of the 117th Congress.
Map of all congressional districts represented by Native Americans at the beginning of the 117th Congress.

All entries on this list are related to Native American tribes based in the contiguous United States. No Alaska Natives have ever served in Congress. There are Native Hawaiians who have served in Congress, but they are not listed here because they are distinct from North American Natives.

Only two Native Americans served in the 115th Congress: Tom Cole (serving since 2003) and Markwayne Mullin (serving since 2013), both of whom are Republican Representatives from Oklahoma. On November 6, 2018, Democrats Sharice Davids of Kansas and Deb Haaland of New Mexico were elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, and the 116th Congress, which commenced on January 3, 2019, had four Native Americans. Davids and Haaland are the first two Native American women with documented tribal ancestry to serve in Congress. At the start of the 117th Congress on January 3, 2021, five Native Americans were serving in the House, the largest Native delegation in history: Cole, Mullin, Haaland and Davids were all reelected in 2020, with Republican Yvette Herrell of New Mexico elected for the first time in 2020. The number dropped back down to four on March 16, 2021 when Haaland resigned her House seat to become Secretary of the Interior. The partisan split is three Republicans, one Democrat.

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Transcription

Senate

Picture Senator
(lifespan)
Tribal ancestry State Party Term start Term end Notes
Hiram Rhodes Revels
Hiram Revels
(1827–1901)
Lumbee Mississippi Mississippi Republican February 23, 1870 March 4, 1871 Retired
Charles Curtis
Charles Curtis
(1860–1936)[1]
Kaw,
Osage,
Potawatomi
Kansas Kansas Republican January 29, 1907 January 3, 1913 Was not reelected after Democrats won control of Kansas Legislature in 1912
March 4, 1915 March 4, 1929 Resigned after being elected Vice President
Robert Latham Owen
Robert Owen
(1856–1947)
Cherokee Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic December 11, 1907 March 4, 1925 Retired
Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Ben Nighthorse Campbell
(born 1933)
Northern Cheyenne Colorado Colorado Democratic (1993–1995) January 3, 1993 January 3, 2005 Retired
Republican (1995-2005)

House of Representatives

  Denotes incumbent

Picture Representative
(lifespan)
Tribal ancestry State Party Term start Term end Notes
Richard H. Cain
Richard H. Cain
(1825–1887)
Cherokee South Carolina South Carolina Republican March 4, 1873 March 4, 1875 Retired
March 4, 1877 March 4, 1879
John Mercer Langston
John Mercer Langston
(1829–1897)
Pamunkey Virginia Virginia Republican September 23, 1890 March 3, 1891 Lost Reelection
Charles Curtis
Charles Curtis
(1860–1936)
Kaw,
Osage,
Potawatomi
Kansas Kansas Republican March 4, 1893 January 28, 1907 Resigned to become U.S. Senator from Kansas
Charles D. Carter
Charles Carter
(1868–1929)
Chickasaw Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic November 16, 1907 March 4, 1927 Lost renomination
William Wirt Hastings
William Hastings
(1866–1938)
Cherokee Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic March 4, 1915 March 4, 1921 Lost reelection
March 4, 1923 January 3, 1935 Retired
Will Rogers, Jr.
Will Rogers Jr.
(1911–1993)
Cherokee California California Democratic January 3, 1943 May 23, 1944 Resigned to join the U.S. Army
William G. Stigler
William Stigler
(1891–1952)
Choctaw Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic March 28, 1944 August 21, 1952 Died in office
Ben Reife
Ben Reifel
(1906–1990)
Lakota Sioux
(Rosebud Sioux)
South Dakota South Dakota Republican January 3, 1961 January 3, 1971 Retired
Clem McSpadden
Clem McSpadden
(1925–2008)
Cherokee Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic January 3, 1973 January 3, 1975 Retired to run unsuccessfully for the nomination to the 1974 Oklahoma gubernatorial election
Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Ben Nighthorse Campbell
(born 1933)
Northern Cheyenne Colorado Colorado Democratic January 3, 1987 January 3, 1993 Retired to run successfully for the 1992 United States Senate election in Colorado
Brad Carson
Brad Carson
(born 1967)
Cherokee Oklahoma Oklahoma Democratic January 3, 2001 January 3, 2005 Retired to run unsuccessfully for the 2004 United States Senate election in Oklahoma
Tom Cole
Tom Cole
(born 1949)
Chickasaw Oklahoma Oklahoma Republican January 3, 2003 Incumbent
Markwayne Mullin
Markwayne Mullin
(born 1977)
Cherokee Oklahoma Oklahoma Republican January 3, 2013 Incumbent
Sharice Davids
Sharice Davids
(born 1980)
Ho-Chunk Kansas Kansas Democratic January 3, 2019 Incumbent First LGBTQ Native American elected
Deb Haaland
Deb Haaland
(born 1960)
Laguna Pueblo New Mexico New Mexico Democratic January 3, 2019 March 16, 2021 Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of the Interior.
Rep. Herrell
Yvette Herrell
(born 1964)
Cherokee New Mexico New Mexico Republican January 3, 2021 Incumbent

References

  1. ^ First Native American popularly elected to the Senate
    Served as President pro tempore and Majority Leader
  • Stubben, Jerry D. (2006). Native Americans and Political Participation: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO. p. 171. ISBN 978-1-57607-262-2.
This page was last edited on 22 June 2021, at 19:30
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