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List of members of the United States Congress by brevity of service

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of United States congresspersons by brevity of service. It includes representatives and senators who have served less than six years in the Senate or less than two years in the House, not counting currently serving members. This list excludes members whose term ended with 73rd United States Congress that served the entirety of that term, which due to the Twentieth Amendment to the United States Constitution, only lasted from March 4, 1933, to January 3, 1935, and inaugural holders of Class 1 and Class 2 Senate seats that served the entirety of the first term, due to the initial terms being only 2 and 4 years long respectively, as the Senate classes were staggered so that a third of the seats would be up every two years.

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Transcription

Key

In green
Appointed to Senate or won special election
D
Died
R
Resigned
AE
Appointed or elected to a different office
O
Other reason for loss of office

Senate time

Tenure Name Party affiliation State Reason for leaving Dates of service Lifespan
1 1 day[a] Rebecca Latimer Felton[1] Democratic Georgia Appointed and did not seek election. November 21, 1922 – November 22, 1922[b] 1835–1930
2[c] 3 days Louis C. Wyman[1] (O) Republican New Hampshire Initially won election to the Senate, but was appointed shortly before it convened to give him seniority over the rest of the incoming cohort. His seat was ruled to be vacant and a new election was held. December 31, 1974 – January 3, 1975 1917–2002
3 8 days Homer V. M. Miller (O) Democratic Georgia Won election to the Senate, but was not seated until February 24, 1871, and served the remainder of his term. February 24, 1871 – March 3, 1871 1814–1896
4 10 days Alva M. Lumpkin (D) Democratic South Carolina Appointed following the vacancy created by James F. Byrnes's appointment to the Supreme Court and later died. July 22, 1941 – August 1, 1941 1886–1941
5 23 days John N. Heiskell[2] (O) Democratic Arkansas Appointed by Governor George Washington Donaghey following the vacancy created by Jeff Davis's death. January 6, 1913 – January 29, 1913 1872–1972
6 33 days William Marmaduke Kavanaugh[3] (O) Democratic Arkansas Appointed by the Arkansas General Assembly following the vacancy created by Jeff Davis's death. January 29, 1913 – March 3, 1913 1866–1915
7 44 days Wilton E. Hall Democratic South Carolina Appointed following the vacancy created by Ellison D. Smith's death and chose not to seek election. November 20, 1944 – January 3, 1945 1901–1980
8 55 days Thomas M. Storke Democratic California Appointed as interim senator following the vacancy created by William Gibbs McAdoo's resignation and the inauguration of Sheridan Downey. November 9, 1938 – January 3, 1939 1876–1971
9 59 days Dean Barkley[1] Independence Party of Minnesota Minnesota Appointed following the death of Paul Wellstone. November 4, 2002 – January 3, 2003 1950–
59 days John Moses (D) Democratic North Dakota Won in the general election, died in office. January 3, 1945 – March 3, 1945 1885–1945
10 73 days George Jones Democratic-Republican Georgia Appointed to fill out the remainder of Abraham Baldwin's term. August 27, 1807 – November 7, 1807 1766–1838
11 93 days Jocelyn Burdick[1] Democratic North Dakota Appointed following the death of her husband Quentin Burdick. September 12, 1992 – December 14, 1992 1922–2019
12 97 days George Walton[1] (R) Federalist Georgia Appointed following the vacancy created by James Jackson's resignation. November 16, 1795 – February 20, 1796 1749–1804
13 104 days Elaine Edwards[1] (R) Democratic Louisiana Appointed following the death of Allen J. Ellender and later resigned. August 1, 1972 – November 13, 1972 1929–2018
14 110 days Middleton P. Barrow Democratic Georgia Appointed to fill out the remainder of Benjamin Harvey Hill's term and did not seek election to a term in his own right. November 15, 1882 – March 3, 1883 1839–1903
15 117 days Oliver H. Prince Democratic Georgia Selected by the state legislature to fill the vacancy caused by Thomas W. Cobb's resignation. November 7, 1828 – March 4, 1829 1782–1837
16 121 days Carte Goodwin Democratic West Virginia Appointed by Governor Joe Manchin on July 16, 2010, as a placeholder to fill the vacancy created by the death of Robert Byrd. July 16, 2010 – November 15, 2010 1974–
17 129 days Charles B. Mitchel (O) Democratic Arkansas Elected in the general election and later expelled from the Senate. March 4, 1861 – July 11, 1861 1815–1864
18 133 days Paul G. Kirk Democratic Massachusetts Appointed following the death of Ted Kennedy and chose not to run in the special election. September 24, 2009 – February 4, 2010 1938–
19 143 days Jeffrey Chiesa[4] Republican New Jersey Appointed following the death of Frank Lautenberg and chose not to run in the special election. June 10, 2013 – October 31, 2013 1965–
20 144 days Bob Krueger[1] Democratic Texas Appointed following the appointment of Lloyd Bentsen as Secretary of the Treasury and was defeated in the special election. January 21, 1993 – June 14, 1993 1935–2022
21 144 days Dixie Bibb Graves[5] (R) Democratic Alabama Appointed following the appointment of Hugo Black as a Supreme Court Justice and later resigned. August 20, 1937 – January 10, 1938 1882–1965
22 144 days George R. Swift[5] Democratic Alabama Appointed following the death of John H. Bankhead II. June 15, 1946 – November 5, 1946 1887–1972
23 149 days Sheila Frahm[1] Republican Kansas Appointed following the resignation of Bob Dole and was defeated in the Republican primary. June 11, 1996 – November 7, 1996 1945–
24 152 days Maryon Pittman Allen[5] Democratic Alabama Appointed following the death of her husband James Allen and later lost the Democratic primary for the special election. June 8, 1978 – November 7, 1978 1925–2018
25 165 days Mo Cowan[4] Democratic Massachusetts Appointed following the appointment of John Kerry as Secretary of State and chose not to run in the special election. February 1, 2013 – July 16, 2013 1969–
26 193 days Ernest W. Gibson, Jr.[1] Republican Vermont Appointed by Governor George D. Aiken following the death of his father, Ernest Willard Gibson. Chose not to run for election to the seat. June 24, 1940 - January 3, 1941 1901-1969
27 213 days William Bellinger Bulloch Democratic-Republican Georgia Appointed following the resignation of William H. Crawford. April 8, 1813 – November 6, 1813 1777–1852
28 215 days Thomas A. Wofford Democratic South Carolina Appointed following the resignation of Strom Thurmond and chose not to run in the special election. April 5, 1956 – November 6, 1956 1908–1978
29 240 days Joseph M. Terrell Democratic Georgia Appointed following the death of Alexander S. Clay and resigned following a stroke. November 17, 1910 – July 14, 1911 1861–1912
30 242 days B. B. Comer[5] Democratic Alabama Appointed following the death of John H. Bankhead. March 5, 1920 – November 2, 1920 1848–1927
31 247 days William Stanley West Democratic Georgia Appointed following the death of Augustus O. Bacon. March 2, 1914 – November 3, 1914 1849–1914
32 259 days Nicholas F. Brady[1] Republican New Jersey Appointed following the resignation of Harrison A. Williams and chose not to run in the special election. April 12, 1982 – December 27, 1982 1930–
33 262 days John S. Cohen Democratic Georgia Appointed following the death of William J. Harris and chose not to run in the special election. April 25, 1932 – January 11, 1933 1870–1935
34 274 days Israel Pickens Democratic Alabama Appointed following the death of Henry H. Chambers. February 17, 1826 – November 27, 1826 1780–1827
35 275 days John C. Breckinridge (O) Democratic Kentucky Elected in the general election and later expelled from the Senate. March 4, 1861 – December 4, 1861 1821–1875
36 277 days Robert M. Charlton Democratic Georgia Appointed following the resignation of John M. Berrien. May 31, 1852 – March 4, 1853 1807–1854
37 297 days Francis S. White Democratic Alabama Elected in the special election following the death of Joseph F. Johnston. Did not run for reelection. May 11, 1914 – March 3, 1915 1847–1922
38 299 days Waldo P. Johnson (O) Democratic Missouri Elected in the general election and later expelled from the Senate. March 17, 1861 – January 10, 1862 1817–1885
39 303 days George S. Houston (D) Democratic Alabama Elected in the general election and died in office. March 4, 1879 – December 31, 1879 1811–1879
40 307 days Luther Strange Republican Alabama Appointed to fill the seat vacated by Jeff Sessions after his resignation to become U.S. Attorney General, but subsequently lost the Republican primary for the special election. February 9, 2017 – January 3, 2018 1953–
41 322 days Luke Pryor Democratic Alabama Appointed following the death of George S. Houston. January 7, 1880 – November 23, 1880 1820–1900
42 327 days Henry H. Chambers (D) Jacksonian Alabama Died in office. March 4, 1825 – January 24, 1826 1790–1826
43 337 days Patrick Walsh Democratic Georgia Appointed to fill out the remainder of the term of Alfred H. Colquitt. April 2, 1894 – March 3, 1895 1840–1899
44 340 days William Blount (O) Democratic-Republican Tennessee Appointed as Tennessee's first senator and was later expelled from the Senate. August 2, 1796 – July 8, 1797 1749–1800
45 373 days Hiram Rhodes Revels Republican Mississippi Elected in a special election following Mississippi's readmission into the United States and later chose not to seek reelection. February 23, 1870 – March 3, 1871 1827–1901
46 380 days Kelly Loeffler Republican Georgia Appointed to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Johnny Isakson, lost subsequent special runoff election. January 6, 2020 – January 20, 2021 1970–
47 389 days Kaneaster Hodges Jr. Democratic Arkansas Appointed to fill the vacancy created by the death of John L. McClellan, prohibited by state law from seeking election to fill the vacancy. December 10, 1977 – January 3, 1979 1938–2022
48 474 days Louis Wigfall (O) Democratic Texas Appointed to fill the vacancy created by James Pinckney Henderson's death and later expelled from the Senate. December 5, 1859 – March 23, 1861 1816–1874
49 642 days Lloyd Spencer[6] (O) Democratic Arkansas Appointed to fill the vacancy created by John E. Miller's resignation to become a judge and did not run for election. April 1, 1941 – January 3, 1943 1893–1981
50 668 days Ted Kaufman Democratic Delaware Appointed to fill the vacancy created by Joe Biden's resignation and chose not to run in the special election. January 16, 2009 – November 15, 2010 1939–
51 690 days Jean Carnahan Democratic Missouri Appointed to fill vacancy created by her husband Mel Carnahan's death who died before being elected but was defeated in a special election to fill the remainder of the term. January 3, 2001 - November 23, 2002 1933–2024
52 698 days Harlan Mathews Democratic Tennessee Appointed to fill the vacancy created by Al Gore's resignation and chose not to run in the special election. January 2, 1993 – December 1, 1994 1927–2014
53 699 days Martha McSally Republican Arizona Appointed to fill the vacancy created by Jon Kyl, lost subsequent special election. January 3, 2019 – December 2, 2020 1966–
54 762 days Richard Nixon (AE) Republican California Appointed following the resignation of Sheridan Downey to the seat he recently won the election for to gain seniority and later elected to the vice presidency. December 1, 1950 – January 1, 1953 1913–1994
55 787 days Donald Stewart Democratic Alabama Elected in a special election following the death of James Allen. Lost renomination and resigned. November 8, 1978 – January 2, 1981 1940–
56 813 days William Kelly Democratic-Republican Alabama Elected following the resignation of John Williams Walker. December 12, 1822 – March 3, 1825 1786–1834
57 1,064 days Scott Brown Republican Massachusetts Won special election against Martha Coakley to finish Ted Kennedy's term in 2010, and sworn on February 4, 2010. Subsequently lost regular election for next term against Democrat Elizabeth Warren. February 4, 2010 – January 3, 2013 1959–
58 1,095 days John Williams Walker (R) Democratic-Republican Alabama Resigned due to failing health. December 14, 1819 – December 12, 1822 1783–1823
59 1,096 days Doug Jones Democratic Alabama Won special election against Roy Moore to finish Jeff Sessions's term in 2017, and sworn in January 2018. Subsequently lost regular election for next term against Republican Tommy Tuberville. January 3, 2018 – January 3, 2021 1954–
60 1,100 days William Wyatt Bibb Democratic-Republican Georgia Elected following the resignation of William H. Crawford. November 6, 1813 – November 9, 1816 1781–1820
61 1,108 days Josiah Tattnall Democratic-Republican Georgia Elected following the resignation of James Jackson. February 20, 1796 – March 4, 1799 1765–1803
62 1,190 days Jeremiah Clemens Democratic Alabama Elected following the death of Dixon Hall Lewis. November 30, 1849 – March 4, 1853 1814–1865
63 1,232 days John E. Miller[7] (R) Democratic Arkansas Elected in special election to fill the vacancy created by Joseph T. Robinson's death and resigned to become a judge. November 15, 1937 – March 31, 1941 1888–1981
64 1,245 days John Milledge Democratic-Republican Georgia Elected following the death of James Jackson. June 19, 1806 – November 14, 1809 1757–1818
65 1,413 days Barack Obama (AE) Democratic Illinois Elected in the general election and later resigned after winning the 2008 presidential election. January 3, 2005 – November 16, 2008 1961–
66 1,476 days Kamala Harris (AE) Democratic California Elected in the general election and later resigned after winning the 2020 election as vice president. January 3, 2017 – January 18, 2021 1964–
67 1,779 days John Forsyth (AE) Democratic-Republican/​Jacksonian Georgia Elected following the resignation of George Troup, then resigned to become U.S. Minister to Spain. Elected again following the resignation of John M. Berrien, re-elected, and then resigned to become U.S. Secretary of State. November 23, 1818 – February 17, 1819;
November 9, 1829 – June 27, 1834
1780–1841
68 1,964 days William H. Crawford (AE) Democratic-Republican Georgia Elected in a special election following the death of Abraham Baldwin. Re-elected, then resigned to become U.S. Minister to France. November 7, 1807 – March 23, 1813 1772–1834

House time

Tenure Name Party affiliation State Reason for leaving Dates of service Lifespan
1 1 day Effingham Lawrence (O) Democratic Louisiana The results of the 1872 election in the district were contested, and the House did not declare Lawrence the winner of the election and seat him until March 3, 1875, the day before the term was to expire. March 3, 1875 – March 4, 1875 1820–1878
1 1 day George A. Sheridan (O) Liberal Republican Louisiana The results of the 1872 election in the district were contested, and the House did not declare Sheridan the winner of the election and seat him until March 3, 1875, the day before the term was to expire. March 3, 1875 – March 4, 1875 1840–1896
3 2 days Turner M. Marquett (O) Republican Nebraska Elected to the at-large seat of the new State of Nebraska, but, because the state was not formally admitted to the Union until March 2, 1867, he was only able to serve as a representative for two days. March 2, 1867 – March 4, 1867 1831–1894
3 2 days[8] Gustavus Sessinghaus (O) Republican Missouri The results of the 1880 election in the district were contested, and the House did not declare Sessinghaus the winner of the election and seat him until March 2, 1883, two days before the term was to expire. March 2, 1883 – March 4, 1883[d] 1838–1887
5 29 days Walter W. Bankhead (R) Democratic Alabama Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 1941 – February 1, 1941 1897–1988
6 31 days Kwanza Hall Democratic Georgia Won special runoff election one month after general election day to fill John Lewis's seat after his death and was not a candidate in the regular election. December 3, 2020 – January 3, 2021 1971–
7 35 days Brenda Jones Democratic Michigan Won special election and was defeated in Democratic primary for a full term. November 29, 2018 – January 3, 2019 1959–
8 39 days James Mann[9] (D) Democratic Louisiana Won in the general election and died in office. July 18, 1868 – August 26, 1868 1822–1868
9 51 days David Curson[10] Democratic Michigan Won special election and did not seek reelection. November 13, 2012 – January 3, 2013 1948–
10 51 days Shelley Sekula-Gibbs Republican Texas Won special election but lost regular general election (as a write-in candidate) held the same day. November 13, 2006 – January 3, 2007 1953–
11 54 days Douglas Hemphill Elliott Republican Pennsylvania Won special election to fill Richard M. Simpson's seat following his death and died in office. April 26, 1960 – June 19, 1960 1921–1960
12 58 days Willa L. Fulmer Democratic South Carolina Won special election to fill her late husband Hampton P. Fulmer's vacant seat and did not seek reelection. November 7, 1944 – January 3, 1945 1884–1968
13 62 days Lewis E. Sawyer Democratic Arkansas Won in the general election and died in office. March 4, 1923 – May 5, 1923 1867–1923
14 84 days Nathaniel D. Wallace[9] Democratic Louisiana Won special election and did not seek reelection. December 9, 1886 – March 3, 1887 1845–1894
15 89 days John W. Hunter Democratic New York Won special election to fill James Humphrey's seat following his death and did not seek reelection. December 4, 1866 – March 3, 1867 1807–1900
16 90 days Alexander Boarman[9] Liberal Republican Louisiana Won special election and lost reelection. December 3, 1872 – March 3, 1873 1839–1916
17 90 days Benjamin Flanders[9] Unionist Louisiana Won special election and did not seek reelection. December 3, 1862 – March 3, 1863 1816–1896
18 95 days William Francis Strudwick Federalist North Carolina Won a special election to replace Absalom Tatom and did not seek reelection. November 28, 1796 – March 3, 1797 1765–1812
19 107 days Robert L. Coffey (D) Democratic Pennsylvania Won in the general election and died in office. January 3, 1949 – April 20, 1949 1918–1949
20 112 days Joe Sempolinski Republican New York Won in a special election to replace Tom Reed and did not seek reelection. September 13, 2022 – January 3, 2023 1983–
21 118 days J. Smith Young Democratic Louisiana Won special election to fill John E. Leonard's seat following his death and did not seek reelection. November 5, 1878 – March 3, 1879 1834–1916
22 121 days Richard Alvin Tonry[9] (R) Democratic Louisiana Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 1977 – May 4, 1977 1935–2012
23 152 days John William Reid (O) Democratic Missouri Won in the general election and later expelled from the House. March 4, 1861 – August 3, 1861 1821–1881
24 188 days Jean Spencer Ashbrook Republican Ohio Won in a special election to replace her husband John M. Ashbrook and did not seek reelection. June 29, 1982 – January 3, 1983 1934–
25 196 days Mayra Flores Republican Texas Won in a special election to replace Filemon Vela Jr. and lost reelection. June 21, 2022 – January 3, 2023 1986–
26 203 days Connie Conway Republican California Won in a special election to replace Devin Nunes and did not seek reelection. June 14, 2022 – January 3, 2023 1950–
27 207 days James C. Alvord (D) Whig Massachusetts Won in the general election and later died. March 4, 1839 – September 27, 1839 1808–1839
28 207 days Alton Waldon Democratic New York Won in a special election to replace Joseph P. Addabbo and later lost renomination. June 10, 1986 – January 3, 1987 1936–2023
29 214 days William B. Spencer (R) Democratic Louisiana Won a special election, and resigned to accept a judicial appointment. June 8, 1876 – January 8, 1877 1835–1882
30 222 days Larkin I. Smith (D) Republican Mississippi Won in the general election and later died. January 3, 1989 – August 13, 1989 1944–1989
31 226 days Charles Djou Republican Hawaii Won in a special election to replace Neil Abercrombie and later lost reelection. May 22, 2010 – January 3, 2011 1970–
32 228 days W. Jasper Blackburn Republican Louisiana Elected following Louisiana's readmission to the Union. July 18, 1868 – March 3, 1869 1820–1899
33 228 days Michel Vidal Republican Louisiana Elected following Louisiana's readmission to the Union. July 18, 1868 – March 3, 1869 1824–1895
34 241 days James Davenport (D) Federalist Connecticut Won in a special election to replace James Hillhouse and later died. December 5, 1796 – August 3, 1797 1758–1797
35 245 days Don Cazayoux Democratic Louisiana Won in a special election to replace Richard Baker and later lost reelection. May 3, 2008 – January 3, 2009 1964–
36 246 days James McCleery (D) Republican Louisiana Died in office. March 4, 1871 – November 5, 1871 1837–1871
37 298 days Walter Capps (D) Democratic California Won in the general election and later died in office. January 3, 1997 – October 28, 1997 1934–1997
38 304 days Katie Hill (R) Democratic California Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 2019 – November 3, 2019 1987–
39 332 days George Santos (O) Republican New York Won in the general election and later expelled from House. January 3, 2023 – December 1, 2023 1988 –
40 358 days Henry Latimer (AE) Federalist Delaware Lost in the general election, but contested the results and was ruled as the victor causing a delayed inauguration and later elected to Senate. February 14, 1794 – February 7, 1795 1752–1819
41 376 days John E. Leonard (D) Republican Louisiana Died in office. March 4, 1877 – March 15, 1878 1845–1878
42 382 days Bill Janklow (R) Republican South Dakota Won in the general election and later resigned due to causing a fatal car crash.[11] January 3, 2003 – January 20, 2004 1939–2012
43 383 days Anthony Wayne (O) Democratic Georgia Won in the general election, but seat was later ruled as vacant due to dispute over his residency. March 4, 1791 – March 21, 1792 1745–1796
44 389 days Trey Radel[12] (R) Republican Florida Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 2013 – January 27, 2014 1976–
45 413 days Vance McAllister (R)[12] Republican Louisiana Won a special election to replace Rodney Alexander and later did not seek reelection. November 16, 2013 – January 3, 2015 1974–
46 417 days Pierre Bossier (D) Democratic Louisiana Died in office. March 4, 1843 – April 24, 1844 1797–1844
47 425 days George Allen Republican Virginia Won a special election to replace D. French Slaughter Jr. and later chose not to seek reelection. November 5, 1991 – January 3, 1993 1952–
48 455 days Absalom Tatom (R) Democratic-Republican North Carolina Won in the general election and later resigned. March 4, 1795 – June 1, 1796 1742–1802
49 464 days George Luke Smith Republican Louisiana Won a special election following the death of Representative-elect Samuel Peters. Lost re-election. November 24, 1873 – March 3, 1875 1837–1884
50 466 days Michael Hahn (D) Unionist, Republican Louisiana Elected late from Union-occupied Louisiana during the Civil War. Louisiana lost representation after the 37th Congress. Later elected again, but died in office. December 3, 1862 – March 4, 1863;
March 4, 1885 – March 15, 1886
1830–1886
51 475 days Samuel Louis Gilmore (D) Democratic Louisiana Died in office. March 30, 1909 – July 18, 1910 1859–1910
52 478 days Bob Turner Republican New York Won a special election to replace Anthony Weiner and did not seek reelection. September 13, 2011 – January 3, 2013 1941–
53 492 days Eric Massa (R) Democratic New York Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 2009 – March 8, 2010 1969–
54 512 days Joseph P. Newsham Republican Louisiana Elected upon Louisiana's readmission to the Union and did not seek reelection. Later elected in a special election to replace Michel Vidal, and did not seek reelection. July 18, 1868 – March 3, 1869
May 23, 1870 – March 3, 1871
1837–1919
55 522 days Frank Ballance (R) Democratic North Carolina Won in the general election and later resigned. January 3, 2003 – June 8, 2004 1942–2019
56 528 days George Partridge (R) Pro-Administration Massachusetts Won in the general election and later resigned. March 4, 1789 – August 14, 1790 1740–1828
57 531 days Joseph F. Smith Democratic Pennsylvania Won in a special election to replace Raymond Lederer and later lost in the Democratic primary. July 21, 1981 – January 3, 1983 1920–1999
58 531 days Charles Magill Conrad (AE) Whig Louisiana Resigned following appointment as U.S. Secretary of War. March 4, 1849 – August 17, 1850 1804–1878
59 556 days Karen Handel Republican Georgia Won a special election to replace Tom Price and later lost reelection. June 26, 2017 – January 3, 2019 1962–
60 564 days Mark Takai (D) Democratic Hawaii Won in the general election and later died in office. January 3, 2015 – July 20, 2016 1967–2016
61 582 days Kathy Hochul Democratic New York Won a special election to replace Chris Lee and later lost reelection. June 1, 2011 – January 3, 2013 1962–
62 582 days Benjamin Franklin Whittemore (R) Republican South Carolina Won a special election following South Carolina's readmission into the Union and later resigned. July 18, 1868 – February 24, 1870 1824–1894
63 594 days Lovell Rousseau (R) Unconditional Unionist Kentucky Elected in the general election, but resigned after being censured only to run in the special election and won to replace himself and later did not seek reelection. March 4, 1865 – July 21, 1866; December 3, 1866 – March 3, 1867 1818–1869
64 600 days Bill Redmond Republican New Mexico Won a special election to replace Bill Richardson and later lost reelection. May 13, 1997 – January 3, 1999 1955–
65 602 days John T. Deweese (R) Republican North Carolina Won a special election following North Carolina's readmission into the Union and later resigned. July 6, 1868 – February 28, 1870 1835-1906
66 609 days Peter W. Barca Democratic Wisconsin Won a special election to replace Les Aspin and later lost reelection. May 4, 1993 – January 3, 1995 1955–
67 614 days Scott Murphy Democratic New York Won a special election to replace Kirsten Gillibrand and later lost reelection. April 29, 2009 – January 3, 2011 1970–
68 614 days Uriah Forrest (R) Federalist Maryland Won in the general election and later resigned. March 4, 1793 – November 8, 1794 1756-1805
69 644 days Catherine Small Long Democratic Louisiana Won a special election to replace her husband Gillis William Long and later chose not to run for reelection. March 30, 1985 – January 3, 1987 1924–2019
70 661 days John H. Overton Democratic Louisiana Won a special election to replace James B. Aswell. Did not seek reelection to the House. May 12, 1931 – March 3, 1933 1875–1948
71 674 days Sam Brownback (AE) Republican Kansas Won in the general election and later the special Senate election to replace Bob Dole. January 3, 1995 – November 7, 1996 1956–
72 730 days Tim Scott (AE; R) Republican South Carolina Won in the general election, and later won reelection, but he resigned a day before his initial House term ended to accept appointment to the Senate. January 3, 2011 – January 2, 2013 1965–

See also

Notes

  1. ^ If one were to only count following her inauguration then she would only have served one day, but if tenure were counted she would have served 50 days
  2. ^ Tenure: October 3, 1922 – November 22, 1922
  3. ^ 1 if one were to count Felton's tenure rather than days served.
  4. ^ While the issue of whether the congressional term prior to the adoption of the 20th Amendment ended at 11:59 p.m. on March 3 or at 11:59 a.m. on March 4 was one that never was resolved conclusively in either the House of Representatives or Senate, the final House session of the 47th Congress ended on March 4, 1883. See [1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Who's On The Senate 'Short List'?". NPR. Archived from the original on 15 October 2017.
  2. ^ "John Netherland Heiskell (1872–1972)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Archived from the original on October 3, 2023.
  3. ^ "William Marmaduke Kavanaugh (1866–1915)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Archived from the original on October 3, 2023.
  4. ^ a b "Mo Cowan, Jeff Chiesa join a long line of short-term senators". The Washington Post.
  5. ^ a b c d "The Shortest-Serving U.S. Senators in Alabama History". 12 December 2017.
  6. ^ "George Lloyd Spencer (1893–1981)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Archived from the original on October 3, 2023.
  7. ^ "John Elvis Miller (1888–1981)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Archived from the original on October 3, 2023.
  8. ^ "Sessinghaus, Gustavus". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Archived from the original on February 20, 2024.
  9. ^ a b c d e "The Shortest Tenures of Louisiana US Reps in History". 9 April 2014.
  10. ^ "Jeff Chiesa Appointment: The Long History Of The Shortest Congressional Tenures". 8 June 2013.
  11. ^ Goldstein, Richard (January 12, 2012). "Bill Janklow, a Four-Term Governor of South Dakota, Dies at 72". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  12. ^ a b "Vance McAllister is nowhere near the shortest-serving lawmaker in congressional history". The Washington Post.
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