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List of Quaker members of the United States Congress

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

As of 2023, twenty-four Quakers have ever been elected to the United States Congress, the first being John Chew Thomas in 1799. One Quaker currently serves in the Congress.

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Transcription

Senate

Senator Party State Term Notes
Start End Length of
service (days)
William Windom Republican Minnesota July 15, 1870 January 22, 1871 191
(191 days)
Successor qualified[1]
March 4, 1871 March 7, 1881 3,656
(10 years, 3 days)
Resigned to become United States Secretary of the Treasury[1]
March 7, 1889 January 29, 1891 693
(1 year, 328 days)
Lost re-election[1]
Arthur Capper Republican Kansas March 4, 1919 January 3, 1949 10,898
(29 years, 305 days)
Retired[1]
Joseph R. Grundy Republican Pennsylvania December 11, 1929 December 1, 1930 355
(355 days)
Lost re-election[1]
Paul Douglas Democratic Illinois January 3, 1949 January 3, 1967 6,574
(18 years, 0 days)
Lost re-election[2]
Richard Nixon Republican California December 1, 1950 January 1, 1953 762
(2 years, 31 days)
Resigned, having run successfully
for vice president of the United States[3]
John Hickenlooper Democratic Colorado January 3, 2021 Incumbent 1,155
(3 years, 60 days)
[4]

House of Representatives

Senator Party District Term Notes
Start End Length of
service (days)
John Chew Thomas Federalist MD-02 March 4, 1799 March 1, 1801 727
(1 year, 362 days)
Retired[1]
John Conard Democratic-
Republican
PA-01 March 8, 1813 March 8, 1815 730
(2 years, 0 days)
Retired[1]
William Darlington Democratic-
Republican
PA-02 March 4, 1815 March 3, 1817 730
(1 year, 364 days)
[1]
March 4, 1819 March 3, 1823 1,460
(3 years, 364 days)
[1]
Edward Bates National Republican Party MO-AL March 4, 1827 March 3, 1829 730
(1 year, 364 days)
[1]
John Wethered Whig MD-03 April 8, 1843 March 8, 1845 700
(1 year, 334 days)
[1]
Joseph Grinnell Whig MA-10 December 7, 1843 March 8, 1851 2,648
(7 years, 91 days)
Retired[1]
Samuel G. Wright Whig NJ-02 March 4, 1845 July 30, 1845 148
(148 days)
Died in office[1]
David P. Holloway Opposition IN-05 January 4, 1855 January 3, 1857 730
(1 year, 365 days)
[1]
William Windom Republican MN-01 January 4, 1863 January 4, 1869 2,192
(6 years, 0 days)
Retired[1]
Isaac Ambrose Barber Republican MD-01 January 4, 1897 January 3, 1899 729
(1 year, 364 days)
[1]
Thomas S. Butler Republican PA-06 March 8, 1897 March 8, 1903 11,401
(31 years, 79 days)
Died in office[5]
PA-07 March 8, 1903 March 8, 1923
PA-08 March 8, 1923 May 26, 1928
William W. Cocks Republican NY-01 March 4, 1905 March 3, 1911 2,190
(5 years, 364 days)
[1]
A. Mitchell Palmer Democratic PA-26 March 4, 1909 March 3, 1915 2,190
(5 years, 364 days)
Retired to unsuccessfully run for the Senate[1]
Frederick C. Hicks Republican NY-01 January 4, 1916 March 3, 1923 2,615
(6 years, 364 days)
[1]
Andrew Biemiller Democratic WI-05 January 3, 1945 January 3, 1947 730
(2 years, 0 days)
Lost re-election[1]
January 3, 1949 January 3, 1951 730
(2 years, 0 days)
Lost re-election[1]
Richard Nixon Republican CA-12 January 3, 1947 November 30, 1950 1,427
(3 years, 331 days)
Resigned on appointment to the Senate[3]
Edward Tylor Miller Republican MD-01 January 3, 1947 January 3, 1959 4,383
(12 years, 0 days)
Lost re-election[1]
William G. Bray Republican IN-07 January 3, 1951 January 3, 1967 5,844
(16 years, 0 days)
Lost re-election[1]
IN-06 January 3, 1967 January 3, 1975
Edwin B. Forsythe Republican NJ-06 November 3, 1970 January 3, 1983 4,895
(13 years, 147 days)
Died in office[1]
NJ-13 January 3, 1983 March 29, 1984
Rush Holt Jr. Democratic NJ-12 January 3, 1999 January 3, 2015 5,844
(16 years, 0 days)
Retired[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Political Graveyard
  2. ^ Bowdoin.edu[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ a b Ingle, H. Larry (2015). Nixon's First Cover-up: The Religious Life of a Quaker President. Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. ISBN 978-0-8262-2042-4.
  4. ^ Colorado state portal: Retrieved 10 October 2011. Archived October 13, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Retrieved 4 October 2011.
  6. ^ Thomas D. Hamm, The Quakers in America, Columbia University Press, 2003, p. 160.
This page was last edited on 18 February 2024, at 06:48
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