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Grand Traverse County, Michigan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Grand Traverse County
Grand Traverse County Courthouse in Traverse City
Grand Traverse County Courthouse in Traverse City
Flag of Grand Traverse County
Official logo of Grand Traverse County
Map of Michigan highlighting Grand Traverse County
Location within the U.S. state of Michigan
Map of the United States highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°44′N 85°33′W / 44.73°N 85.55°W / 44.73; -85.55
Country United States
State Michigan
Founded1851[1]
Named forGrand Traverse Bay
SeatTraverse City
Largest cityTraverse City
Area
 • Total601 sq mi (1,560 km2)
 • Land464 sq mi (1,200 km2)
 • Water137 sq mi (350 km2)  23%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
95,238
 • Density198/sq mi (76/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.co.grand-traverse.mi.us

Grand Traverse County is located in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2020 census, the population was 95,238.[2] The county seat is Traverse City.[3]

Grand Traverse County is part of the Traverse City, MI, Micropolitan Statistical Area, which also includes Benzie, Kalkaska, and Leelanau counties.

Interlochen, home of the Interlochen Center for the Arts, is located in Green Lake Township.

Grand Traverse County was originally known as Omeena County.

History

Early history

In 1840, the county was separated from Mackinac County and originally named Omeena County, later to be renamed Grand Traverse County, after Grand Traverse.

Grand Traverse County was organized by an act of the state legislature on April 7, 1851.[1] Grand Traverse is derived from a French phrase meaning "long crossing" and the county is so named because it is situated at the Grand Traverse Bay.[1][4] The first permanent settlement in the county was the mission now known as Old Mission. The county was initially divided into two townships: Peninsula Township, which was coterminous with the Old Mission Peninsula, and Traverse Township, which took up the rest of the county.

Over time, Traverse Township was divided into Garfield and Whitewater townships. Later on, Garfield Township was further divided into Silver Lake and Mayfield townships, and Whitewater Township was divided into Acme, East Bay, and Paradise townships. Over time, lines were redrawn, and the townships evolved into today's configuration.

Historical markers

There are 12 recognized Michigan historical markers in the county:[5] They are:

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 601 square miles (1,560 km2), of which 464 square miles (1,200 km2) is land and 137 square miles (350 km2) (23%) is water.[7] Grand Traverse County is considered to be part of Northern Michigan. The highest point in Grand Traverse County is Exodus Hill in Long Lake Township, and the lowest point is the Grand Traverse Bay. Power Island, the largest island in Grand Traverse Bay, is part of Peninsula Township.

Adjacent counties

Lakes

(not including Lake Michigan)

  • Arbutus Lake
  • Bartlett Lake
  • Bass Lake
  • Bellew Lake
  • Bellows Lake
  • Boardman Lake
  • Brewster Lake
  • Bridge Lake
  • Bullhead Lake
  • Bumphrey Lake
  • Cedar Hedge Lake
  • Cedar Lake
  • Chandler Lake
  • Christmas Tree Lake
  • Coffield Lake
  • Coon Lake
  • Denzer Lake
  • Dollar Lake
  • Lake DuBonnet
  • Duck Lake (Wahbekaness)
  • Dyer Lake
  • Elk Lake
  • Ellis Lake
  • Fenton Lake
  • Fern Lake
  • Fife Lake
  • Fish Lake
  • Green Lake (Wahbekanetta)
  • Hay Lake
  • Heniser Lakes
  • High Lake
  • Hunter Lake
  • Huellmantel Lake
  • Larch Lake
  • Long Lake
  • Lost Lake
  • Mayfield Pond
  • Mirror Lake
  • Mud Lake
  • Muncie Lake
  • Noren Lake
  • Page Lake
  • Petobego Pond
  • Pickerel Lake
  • Prescott Lake
  • Pyatt Lake
  • Rahe Lake
  • Rennie Lake
  • Saunders Lake
  • Lake Scandinavia
  • Silver Lake
  • Skiver Lake
  • Smith Lake
  • Spider Lake
  • Lake Skegemog
  • Strombolis Lake
  • Stricker Lake
  • Lake Swainston
  • Tonawanda Lake
  • Truax Lake
  • Twin Lake
  • Vandervoight Lake
  • Whelock Lake
  • Wistrand Lake

Creeks

  • 22 Creek
  • Acme Creek
  • Angell Creek
  • Bancroft Creek
  • Beitner Creek
  • California Creek
  • Campbell Creek
  • Carpenter Creek
  • Cedar Run
  • Dipley Creek
  • Desmond Creek
  • Dyer Creek
  • East Creek
  • Fife Lake Outlet
  • Harris Creek
  • Headquarters Creek
  • Jaxon Creek
  • Kids Creek
  • Kesner Creek
  • Kingsley Creek
  • Mitchell Creek
  • Neal Creek
  • No Name Creek
  • Orchard Creek
  • Parker Creek
  • Prescott Creek
  • Pyatt Creek
  • Rennie Creek
  • Rudhardt Creek
  • Sands Creek
  • Sucker Creek
  • Swainston Creek
  • Spider Creek
  • Taylor Creek
  • Tobeco Creek
  • Treasure Creek
  • Vanderlip Creek
  • Williamsburg Creek
  • Woodland Creek
  • Yuba Creek

Rivers

Transportation

Air travel

Grand Traverse County is served by Cherry Capital Airport, which is located near Traverse City. It serves the 21-county Northern Michigan area, and has destinations around the country. Other airparks in the county include:

Other than Cherry Capital Airport, all other airports in the county are unpaved

Formerly, there was an airport on the south side of Traverse City called Ransom Field.[8] This was located on Rennie Hill. This airport closed sometime in the 1930s.

Map of Grand Traverse County's highways
Map of Grand Traverse County's highways

Major highways

The county contains about 103 miles (166 km), about 1.07% of the Michigan State Trunkline Highway System. These highways include the ones listed below.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18601,286
18704,443245.5%
18808,42289.6%
189013,35558.6%
190020,47953.3%
191023,78416.1%
192019,518−17.9%
193020,0112.5%
194023,39016.9%
195028,59822.3%
196033,49017.1%
197039,17517.0%
198054,89940.1%
199064,27317.1%
200077,65420.8%
201086,98612.0%
202095,2389.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2018[2]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 77,654 people, 30,396 households, and 20,730 families residing in the county. The population density was 167 inhabitants per square mile (64/km2). There were 34,842 housing units at an average density of 75 per square mile (29/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 96.51% White, 0.40% Black or African American, 0.93% Native American, 0.49% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 1.09% from two or more races. 1.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 25.1% were of German, 11.3% English, 10.7% Irish, 8.4% American and 7.4% Polish ancestry, 96.4% spoke English and 1.6% Spanish as their first language.

There were 30,396 households, out of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.70% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.80% were non-families. 25.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 25.40% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 29.70% from 25 to 44, 24.00% from 45 to 64, and 13.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,169, and the median income for a family was $51,211. Males had a median income of $34,796 versus $24,139 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,111. About 3.80% of families and 5.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.30% of those under age 18 and 5.90% of those age 65 or over.

Religion

Grand Traverse County is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Gaylord.[14]

Government and politics

United States presidential election results for Grand Traverse County, Michigan[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 30,502 50.54% 28,683 47.53% 1,168 1.94%
2016 27,413 52.73% 20,965 40.33% 3,607 6.94%
2012 26,534 55.05% 20,875 43.31% 788 1.63%
2008 24,716 50.60% 23,258 47.62% 869 1.78%
2004 27,446 59.42% 18,256 39.52% 489 1.06%
2000 22,358 58.48% 14,371 37.59% 1,500 3.92%
1996 16,355 49.07% 12,987 38.97% 3,987 11.96%
1992 13,629 39.55% 11,148 32.35% 9,684 28.10%
1988 17,191 62.46% 10,098 36.69% 236 0.86%
1984 18,036 70.83% 7,271 28.55% 157 0.62%
1980 14,484 58.63% 7,150 28.94% 3,072 12.43%
1976 13,505 63.85% 7,263 34.34% 382 1.81%
1972 11,421 64.81% 5,810 32.97% 390 2.21%
1968 8,960 61.51% 4,741 32.55% 866 5.94%
1964 6,198 45.26% 7,475 54.59% 20 0.15%
1960 8,618 63.65% 4,886 36.09% 36 0.27%
1956 9,102 73.47% 3,256 26.28% 30 0.24%
1952 9,034 77.14% 2,639 22.53% 38 0.32%
1948 5,473 68.28% 2,365 29.51% 177 2.21%
1944 5,413 67.03% 2,607 32.28% 55 0.68%
1940 5,620 64.27% 3,095 35.39% 30 0.34%
1936 3,676 46.07% 3,827 47.96% 477 5.98%
1932 3,442 45.70% 3,907 51.88% 182 2.42%
1928 4,429 74.56% 1,489 25.07% 22 0.37%
1924 4,011 74.86% 558 10.41% 789 14.73%
1920 4,056 74.04% 1,158 21.14% 264 4.82%
1916 1,917 45.81% 1,848 44.16% 420 10.04%
1912 899 23.25% 937 24.23% 2,031 52.52%
1908 2,811 65.88% 1,289 30.21% 167 3.91%
1904 3,383 81.40% 594 14.29% 179 4.31%
1900 3,127 68.38% 1,286 28.12% 160 3.50%
1896 2,533 57.20% 1,745 39.41% 150 3.39%
1892 1,734 54.70% 924 29.15% 512 16.15%
1888 1,859 63.10% 925 31.40% 162 5.50%
1884 1,645 64.59% 808 31.72% 94 3.69%


The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the

major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Historically, Grand Traverse County has been a Republican-leaning county; it has voted for the Republican candidate in every presidential election since the Civil War,[16] except for four: 1912, 1932, 1936, and 1964. In the last decade, the county has become more politically competitive; though Democratic candidates have not carried the county since 1964, their margins of defeat have narrowed in recent elections. Traverse City leans Democratic while the rest of the county leans Republican.

In the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump carried the county, despite losing the state of Michigan. In 2020, he won the county with 50.54% (30,502 votes), and in 2016, won with 52.73% (27,413 votes).[17]

In 2008, Republican candidate John McCain received 24,716 votes in the county (50.60% of the total) to Democratic candidate Barack Obama's 23,258 (47.62%), even as Obama carried the state of Michigan by a double-digit margin.[18] McCain's margin of victory was narrower than usual for a Republican candidate in the county.

In 2004, Republican president George W. Bush received 27,446 votes in the county (59.42%) to Democrat John Kerry's 18,256 (39.52%).[19]

In 2000, Bush received 22,358 votes in the county (58.48%) to Democrat Al Gore's 14,371 (37.59%).[20]

Elected officials

County commission

  • District 1: Betsy Coffia
  • District 2: Bryce Hundley
  • District 3: Brad Jewett
  • District 4: Penny Morris
  • District 5: Ron Clous (vice chair)
  • District 6: Darryl Nelson
  • District 7: Rob Hentschel (chair)

Law enforcement agencies

County

  • Grand Traverse County Sheriff's Department

City

  • Traverse City Police Department

Fire departments

  • Blair Township Fire Department
  • Fife Lake Springfield Fire Department
  • Grand Traverse Metro Fire Department
  • Green Lake Township Emergency Services
  • Long Lake Fire-Rescue
  • Paradise Emergency Services
  • Peninsula Township Fire Department
  • City Of Traverse City Fire Department
  • Whitewater Township Fire Department

Education

Grand Traverse County has many schools. TCAPS is by far the largest school district in the area, with its headquarters in Traverse City. All of its schools are located within the county, although some of the district itself extends into nearby Benzie and Leelanau counties. Other districts in the county are Forest Area, GTA, Benzie Central, and Elk Rapids school districts. There are independent Catholic schools in the county as well.

Economy

According to the Grand Traverse Economic Development Corporation, the largest employers in Grand Traverse County, as of 2017, are:[21]

# Employer Full-time
employees
1 Munson Healthcare 3,100
2 Traverse City Area Public Schools 1,800
3 Northwestern Michigan College 750
4 Grand Traverse Resort and Spa 550
5 Hagerty Insurance Agency 500
6 Grand Traverse County 500
7 Interlochen Center for the Arts 475
8 Grand Traverse Pavilions 415
9 Britten Banners 380
10 Tyson Foods 300

Communities

U.S. Census data map showing local municipal boundaries within Grand Traverse County.  Shaded areas represent incorporated cities.
U.S. Census data map showing local municipal boundaries within Grand Traverse County. Shaded areas represent incorporated cities.

City

Villages

Charter townships

Civil townships

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Indian reservation

Ghost towns

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Bibliography on Grand Traverse County". Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved August 27, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Government Printing Office. p. 141.
  5. ^ "Michigan Historical Markers". michmarkers.com. Archived from the original on April 12, 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2008.
  6. ^ "Old restaurant may take on new owners". Traverse City Record-Eagle. record-eagle.com. Archived from the original on July 12, 2012.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  8. ^ "Timeline". Traverse Area Historical Society. August 4, 2016. Retrieved December 5, 2017.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  14. ^ "The Diocese of Gaylord, Michigan: A Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church - Diocese of Gaylord". dioceseofgaylord.org.
  15. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections".
  16. ^ Menendez, Albert J. (2005). The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868–2004. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. pp. 222–227. ISBN 0786422173.
  17. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 19, 2020.
  18. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections - State Data". uselectionatlas.org.
  19. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections - State Data". uselectionatlas.org.
  20. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections - State Data". uselectionatlas.org.
  21. ^ Grand Traverse Economic Development Corporation: Director's Report.

External links

This page was last edited on 27 June 2022, at 03:45
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