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Calhoun County, Michigan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Calhoun County
Post Card. Michigan Central Depot in Battle Creek.
Official logo of Calhoun County

Logo
Map of Michigan highlighting Calhoun County
Location within the U.S. state of Michigan
Map of the United States highlighting Michigan

Michigan's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°15′N 85°00′W / 42.25°N 85°W / 42.25; -85
Country United States
State Michigan
Foundedestablished 1829
organized 1833[1]
Named forJohn C. Calhoun
SeatMarshall
Largest cityBattle Creek
Area
 • Total718 sq mi (1,860 km2)
 • Land706 sq mi (1,830 km2)
 • Water12 sq mi (30 km2)  1.7%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
134,487
 • Density193/sq mi (75/km2)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.calhouncountymi.gov

Calhoun County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 136,146.[2] The county seat is Marshall.[3] The county was established on October 19, 1829 and named after John C. Calhoun, who was at the time Vice President under Andrew Jackson, making it one of Michigan's Cabinet counties. County government was first organized on March 6, 1833.[1][4]

Calhoun County comprises the Battle Creek, MI Metropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Kalamazoo-Battle Creek-Portage, MI Combined Statistical Area.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 718 square miles (1,860 km2), of which 706 square miles (1,830 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (1.7%) is water.[5]

Geographic features

Adjacent counties

History

The Kalamazoo River oil spill occurred in July 2010 when a pipeline operated by Enbridge (Line 6B) burst and flowed into Talmadge Creek, a tributary of the Kalamazoo River. A six-foot break in the pipeline resulted in the largest inland oil spill, and one of the costliest spills in U.S. history. The pipeline carries diluted bitumen (dilbit), a heavy crude oil from Canada's Athabasca oil sands to the United States. Following the spill, the volatile hydrocarbon diluents evaporated, leaving the heavier bitumen to sink in the water column. Thirty-five miles of the Kalamazoo River were closed for clean-up until June 2012, when portions of the river were re-opened. On March 14, 2013, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ordered Enbridge to return to dredge portions of the river to remove submerged oil and oil-contaminated sediment.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
184010,599
185019,16280.8%
186029,56454.3%
187036,56923.7%
188038,4525.1%
189043,50113.1%
190049,31513.4%
191056,63814.8%
192072,91828.7%
193087,04319.4%
194094,2068.2%
1950120,81328.2%
1960138,85814.9%
1970141,9632.2%
1980141,557−0.3%
1990135,982−3.9%
2000137,9851.5%
2010136,146−1.3%
Est. 2018134,487[6]−1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2018[2]

The 2010 United States Census[11] indicates Calhoun County had a 2010 population of 136,146. This is a decrease of -1,839 people from the 2000 United States Census. Overall, the county had a -1.3% growth rate during this ten-year period. In 2010 there were 54,016 households and 35,220 families in the county. The population density was 192.8 per square mile (74.4 square kilometers). There were 61,042 housing units at an average density of 86.4 per square mile (33.4 square kilometers). The racial and ethnic makeup of the county was 79.8% White, 10.7% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 4.5% Hispanic or Latino, 0.1% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races.

There were 54,016 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.3% were husband and wife families, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.8% were non-families, and 28.8% were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.2% under age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.

The 2010 American Community Survey 1-year estimate[11] indicates the median income for a household in the county was $42,921 and the median income for a family was $49,964. Males had a median income of $25,712 versus $18,298 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,661. About 11.7% of families and 16.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.9% of those under the age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Presidential election results
Presidential Elections Results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 53.5% 31,494 41.0% 24,157 5.5% 3,251
2012 48.6% 28,333 50.2% 29,267 1.3% 727
2008 44.5% 28,553 53.8% 34,561 1.7% 1,082
2004 51.2% 32,093 47.7% 29,891 1.1% 683
2000 47.7% 26,291 49.6% 27,312 2.7% 1,477
1996 40.0% 20,953 50.1% 26,287 9.9% 5,203
1992 33.7% 19,791 43.5% 25,542 22.8% 13,369
1988 53.8% 26,771 45.6% 22,717 0.6% 299
1984 62.6% 34,470 36.9% 20,313 0.5% 284
1980 52.2% 30,912 38.9% 23,022 8.9% 5,242
1976 53.8% 30,390 44.6% 25,229 1.6% 901
1972 58.3% 32,531 39.7% 22,154 2.1% 1,143
1968 47.6% 26,181 41.2% 22,633 11.2% 6,146
1964 36.5% 18,987 63.3% 32,939 0.2% 99
1960 57.5% 32,080 42.1% 23,511 0.4% 202
1956 61.3% 32,284 38.3% 20,184 0.3% 175
1952 62.1% 31,941 37.3% 19,171 0.7% 335
1948 55.0% 19,285 43.0% 15,077 2.1% 734
1944 54.8% 20,664 44.1% 16,611 1.1% 418
1940 53.3% 21,633 46.0% 18,682 0.7% 295
1936 40.6% 14,667 56.0% 20,231 3.5% 1,255
1932 48.4% 16,255 48.5% 16,281 3.1% 1,027
1928 80.4% 24,379 19.0% 5,769 0.6% 173
1924 71.9% 18,165 15.9% 4,020 12.2% 3,077
1920 69.1% 16,722 26.0% 6,291 4.9% 1,180
1916 42.1% 6,484 52.2% 8,037 5.8% 891
1912 26.4% 3,447 29.0% 3,781 44.6% 5,817
1908 56.0% 6,848 34.7% 4,240 9.4% 1,143
1904 64.5% 7,506 26.7% 3,102 8.9% 1,031
1900 50.1% 6,220 44.8% 5,560 5.1% 633
1896 47.0% 5,874 49.6% 6,202 3.4% 418
1892 48.1% 5,077 39.3% 4,150 12.6% 1,329
1888 52.8% 5,732 40.1% 4,358 7.1% 772
1884 51.2% 5,113 43.2% 4,309 5.7% 564

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Elected officials

(information as of October 2015)

Communities

Cities

Villages

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

Townships

Historical markers

There are 83 recognized Michigan historical markers in the county.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Bibliography on Calhoun County". Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 27, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Peirce, Henry B. (2005) [1877]. "Chapter VII". History of Calhoun county, Michigan. Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Library. p. 18. Retrieved 2007-02-11.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". Retrieved April 18, 2019.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  11. ^ a b "American Factfinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  13. ^ "Michigan Historical Markers". michmarkers.com. Archived from the original on 2010-03-15. Retrieved 2008-01-11.

External links

This page was last edited on 15 September 2019, at 09:49
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