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Saginaw County, Michigan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Saginaw County
Saginaw County Governmental Center in Saginaw
Saginaw County Governmental Center in Saginaw
Official seal of Saginaw County
Map of Michigan highlighting Saginaw County
Location within the U.S. state of Michigan
Map of the United States highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 43°20′N 84°03′W / 43.33°N 84.05°W / 43.33; -84.05
Country United States
State Michigan
FoundedFebruary 9, 1835[1][2]
SeatSaginaw
Largest citySaginaw
Area
 • Total816 sq mi (2,110 km2)
 • Land800 sq mi (2,000 km2)
 • Water16 sq mi (40 km2)  1.9%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total190,124
 • Density250/sq mi (100/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts4th, 5th
Websitewww.saginawcounty.com

Saginaw County, officially the County of Saginaw, is a county located in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 190,124.[3] The county seat is Saginaw.[1][4] The county was created by September 10, 1822, and was fully organized on February 9, 1835.[1] The etymology of the county's name is uncertain. It may be derived from Sace-nong or Sak-e-nong (English: Sauk land), as the Sauk (French: Sac) tribe is believed by some to have once lived there. A more likely possibility is that it comes from Ojibwe words meaning "place of the outlet" –sag (English: an opening) and ong (English: place of).[5] See List of Michigan county name etymologies.

Saginaw County comprises the Saginaw, MI Metropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Saginaw-Midland-Bay City Combined Statistical Area, the 5th largest metropolitan area in Michigan.

Etymology

The name Saginaw is widely believed to mean "where the Sauk were" in Ojibwe, from Sace-nong or Sak-e-nong (Sauk Town), due to the belief that the Sauk once lived there. But it is more likely that the name means "place of the outlet", from the Ojibwe sag (opening) and ong (place of).[6][7]

When Natives told Samuel de Champlain that the Sauk nation was on the western shore of Lake Michigan, Champlain mistakenly placed them on the western shore of Lake Huron. This mistake was copied on subsequent maps, and future references identified this as the place of the Sauks. Champlain himself never visited what is now Michigan.[8]

History

The area was inhabited from about 1000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. by the Native American Hopewell culture, followed by the Anishnabeg. Some historians believe that the Sauk at one time lived in the area and were driven out by Ojibwe (Chippewa), before the area was first visited by Europeans.

The Saginaw region includes an extensive network of many rivers and streams which converge into the Saginaw River and provided a means for easy travel for the Native American population among numerous settlements and hunting areas, as well as access to Lake Huron. Saginaw was also a frequent meeting location for councils of the Ojibwe, Pottawatomi, and Ottawa—the Three Fires of the Anishnabeg.[9]

What is today Saginaw County was inhabited by the Ojibwe at the time of the arrival of Euro-Americans. The Ojibwe were still the dominant force in the area in the 1820s, and in 1827 they were attacked by a two groups of Winnebago people coming from Wisconsin. The Ojibwe prevailed in this fight with the aid of local Euro-American settlers.[10]

In 1853 the Ojibwe and Ottawa both established large hunting camps along the Saginaw River, although Euro-American settlers were beginning to establish saw mills and farms in the area by that point.[11]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 816 square miles (2,110 km2), of which 800 square miles (2,100 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) (1.9%) is water.[12] It is part of the Flint/Tri-Cities region of Mid-Michigan. The median elevation in Saginaw County, Michigan is 620 feet (190 m) above sea level.[13]

Primary rivers

Wildlife refuge

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840892
18502,609192.5%
186012,693386.5%
187039,097208.0%
188059,09551.1%
189082,27339.2%
190081,222−1.3%
191089,2909.9%
1920100,28612.3%
1930120,71720.4%
1940130,4688.1%
1950153,51517.7%
1960190,75224.3%
1970219,74315.2%
1980228,0593.8%
1990211,946−7.1%
2000210,039−0.9%
2010200,169−4.7%
2020190,124−5.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
1790-1960[15] 1900-1990[16]
1990-2000[17] 2010-2019[3]

The 2010 United States Census[18] indicates Saginaw County had a 2010 population of 200,169. This is a decrease of -9,870 people from the 2000 United States Census. Overall, the county had a -4.7% growth rate during this ten-year period. In 2010 there were 79,011 households and 52,287 families in the county. The population density was 250.2 per square mile (96.6 square kilometers). There were 86,844 housing units at an average density of 108.5 per square mile (41.9 square kilometers). The racial and ethnic makeup of the county was 70.5% White, 18.6% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 1.0% Asian, 7.8% Hispanic or Latino, 0.1% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races.

There were 79,011 households, out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.4% were husband and wife families, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.8% were non-families, and 28.2% were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.4% under age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.

The 2010 American Community Survey 1-year estimate[18] indicates the median income for a household in the county was $41,938 and the median income for a family was $52,243. Males had a median income of $27,691 versus $16,488 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,025. About 12.4% of families and 16.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.1% of those under the age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.

Religion

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saginaw is the controlling regional body for the Catholic Church.[19]

Government and politics

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Starting in 1988, Saginaw County became a reliable Democratic stronghold at the Presidential level. However, in recent elections it has become increasingly competitive, with Donald Trump narrowly winning the county in 2016 while narrowly losing it in 2020 by about 300 votes.

United States presidential election results for Saginaw County, Michigan[20][21]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 50,785 49.08% 51,088 49.37% 1,610 1.56%
2016 45,469 47.97% 44,396 46.84% 4,915 5.19%
2012 42,720 43.46% 54,381 55.33% 1,191 1.21%
2008 42,225 40.49% 60,276 57.80% 1,782 1.71%
2004 47,165 45.86% 54,887 53.37% 800 0.78%
2000 41,152 43.89% 50,825 54.21% 1,779 1.90%
1996 31,577 35.97% 47,579 54.19% 8,638 9.84%
1992 32,103 33.13% 43,819 45.22% 20,983 21.65%
1988 42,401 47.88% 45,616 51.51% 549 0.62%
1984 51,495 56.95% 38,420 42.49% 501 0.55%
1980 45,233 48.22% 41,650 44.40% 6,916 7.37%
1976 46,765 55.63% 36,280 43.15% 1,026 1.22%
1972 47,920 61.03% 29,424 37.47% 1,177 1.50%
1968 38,070 49.17% 32,266 41.67% 7,087 9.15%
1964 28,146 38.25% 45,309 61.58% 127 0.17%
1960 41,351 55.68% 32,715 44.05% 206 0.28%
1956 43,470 62.67% 25,681 37.03% 210 0.30%
1952 38,604 64.23% 20,983 34.91% 513 0.85%
1948 22,923 56.28% 16,995 41.72% 815 2.00%
1944 27,289 56.38% 20,383 42.11% 730 1.51%
1940 27,042 54.35% 22,490 45.20% 221 0.44%
1936 15,527 37.50% 22,592 54.56% 3,291 7.95%
1932 17,794 42.97% 22,643 54.67% 977 2.36%
1928 22,467 65.61% 11,555 33.75% 220 0.64%
1924 23,618 67.99% 6,206 17.87% 4,914 14.15%
1920 20,425 68.24% 8,494 28.38% 1,013 3.38%
1916 9,544 51.70% 8,434 45.69% 483 2.62%
1912 5,032 27.94% 5,845 32.46% 7,130 39.60%
1908 9,447 54.41% 7,019 40.42% 898 5.17%
1904 10,146 60.66% 5,330 31.86% 1,251 7.48%
1900 8,413 50.17% 7,610 45.38% 746 4.45%
1896 8,361 47.92% 8,792 50.39% 294 1.69%
1892 6,737 44.37% 7,601 50.07% 844 5.56%
1888 6,723 41.95% 8,923 55.68% 379 2.37%
1884 5,939 44.68% 7,047 53.02% 305 2.29%


Elected officials

All countywide officers are elected for four-year terms. The next scheduled election for these offices is November of 2024.

(information as of April 2021)

Parks and Recreation Commission

Saginaw County Parks and Recreation Commission is a county-wide government organization founded by William H. Haithco Sr. in 1969. Haithco then served as chairman from 1972 to 1999.[22] The organization operates six parks throughout the county - Imerman Memorial Park, Veterans Memorial Park, Ringwood Forest, Price Nature Center, William H. Haithco Recreation Area, and The Saginaw Valley Rail Trail. These parks comprise over 550 acres, including 18 miles of hiking trails, two boat launches, four fishing access sites, a swimming beach, picnic shelters, and recreation programs.[23][24]

Economy

The largest employers in Saginaw County are:[25]

# Employer # of employees
1 Nexteer Automotive 5200
2 Covenant HealthCare 4512
3 St. Mary's of Michigan 1800
4 Morley Companies 1750
5 Meijer 1425
6 Saginaw Valley State University 1071
7 Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation 1000
8 Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn 940
9 Aleda E. Lutz Veteran Affairs Medical Center 904
10 County of Saginaw 676
11 Saginaw Public Schools 657
12 Fashion Square Mall 650
13 Saginaw Township Community Schools 621
14 Saginaw Intermediate School District 613
15 Frankenmuth Insurance 694

Transportation

Saginaw County was the destination of a Sauk footpath that became one of the first roads in what is now Michigan, the Saginaw Trail. The trail, first authorized in 1819, was completed to Saginaw in 1841. Since then, Saginaw's access to the outside world has expanded with the development of maritime, rail, air, and freeway links to the major cities of Michigan and neighboring states and nations.

Airports

Scheduled airline service is available from MBS International Airport[26] near Freeland, Michigan and Bishop International Airport in Flint, Michigan.[27] Harry Browne Airport[28] in Buena Vista Charter Township also serves the region.

Highways

Maritime

The Saginaw River is maintained by the Corps of Engineers, and from time to time, dredged to maintain a shipping channel down the river to Bay City, and from there, to the Great Lakes.

Education

Primary and secondary education

Public schools

Most of Saginaw County is served by the Saginaw Intermediate School District (SISD), which coordinates the efforts of local boards of education, but has no operating authority over schools. Local school boards in Michigan retain great autonomy over day-to-day operations. A number of charter schools also operate in the county.

Higher education

  • Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) is a four-year state university located in eastern Kochville Township.
  • Delta College is a two-year community college that serves Saginaw County, but is located in neighboring Bay County, a few miles to the north of the SVSU campus.

Notable natives

  • George C. Hinkley (1892-1936), Wisconsin State Assemblyman and businessman, was born in Saginaw County.[30]
  • Theodore Roethke (1908–1963) Pulitzer prize and National Book Award-winning poet was born and buried here.

Historical markers

There are twenty eight recognized historical markers in the county:[31] They are:

  • Bliss Park
  • Burt Opera House / Wellington R. Burt
  • Coal Mine No. 8
  • The Cushway House / Benjamin Cushway and Adelaide Cushway
  • First Congregational Church [Saginaw]
  • Fowler Schoolhouse (Fremont Township)
  • Frankenmuth / Saint Lorenz Evangelical Lutheran Church
  • Frankenmuth Bavarian Inn
  • Freeland United Methodist Church
  • George Nason House
  • Hess School
  • Hoyt Library
  • Leamington Stewart House
  • Michigan's German Settlers
  • Morseville Bridge
  • Presbyterian Church of South Saginaw
  • Saginaw Club
  • Saginaw Oil Industry
  • Saginaw Post Office
  • Saginaw Valley Coal
  • Saginaw Valley Lumbering Era
  • St. Mary's Hospital
  • Saint Michael Catholic Parish
  • St. Paul's Episcopal Mission
  • Shroeder House
  • Theodore Roethke / Childhood Home

Communities

U.S. Census data map showing local municipal boundaries within Saginaw County.  Shaded areas represent incorporated cities.
U.S. Census data map showing local municipal boundaries within Saginaw County. Shaded areas represent incorporated cities.

Cities

Villages

Charter townships

Civil townships

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Bibliography on Saginaw County". Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University. Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  2. ^ Saginaw County
  3. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. ^ Michigan County names per the Michigan government.
  6. ^ "Clarke Home—entral Michigan University". cmich.edu.
  7. ^ Michigan Counties. DNR. Retrieved 2012-11-05.
  8. ^ Saginaw's Changeable Past, by Jeremy W. Kilar, G. Bradley, St. Louis, MO, 1994, p. 15
  9. ^ Saginaw' Changeable Past, Jeremy W. Kilar, G. Bradley, St.Louis, MO, 1994, p15
  10. ^ History of Sagimaw County, Michigan (Chicago: Charles C. Chapman & Co, 1881) p. 120
  11. ^ History of Saginaw County, p. 123-124
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  13. ^ "Saginaw County, Michigan Geography Analysis". Retrieved December 12, 2014.
  14. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  16. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  18. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  19. ^ "Diocese of Saginaw". saginaw.org.
  20. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS[bare URL]
  21. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 5,664 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 1,291 votes, and Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 175 votes.
  22. ^ Johnson, Bob (March 20, 2011). "A life remembered: William H. Haithco Sr., father of parks and recreation in Saginaw County". MLive. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  23. ^ "Parks and Recreation Commission - About Us". County of Saginaw, Michigan. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  24. ^ "Children's Fun Day is Tuesday at Haithco Park in Saginaw Twp". WEYI. July 16, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  25. ^ Saginaw County Primary Employers.
  26. ^ "MBS International Airport". mbsairport.org.
  27. ^ "Bishop International Airport: Flint, Michigan: Flights & Airport Travel". bishopairport.org.
  28. ^ Jeff Turner. "Saginaw Browne Airport Aircraft Services". khyx.org.
  29. ^ "M-46 Endpoint Photos". state-ends.com. Archived from the original on April 14, 2005.
  30. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1926,' Biographical sketch of George C. Hinkley, pg. 714
  31. ^ "Michigan Historical Markers". michmarkers.com. Archived from the original on March 15, 2010.

Further reading

External links

This page was last edited on 22 May 2022, at 18:21
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