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Vermont's at-large congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vermont's at-large congressional district
VT 1.gif
U.S. Representative
  Peter Welch
DNorwich
Area9,620 sq mi (24,900 km2)
Population (2000)608,827
Median income$57,513[1]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVID+15[2]

Vermont has been represented in the United States House of Representatives by a single at-large congressional district since the 1930 census, when the state lost its second seat, obsoleting its 1st and 2nd congressional districts. There were once six districts in Vermont, all of which were eliminated after various censuses.

Bernie Sanders (Independent) held the seat from 1991 until 2007, when he became a U.S. Senator. Democrat Peter Welch has represented the state since 2007.

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Transcription

Contents

List of representatives

Vermont has elected its representatives at-large from 1813 to 1821, beginning with the 13th Congress; 1823 to 1825, with the 18th Congress; and from 1933 to the present, beginning with the 73rd Congress, after being reduced to one representative as a result of the 1930 Census. In all other years, Vermont elected its representatives from separate districts.

All members were elected statewide at-large on a general ticket.

1813–1823: Six seats

Congress & Years
Seat A Seat B Seat C Seat D Seat E Seat F
Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history
13th March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
William Czar Bradley.jpg

William C. Bradley
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
William Strong Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
James Fisk politician.jpg

James Fisk
Democratic-Republican Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
Charles Rich Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
Richard Skinner.jpg

Richard Skinner
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
Ezra Butler.jpg

Ezra Butler
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1812.

Lost re-election.
14th March 4, 1815 –
May 5, 1816
Daniel Chipman.jpg

Daniel Chipman
Federalist Elected in 1814.

Resigned.
Luther Jewett Federalist Elected in 1814.

Retired.
Chauncey Langdon.jpg

Chauncey Langdon
Federalist Elected in 1814.

Lost re-election.
Asa Lyon (Vermont Congressman).jpg

Asa Lyon
Federalist Elected in 1814.

Lost re-election.
Charles Marsh.jpg

Charles Marsh
Federalist Elected in 1814.

Retired.
John Noyes.jpg

John Noyes
Federalist Elected in 1814.

Retired.
May 5, 1816 –
March 3, 1817
Vacant
15th March 4, 1817 –
April 20, 1818
Orsamus C. Merrill Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Re-elected in 1818.

Lost election contest.[a]
Mark Richards Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Re-elected in 1818.

Lost re-election.
Charles Rich Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Re-elected in 1818.

Redistricted to the 3rd district.
Heman Allen - Sheriff und US Politiker.jpg

Heman Allen
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Resigned to become a U.S. Marshall.
Samuel Crafts.jpg

Samuel C. Crafts
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Re-elected in 1818.

Redistricted to the 5th district.
William Hunter Democratic-Republican Elected in 1816.

Retired.
April 20, 1818 –
March 3, 1819
Vacant
16th March 4, 1819 –
January 12, 1820
William Strong Democratic-Republican Elected in 1818.

Lost re-election.
Ezra Meech.jpg

Ezra Meech
Democratic-Republican Re-elected in 1818.

Lost re-election.
January 13, 1820 –
March 3, 1821
Rollin C Mallary.jpg

Rollin C. Mallary
Democratic-Republican Won election contest.[a]

Redistricted to the 1st district.


In 1821, Vermont used districts instead.

1823–1825: Five seats

Vermont returned to at-large districts briefly in 1823 for just one Congress.

Congress & Years
Seat A Seat B Seat C Seat D Seat E
Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history Rep. Party Electoral history
17th March 4, 1823 –
October 15, 1824
Rollin C Mallary.jpg

Rollin C. Mallary
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.

Redistricted to the 2nd district.
William Czar Bradley.jpg

William C. Bradley
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.

Redistricted to the 1st district.
Charles Rich Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.

Died.
Daniel A. A. Buck Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.

Retired.
Samuel Crafts.jpg

Samuel C. Crafts
Democratic-Republican Elected in 1822.

Retired.
October 15, 1824 –
December 13, 1824
Vacant
December 13, 1824 –
March 3, 1825
Henry Olin Democratic-Republican Elected to finish Rich's term.

Retired.

1933–Present: 1 seat

After the 1930 United States Census, Vermont was reduced to one seat, which it's used ever since.

Representative Party Years Electoral History
Ernest W. Gibson.jpg

Ernest W. Gibson
Republican March 4, 1933 –
October 19, 1933
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1932.
Resigned when appointed U.S. Senator.
Vacant October 19, 1933 –
January 16, 1934
Charles A. Plumley.jpg

Charles A. Plumley
Republican January 16, 1934 –
January 3, 1951
Elected to finish Gibson's term.
Subsequently re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Retired.
WinstonProuty.jpg

Winston L. Prouty
Republican January 3, 1951 –
January 3, 1959
Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
William Meyer (Vermont).JPG

William H. Meyer
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
Elected in 1958.
Lost re-election.
Robert Theodore Stafford.jpg

Robert Stafford
Republican January 3, 1961 –
September 16, 1971
Elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Resigned when appointed U.S. Senator.
Vacant September 16, 1971 –
January 7, 1972
Richard W. Mallary.jpg

Richard W. Mallary
Republican January 7, 1972 –
January 3, 1975
Won special election in 1972.
Re-elected in November 1972.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
JimJeffords.png

Jim Jeffords
Republican January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1989
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Peter Plympton Smith.jpg

Peter P. Smith
Republican January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 1991
Elected in 1988.
Lost re-election.
Bernie Sanders 104th Congress.jpg

Bernie Sanders
Independent January 3, 1991 –
January 3, 2007
Elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Peterwelch.jpg

Peter Welch
Democratic January 3, 2007 –
Present
Elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.

Recent elections

1990 election

Independent Bernie Sanders defeated incumbent Republican Peter Plympton Smith.

United States House election, 1990: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 117,522 56
Republican Peter Plympton Smith 82,938 39.52
Democratic Lewis E. Young 6,315 3.01
Liberty Union Peter Diamondstone 1,965 0.94
Write-ins N/A 1,116 0.53
Majority 34,584 16.48
Turnout 209,856
Independent gain from Republican Swing

1992 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House election, 1992: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 162,724 57.78 +1.78%
Republican Tim Philbin 86,901 30.86 +2.35%
Democratic Lewis E. Young 22,279 7.91 +4.9%
Natural Law John Dewey 3,549 1.26 +1.26%
Liberty Union Peter Diamondstone 3,660 1.30 +0.36%
Freedom for LaRouche Douglas M. Miller 2,049 0.73 +0.73%
Write-ins N/A 464 0.16 −0.37%
Majority 75,823 26.92
Turnout 281,626
Independent hold Swing

1994 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House election, 1994: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 105,502 44.84 −12.94%
Republican John Carroll 98,523 41.87 +11.01%
Natural Law Carole Banus 2,963 1.26 +0.00
Green Jack Rogers 2,664 1.13 +1.13%
Liberty Union Annette Larson 1,493 0.63 −0.67%
Write-ins N/A 304 0.13 −0.03%
Majority 6,979 2.97
Turnout 235,279
Independent hold Swing

1996 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1996: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 140,678 55.23 +10.39%
Republican Susan W. Sweetser 82,021 32.59 −9.28%
Democratic Jack Long 23,830 9.36 +9.36%
Libertarian Thomas J. Morse 2,693 1.06 +1.06%
Liberty Union Peter Diamondstone 1,965 0.77 +0.14%
Green Robert Melamede 1,350 0.53 −0.60%
Natural Law Norio Kushi 812 0.32 −0.94%
Write-ins N/A 357 0.14 +0.01%
Majority 57,657 22.64
Turnout 254,706
Independent hold Swing

1998 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 1998: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 136,403 63.40 +8.17%
Republican Mark Candon 70,740 32.88 +0.29%
Green Matthew Mulligan 3,464 1.61 +1.08%
Liberty Union Peter Diamondstone 2,153 1.01 +.024%
Libertarian Robert Maynard 2,097 0.97 −0.09%
Write-ins N/A 276 0.13 −.01%
Majority 65,663 30.52
Turnout 215,133
Independent hold Swing

2000 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2000: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 196,118 69.21 +5.81%
Republican Karen Ann Kerin 51,977 18.34 −14.54%
Liberty Union Peter Diamondstone 14,918 5.26 +3.65%
Independent Stewart Skrill 4,799 1.69 +1.69%
Green Jack Rogers 2,978 1.05 −0.56%
Libertarian Daniel H. Krymkowski 2,978 1.05 +0.08%
Write-ins N/A 760 0.27 +0.14%
Majority 144,141 50.87 +20.35
Turnout 283,366
Independent hold Swing

2002 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2002: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 144,880 64.32 −4.89%
Republican William Meub 72,813 32.32 +13.98%
Liberty Union Jane Newton 3,185 1.41 −3.85%
Grassroots Fawn Skinner 2,344 1.04 −0.01%
Libertarian Daniel H. Krymkowski 2,033 0.90 −0.15%
Majority 72,067 31.99
Turnout 225,255
Independent hold Swing

2004 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders ran for and won re-election.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2004: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Bernie Sanders 205,774 67.47 +2.8%
Republican Greg Parke 74,271 24.35 −7.7%
Democratic Larry Drown 21,684 7.11 +7.1%
Liberty Union Jane Newton 3,018 0.99 −0.3%
Write-ins N/A 261 0.09 N/A
Majority 131,503 43.11
Turnout 305,008
Independent hold Swing +5.3

2006 election

Incumbent Bernie Sanders retired to run for (and win) a U.S. Senate seat.

Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore Peter Welch (D-Windsor County) was the Democratic nominee and the eventual winner.

Three candidates competed for the Republican nomination:

Rainville won the Republican primary on September 12, beating Shepard by a wide margin.

There were also numerous third party and independent candidates: Chris Karr (WTP), Bruce Marshall (Green Party), Dennis Morrisseau (Ind), Jane Newton (Liberty Union Party), Keith Stern (Ind), and Jerry Trudell (Ind). Morrisseau gathered the most votes, with 1% or 1,383 votes.

By September 14, 2006, the race between Rainville and Welch was close. An American Research Group poll showed Welch with a 48–45% lead.[4]

On October 4, 2006, The Burlington Free Press reported that one of Rainville's staffers, Christopher Stewart, resigned from her campaign after committing plagiarism—copying policy statements from other politicians, including Senator Hillary Clinton, and using them on Rainville's website. Rainville's website was off-line for some time while her staff removed the plagiarized passages.[5]

Welch beat Rainville 53% to 45%, or 139,585 votes to 117,211.

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2006: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Welch 139,815 53.22 +46.1
Republican Martha Rainville 117,023 44.54 +20.1
Independent Dennis Morrisseau 1,390 0.53 +0.53
Independent Jerry Trudell 1,013 0.39 +0.39
Green Bruce Marshall 994 0.38 +0.38
Independent Keith Stern 963 0.37 +0.37
Liberty Union Jane Newton 721 0.27 −0.7
We the People Chris Karr 599 0.23 +0.23
Write-ins N/A 208 0.08 +0.08
Majority 22,792 8.68 −34.4
Turnout 262,726
Democratic gain from Independent Swing

2008 election

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2008: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Welch 248,203 83.25 +30.03%
Independent Mike Bethel 14,349 4.18 +4.18
Energy Independence Jerry Trudel 10,818 3.63 +3.63%
Progressive Thomas James Hermann 9,081 3.05 +3.05%
Independent Cris Ericson 7,841 2.63 +2.63%
Liberty Union Jane Newton 5,307 1.78 +1.51%
Write-ins N/A 2,552 0.86 +0.78%
Majority 233,854 78.43
Turnout 298,151
Democratic hold Swing

2010 election

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2010: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Welch 154,006 64.57 −18.68%
Republican Paul D. Beaudry 76,403 32.03 +32.03%
Independent (United States) Gus Jaccaci 4,704 1.97 +1.97%
Socialist Jane Newton 3,222 1.35 −0.43%
Write-ins N/A 186 0.08 −0.78%
Majority 77,603 32.54
Turnout 238,521
Democratic hold Swing

2012 election

United States House of Representatives election in Vermont, 2012: Vermont's at-large district
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Peter Welch 208,600 72.01 +7.44%
Republican Mark Donka 67,543 23.32 −8.71%
Independent James "Sam" Desrochers 8,302 2.87 +0.90%
Liberty Union Jane Newton 4,065 1.40 +1.40%
VoteKISS[6] Andre Laframboise 1,153 0.40 +0.40%
Majority 141,057 48.69
Turnout 289,663
Democratic hold Swing

Living former members of the House

As of April 2015, there are two living former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Vermont's at-large congressional district. The most recent representative to die was Jim Jeffords (served 1975-1989) on August 18, 2014.

U.S. Representative Service Date of birth (and age)
Peter P. Smith 1989–1991 (1945-10-31) October 31, 1945 (age 73)
Bernie Sanders 1991–2007 (1941-09-08) September 8, 1941 (age 77)

2008 Presidential primary results

Democratic primary

Senator Barack Obama of Illinois won the March 4, 2008 Vermont Democratic Primary with 59.31% of the statewide/at-large congressional district vote while Senator Hillary Clinton of New York received 38.59%.

Republican primary

U.S. Senator John McCain of Arizona won the March 4, 2008 Vermont Republican Primary with 71.32% of the statewide/at-large congressional district vote while former Governor Mike Huckabee of Arkansas finished second with 14.30%.

Sources

  • Office of the Clerk: Election Statistics since 1920
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

Notes

  1. ^ a b Initial returns in the 1818 election showed Rollin C. Mallary in 8th place with 6,879 votes and Orsamus Cook Merrill in 6th place with 6,955 votes, but after challenging the results, the House Committee on Elections declared Mallary the winner of the last seat with 6,961 votes, a 6-vote lead over Merrill.[citation needed]

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=50
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Dritschilo, Gordon (July 21, 2005). "GOP candidate calls for impeachment". Rutland Herald. Archived from the original on October 31, 2005. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  4. ^ "Vermont US Congress". American Research Group, Inc. September 29, 2006. Archived from the original on September 29, 2006. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  5. ^ Hallenbeck, Terri (October 4, 2006). "Rainville staff rewrites statements. Web site closed over plagiarism". Burlington Free Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  6. ^ "VoteKISS Home". VoteKISS party.
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