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Bosque County, Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bosque County
The Bosque County Courthouse in Meridian
The Bosque County Courthouse in Meridian
Map of Texas highlighting Bosque County
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 31°54′N 97°38′W / 31.9°N 97.63°W / 31.9; -97.63
Country United States
State Texas
Founded1854
Named forBosque River
SeatMeridian
Largest cityClifton
Area
 • Total1,003 sq mi (2,600 km2)
 • Land983 sq mi (2,550 km2)
 • Water20 sq mi (50 km2)  1.34%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total18,212
 • Density19/sq mi (7/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district25th
Websitewww.bosquecounty.us

Bosque County (/ˈbɒski/ BOS-kee) is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,212.[1] Its county seat is Meridian,[2] while Clifton is the largest city and the cultural/financial center of the county. The county is named for the Bosque River, which runs through the center of the county north to south. The Brazos River makes up the eastern border along with the Lake Whitney reservoir it feeds.[3]

Since 2015, Bosque County has been represented in the Texas House of Representatives by the Republican DeWayne Burns. The previous 10-year representative was the Republican Rob Orr of Burleson.

History

In 1721, while traveling from San Antonio de Béxar to a mission in East Texas, the Marqués de San Miguel de Aguayo ventured north from the Old San Antonio Road and camped along the Brazos River. Near his camp was also a tributary of the Brazos which he named the Bosque, Spanish for forest. This was the first recorded European expedition through the region.

Until the 1850s, settlement of the region that was to become Bosque County remained sparse. About a decade previous, some members of the ill-fated Texan Santa-Fe Expedition of 1841 which passed through the area, chose to stay. One particularly noteworthy attempt at settlement was the town of Kent. In 1850, the Universal Immigration Company of England purchased land for a townsite on the west side of the Brazos. After several years, thirty families were sent over by the company to settle the land. However, the newly established community would barely survive the first winter, suffering a number of fatalities. The following spring, the settlers planned to right the course of the settlement by purchasing some cattle and seed corn. This plan too would go awry, as the cows would eat the corn before it could be harvested. This was due to there being no fence around the corn. Eventually, the town of Kent dissolved, with most of the settlers choosing to go elsewhere, including some that returned to England.

Bosque County was officially created in 1854, being separated from McLennon County.[4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,003 square miles (2,600 km2), of which 983 square miles (2,550 km2) is land and 20 square miles (52 km2) (2.0%) is water.[5]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18602,005
18704,981148.4%
188011,217125.2%
189014,22426.8%
190017,39022.3%
191019,0139.3%
192018,032−5.2%
193015,750−12.7%
194015,7610.1%
195011,836−24.9%
196010,809−8.7%
197010,9661.5%
198013,40122.2%
199015,12512.9%
200017,20413.7%
201018,2125.9%
2019 (est.)18,685[6]2.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1850–2010[8] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 17,204 people, 6,726 households, and 4,856 families residing in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (7/km2). There were 8,644 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 90.75% White, 1.92% Black or African American, 0.55% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 5.17% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. 12.23% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,726 households, out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.6% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.8% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.95.

A Williams Institute analysis of 2010 census data found there were about 2.5 same-sex couples per 1,000 households in the county.[10]

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.4% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 95.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,181, and the median income for a family was $40,763. Males had a median income of $31,669 versus $21,739 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,455. About 8.9% of families and 12.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 14.6% of those age 65 or over.

Media

Bosque County is currently listed as part of the Dallas-Fort Worth DMA. Local media outlets include: KDFW-TV, KXAS-TV, WFAA-TV, KTVT-TV, KERA-TV, KTXA-TV, KDFI-TV, KDAF-TV, and KFWD-TV. Although located in Central Texas and a neighboring county of the Waco and Killeen – Temple – Fort Hood metropolitan areas. Meaning all of the Waco/Temple/Killeen market stations also provide coverage for Bosque County. They include: KCEN-TV, KWTX-TV, KXXV-TV, KDYW, and KWKT-TV.

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 80.6% 6,339 16.3% 1,278 3.2% 250
2012 80.0% 5,885 18.6% 1,367 1.4% 104
2008 75.4% 5,762 23.5% 1,797 1.1% 87
2004 75.6% 5,737 23.9% 1,815 0.5% 34
2000 70.1% 4,745 28.5% 1,930 1.4% 95
1996 47.1% 2,840 40.3% 2,427 12.6% 759
1992 35.4% 2,300 33.5% 2,173 31.1% 2,016
1988 56.3% 3,458 43.4% 2,670 0.3% 19
1984 65.6% 3,923 34.2% 2,046 0.2% 14
1980 53.5% 2,908 44.7% 2,431 1.8% 98
1976 39.2% 1,912 60.5% 2,954 0.4% 17
1972 74.1% 2,947 25.5% 1,014 0.4% 15
1968 35.1% 1,377 46.3% 1,817 18.5% 727
1964 27.5% 1,024 72.3% 2,690 0.2% 7
1960 46.9% 1,653 52.5% 1,852 0.6% 20
1956 49.7% 1,654 50.1% 1,670 0.2% 7
1952 50.5% 1,982 49.4% 1,940 0.2% 7
1948 17.0% 501 77.9% 2,303 5.1% 152
1944 15.1% 504 75.0% 2,502 9.9% 329
1940 16.2% 595 83.8% 3,083 0.1% 2
1936 13.3% 350 86.5% 2,283 0.2% 5
1932 7.8% 272 92.1% 3,214 0.1% 3
1928 55.2% 1,526 44.7% 1,235 0.1% 4
1924 13.4% 403 84.0% 2,534 2.7% 80
1920 22.3% 567 61.2% 1,556 16.6% 421
1916 9.9% 179 85.9% 1,561 4.2% 77
1912 4.7% 64 88.9% 1,217 6.4% 88

Communities

Cities

Census-designated place

Unincorporated communities

Ghost town

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 5, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Bosque County
  4. ^ "History of Bosque County". Bosque County. 2017. Retrieved October 23, 2020.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  8. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  10. ^ Where Same-Sex Couples Live, June 26, 2015, retrieved July 6, 2015
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-19.

Bibliography

  • Bosque County History Book Committee, Bosque County, Land and People (Dallas: Curtis Media, 1985).
  • Bosquerama, 1854-1954: Centennial Celebration of Bosque County, Texas (Meridian, Texas: Bosque County Centennial Association, 1954).
  • William C. Pool, A History of Bosque County (San Marcos, Texas: San Marcos Record Press, 1954).
  • William C. Pool, Bosque Territory (Kyle, Texas: Chaparral, 1964).

External links

This page was last edited on 14 December 2020, at 20:49
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