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Hood County, Texas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hood County, Texas
Granbury June 2018 35 (Hood County Courthouse).jpg
Seal of Hood County, Texas

Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Hood County

Location in the U.S. state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas

Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1866
Named for John Bell Hood
Seat Granbury
Largest city Granbury
Area
 • Total 437 sq mi (1,132 km2)
 • Land 421 sq mi (1,090 km2)
 • Water 16 sq mi (41 km2), 3.7%
Population
 • (2010) 51,182
 • Density 122/sq mi (47/km2)
Congressional district 11th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.hood.tx.us

Hood County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 51,182.[1] Its county seat is Granbury.[2] The county is named for John Bell Hood, a Confederate lieutenant general and the commander of Hood's Texas Brigade.

Hood County is part of the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Granbury Micropolitan Area.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • Introduction to Hood County History re-edited version
  • Granbury, Texas; Hood County
  • Why Granbury Texas
  • An introduction to the History of Hood County
  • Hood County, TX. 4/26/2014

Transcription

Contents

History

Hood County was formed in 1866 from portions of Johnson County. It was named after John Bell Hood,[3] a general of the Confederate Army and commander of Hood's Texas Brigade.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 437 square miles (1,130 km2), of which 421 square miles (1,090 km2) is land and 16 square miles (41 km2) (3.7%) is water.[4]

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18702,585
18806,125136.9%
18907,61424.3%
19009,14620.1%
191010,0089.4%
19208,759−12.5%
19306,779−22.6%
19406,674−1.5%
19505,287−20.8%
19605,4433.0%
19706,39817.5%
198017,714176.9%
199028,98163.6%
200041,10041.8%
201051,18224.5%
Est. 201656,857[5]11.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1850–2010[7] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 41,100 people, 16,176 households, and 12,099 families residing in the county. The population density was 98 people per square mile (38/km²). There were 19,105 housing units at an average density of 45 per square mile (18/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.77% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.82% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 2.40% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. 7.24% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 16,176 households out of which 28.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.60% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.20% were non-families. 21.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.88. As of the 2010 census, there were about 3.4 same-sex couples per 1,000 households in the county.[9]

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.60% under the age of 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 25.20% from 25 to 44, 26.60% from 45 to 64, and 17.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,668, and the median income for a family was $50,111. Males had a median income of $38,662 versus $23,723 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,261. About 6.00% of families and 8.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.00% of those under age 18 and 7.40% of those age 65 or over.

Media

The restored Granbury Opera House adorned with patriotic decorations during the 2014 Fourth of July festival
The restored Granbury Opera House adorned with patriotic decorations during the 2014 Fourth of July festival

Hood County is part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Television media market in North Central Texas. Local News media outlets are: KDFW-TV, KXAS-TV, WFAA-TV, KTVT-TV, KERA-TV, KTXA-TV, KDFI-TV, KDAF-TV, KFWD-TV, and KDTX-TV. Hood County is serviced by two news media sources, "Hood County Free Press", an online daily news publication, and the bi-weekly newspaper, Hood County News.

Education

The following school districts serve Hood County:

Politics

Hood County has become a strongly Republican county since 1980.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 81.4% 21,382 15.3% 4,008 3.3% 872
2012 81.5% 18,409 17.0% 3,843 1.5% 327
2008 76.5% 17,299 22.5% 5,087 1.1% 238
2004 76.5% 16,280 22.9% 4,865 0.7% 148
2000 71.0% 12,429 26.9% 4,704 2.1% 372
1996 52.1% 7,575 37.5% 5,459 10.4% 1,516
1992 37.5% 5,313 30.8% 4,359 31.7% 4,490
1988 63.2% 7,400 36.3% 4,255 0.5% 61
1984 68.7% 6,817 30.9% 3,063 0.4% 41
1980 54.1% 3,755 43.2% 3,001 2.7% 184
1976 36.7% 1,857 62.9% 3,181 0.5% 23
1972 64.3% 1,743 35.0% 949 0.7% 18
1968 27.4% 593 53.5% 1,155 19.1% 413
1964 20.3% 423 79.6% 1,661 0.1% 3
1960 43.1% 943 56.6% 1,238 0.3% 6
1956 40.6% 751 59.1% 1,095 0.3% 6
1952 36.5% 780 63.5% 1,356
1948 11.2% 169 84.6% 1,273 4.1% 62
1944 9.9% 146 81.7% 1,203 8.4% 123
1940 11.2% 166 88.8% 1,318 0.1% 1
1936 9.3% 102 90.3% 988 0.4% 4
1932 8.6% 106 91.0% 1,119 0.4% 5
1928 57.1% 640 42.7% 479 0.2% 2
1924 9.7% 122 85.5% 1,074 4.8% 60
1920 17.2% 175 68.3% 697 14.5% 148
1916 7.6% 64 82.3% 693 10.1% 85
1912 4.5% 38 80.4% 674 15.0% 126

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved December 17, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 160. 
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  9. ^ Where Same-Sex Couples Live, June 26, 2015, retrieved July 6, 2015 
  10. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-07-25. 

External links

This page was last edited on 25 July 2018, at 13:15
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