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Marion County, Indiana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Marion County
City-County Building
Map of Indiana highlighting Marion County
Location within the U.S. state of Indiana
Map of the United States highlighting Indiana
Indiana's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°47′N 86°08′W / 39.78°N 86.14°W / 39.78; -86.14
Country United States
State Indiana
FoundedApril 1, 1822
Named forFrancis Marion
SeatIndianapolis
Largest cityIndianapolis
Area
 • Total403.01 sq mi (1,043.8 km2)
 • Land396.30 sq mi (1,026.4 km2)
 • Water6.71 sq mi (17.4 km2)  1.66%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2019)
964,582
 • Density2,434/sq mi (940/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts5th, 7th
Websitewww.indy.gov/eGov/County
  • Indiana county number 49
  • Most populous county in Indiana
  • Currently only Unigov county in Indiana

Marion County is located in the U.S. state of Indiana. The 2010 United States Census reported a population of 903,393,[1] making it the largest county in the state and 55th most populated county in the country. The county seat is Indianapolis, the state capital and largest city.[2] Marion County is consolidated with Indianapolis through an arrangement known as Unigov.

Marion County is the central county of the Indianapolis–Carmel–Anderson MSA in Central Indiana.

Geography

The low rolling hills of Marion County have been cleared of trees, and the area is completely devoted to municipal development or to agriculture, except for wooded drainages.[3] The highest point (920 feet/279 meters ASL) is a small ridge at the county's northwest corner.[4]

According to the 2010 census, the county has an area of 403.01 square miles (1,043.8 km2), of which 396.30 square miles (1,026.4 km2) (or 98.34%) is land and 6.71 square miles (17.4 km2) (or 1.66%) is water.[5]

The White River flows southwestward through the central part of the county; it is joined by Eagle Creek and Fall Creek, both of which have dams in the county forming Eagle Creek Reservoir and Geist Reservoir, respectively.

Marion County has two Indiana State Parks, Fort Harrison State Park and White River State Park, as well as many municipal parks.

Adjacent counties

Transportation

Major highways

* I-69 currently ends in Indianapolis at the I-465 interchange in the northeast section of the county. The extension connecting Indianapolis and Evansville is expected to be completed in the mid to late 2020s.

Airports

Control tower at Indianapolis International Airport
Control tower at Indianapolis International Airport

History

Marion County was created on April 1, 1822, from part of the "New Purchase" lands that had been obtained from its inhabitants, the Lenape, by the Treaty of St. Mary's.[8] It is named for Francis Marion, a Brigadier General from South Carolina in the American Revolutionary War.[9]

The state capital was moved to Indianapolis in Marion County from Corydon on January 10, 1825. This began a period of rapid growth in population.[10]

Climate and weather

Indianapolis, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
2.1
 
 
33
18
 
 
2.1
 
 
39
22
 
 
3.1
 
 
50
31
 
 
3.8
 
 
61
41
 
 
4.6
 
 
72
52
 
 
4.1
 
 
81
61
 
 
4.8
 
 
84
65
 
 
3.9
 
 
82
63
 
 
2.6
 
 
76
55
 
 
2.9
 
 
65
43
 
 
3.7
 
 
51
34
 
 
2.8
 
 
39
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[11]

In recent years, average temperatures in Indianapolis have ranged from a low of 18 °F (−8 °C) in January to a high of 84 °F (29 °C) in July, although a record low of −22 °F (−30 °C) was recorded in January 1985 and a record high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded in June 1988. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.05 inches (52 mm) in January to 4.78 inches (121 mm) in July.[11]

Demographics

Age and gender distribution in Marion County
Age and gender distribution in Marion County
Historical population
Census Pop.
18307,192
184016,080123.6%
185024,10349.9%
186039,85565.4%
187071,93980.5%
1880102,78242.9%
1890141,15637.3%
1900197,22739.7%
1910263,66133.7%
1920348,06132.0%
1930422,66621.4%
1940460,9269.1%
1950551,77719.7%
1960697,56726.4%
1970792,29913.6%
1980765,233−3.4%
1990797,1594.2%
2000860,4547.9%
2010903,3935.0%
2019 (est.)964,582[12]6.8%
US Decennial Census[13]
1790-1960[14] 1900-1990[15]
1990-2000[16] 2010-2019[1]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 903,393 people, 366,176 households, and 218,338 families in the county.[17] The population density was 2,279.6 inhabitants per square mile (880.2/km2). There were 417,862 housing units at an average density of 1,054.4 per square mile (407.1/km2).[5] The racial makeup of the county was 62.7% white, 26.7% black or African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 5.4% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 9.3% of the population.[17] In terms of ancestry, 18.9% were German, 11.8% were Irish, 8.4% were English, 6.6% were American, and 5.2% were Subsaharan African.[18]

Of the 366,176 households, 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.9% were married couples living together, 17.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 40.4% were non-families, and 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age was 33.9 years.[17]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $54,142. Males had a median income of $42,215 versus $34,169 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,498. About 13.5% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.7% of those under age 18 and 9.0% of those age 65 or over.[19]

Cities and towns

Marion County has a consolidated city-county government, known as Unigov, in which only four municipalities retain full government autonomy (including a mayor and city council) as "excluded cities". The remaining municipalities within the county are "included towns" and exercise very limited authority, mainly in zoning and appointing their own police departments and maintaining some of their own municipal services and town identities. They retain the ability to levy taxes for these purposes.

Municipalities

Excluded cities in bold.

Townships

Marion County has nine townships roughly organized into a grid-like, three-by-three pattern. This arrangement can be seen below, with the top being north.

Pike Washington Lawrence
Wayne Center Warren
Decatur Perry Franklin

Politics

Most of Marion County is in Indiana's 7th congressional district, which is held by Democrat André Carson. Indiana's 5th congressional district, which runs along the northern edge of the county, is held by Republican Victoria Spartz. The county is represented by 15 seats in the Indiana House of Representatives, 86th through 100th districts, with ten seats held by Democrats and five by Republicans. In the State Senate Marion County is divided among nine districts, which are held by two Democrats and seven Republicans. The Senate districts are numbered 28 through 36.

The Indianapolis City-County Council is the combined legislative body of Indianapolis and Marion County. The consolidated government, known as Unigov, was formally established in 1970 upon the merger of the city government with the county government. The council passes ordinances for the city and county, and makes appointments to certain boards and commissions.

County elected officials
Marion County
Sheriff's Department
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionMarion County, Indiana, United States
Legal jurisdictionAs per operations jurisdiction
General nature
Operational structure
Agency executive
  • John Layton, Sheriff
  • Mayor (County Executive): Joe Hogsett (D)
  • Auditor: Julie Voorhies (D)
  • Clerk: Myla A. Eldrige (D)
  • Coroner: Dr. Lee Sloan (D)
  • Assessor: Joseph P. O'Connor (D)
  • Prosecutor: Ryan Mears (D)
  • Recorder: Kate Sweeney Bell (D)
  • Sheriff: Kerry J. Forestal (D)
  • Surveyor: Debra S. Jenkins (D)
  • Treasurer: Barbara A. Lawrence (D)

The Auditor, Assessor, and Treasurer form the county's Board of Commissioners.

For most of the 20th century, Marion County was considered one of the most conservative urban counties in the nation. Between 1896 and 2000, it went Democratic only four times, in the national landslides of 1932, 1936 and 1964 as well as 1912 when Woodrow Wilson won a plurality in the county. The Republican edge began to lessen considerably in the 1990s, and in 2004 John Kerry became the first Democrat since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 to carry the county. The trend continued in 2008 and 2012 with Barack Obama showing strongly in Marion County, winning 63% and 60% of the vote respectively.

United States presidential election results for Marion County, Indiana[20]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 134,175 34.30% 247,772 63.35% 9,187 2.35%
2016 130,360 35.53% 212,899 58.03% 23,620 6.44%
2012 136,509 37.92% 216,336 60.10% 7,127 1.98%
2008 134,313 35.34% 241,987 63.67% 3,790 1.00%
2004 156,072 48.65% 162,249 50.57% 2,517 0.78%
2000 137,810 49.23% 134,189 47.94% 7,904 2.82%
1996 133,329 47.24% 124,448 44.10% 24,437 8.66%
1992 141,369 43.66% 122,234 37.75% 60,187 18.59%
1988 184,519 58.56% 128,627 40.82% 1,949 0.62%
1984 184,880 58.29% 130,185 41.05% 2,083 0.66%
1980 168,680 53.67% 126,103 40.13% 19,486 6.20%
1976 177,767 54.60% 145,274 44.62% 2,535 0.78%
1972 206,065 66.52% 102,166 32.98% 1,535 0.50%
1968 162,503 52.26% 115,715 37.22% 32,704 10.52%
1964 143,015 48.25% 152,418 51.43% 948 0.32%
1960 166,202 57.67% 121,336 42.10% 668 0.23%
1956 162,566 61.97% 99,102 37.78% 679 0.26%
1952 164,466 60.48% 106,387 39.12% 1,086 0.40%
1948 103,603 50.78% 97,915 47.99% 2,495 1.22%
1944 116,421 52.01% 106,382 47.53% 1,034 0.46%
1940 124,845 50.43% 121,907 49.25% 787 0.32%
1936 87,798 40.54% 124,961 57.71% 3,791 1.75%
1932 98,256 46.20% 106,661 50.15% 7,747 3.64%
1928 109,630 59.55% 73,309 39.82% 1,161 0.63%
1924 95,135 59.13% 59,498 36.98% 6,247 3.88%
1920 79,957 54.93% 61,460 42.22% 4,154 2.85%
1916 40,699 51.50% 35,043 44.34% 3,288 4.16%
1912 12,280 18.22% 29,805 44.22% 25,323 37.57%
1908 34,351 48.67% 34,078 48.28% 2,151 3.05%
1904 35,103 58.54% 22,336 37.25% 2,524 4.21%
1900 29,272 54.24% 23,660 43.84% 1,034 1.92%
1896 27,353 55.98% 20,654 42.27% 853 1.75%
1892 19,551 47.77% 20,426 49.91% 949 2.32%
1888 17,139 48.82% 17,515 49.89% 456 1.30%


See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Marion County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  3. ^ Marion County IN (Google Maps, accessed 31 August 2020)
  4. ^ Marion County High Point, Indiana (PeakBagger.com, accessed 31 August 2020)
  5. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  6. ^ Eagle Creek Airpark (Google Maps, accessed 31 August 2020)
  7. ^ Post Air Airport (Google Maps, accessed 31 August 2020)
  8. ^ Divita, James J. (1994). "Demography and Ethnicity". In Bodenhamer, David J.; Barrows, Robert G. (eds.). The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. pp. 51–52. ISBN 0-253-31222-1. Retrieved July 30, 2013.
  9. ^ Baker, Ronald L.; Marvin Carmony (1995). Indiana Place Names. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 98. ISBN 0-253-28340-X.
  10. ^ De Witt Clinton Goodrich & Charles Richard Tuttle (1875). An Illustrated History of the State of Indiana. Indiana: R. S. Peale & co. p. 566.
  11. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Indianapolis IN". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  12. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  13. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  14. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  15. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  16. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  17. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  18. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  19. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  20. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 April 2021, at 20:40
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