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Lawrence County, Indiana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lawrence County, Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Location in the state of Indiana
Indiana's location in the U.S.
Indiana's location in the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°48′N 86°33′W / 38.800°N 86.550°W / 38.800; -86.550
Country United States
State Indiana
Founded1818
Named forJames Lawrence
County seatBedford
Largest cityBedford (population and area)
Incorporated
Municipalities
Government
 • TypeCounty
 • BodyBoard of Commissioners
Area
 • Total451.93 sq mi (1,170.5 km2)
 • Land449.17 sq mi (1,163.3 km2)
 • Water2.76 sq mi (7.1 km2)
Area rank20th largest county in Indiana
Elevation502 ft (153 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total46,134
 • Estimate 
(2018)
45,668
 • Rank31st largest county in Indiana
1,050th largest county in U.S.[2]
 • Density103/sq mi (40/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (Eastern)
ZIP Codes
47264, 47420-21, 47436-37, 47446, 47451, 47462, 47467, 47470
Area code812 and 930
Congressional district9th
Indiana Senate district44th
Indiana House of Representatives districts65th and 73rd
FIPS code18-093
GNIS feature ID0451703
  • Indiana county number 47

Lawrence County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2010, the population was 46,134.[3] The county seat is Bedford.[4]

Lawrence County comprises the Bedford, IN Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Until the Battle of Tippecanoe, the general area of Lawrence County was populated primarily by Native Americans. The first trace of white settlement in Lawrence County was near Leesville; however, Bono was the first white settlement in the county.[5] Lawrence County was formed in 1818 by subdividing Orange County.[6] The English name refers to Captain James Lawrence,[7] who uttered the famous words "Don't give up the ship." after being mortally wounded during the War of 1812. Prior to Lawrence County's creation, it was organized as "Leatherwood Township." On March 11, 1818, the county commissioners Ambrose Carlton, Thomas Beagley, and James Stotts, met at the home of James Gregory. On the third day of this session, the commissioners proceeded to divide the county into two civil townships: Shawswick and Spice Valley.[8][9] Early in 1819, the board adopted a seal for Lawrence County, which was designed with a harp, a plow, three sheaves of weat, a pair of scales, and a weathercock on top. The first county seat of Lawrence County was located at Palestine, situated on a high bluff near the East Fork of the White River. 276 lots were laid out in Palestine, which were advertised for sale on May 25, 1818. Steps were immediately taken to build a courthouse and a jail. The first courthouse of the county was log and erected in the spring of 1818. This courthouse was temporary, and steps to construct a permanent courthouse began in November 1818. It was first designed in octagonal form, with brick walls, a stone foundation, with 45 windows and to be two stories tall. The courthouse was finished in the autumn of 1821, at a total cost of $5,500 (1821 USD).[10] After much disease, and a tornado that swept through the area in 1820, the county approved the relocation of the county seat on February 9, 1825. The name "Bedford" was selected for the new county seat by Joseph Rawlins, a local businessman, after Bedford County, Virginia. The town was laid out on March 30, 1825, and current residents of Palestine were offered a lot in Bedford. The county records were hauled from Palestine to Bedford by Richard Evans.[11][12] In early 1825, a temporary log courthouse was erected at Bedford. In 1831, the board of commissioners took up the matter of building a more suitable courthouse and adertised bids for a courthouse similar to the one at Salem in May, and there obtained complete plans of that structure. The old buildings at Palestine were sold, and the proceeds were to be used in the construction of the new building. The building was finished in May 1834. A fourth courthouse was built was built in 1872. The fifth and current courthouse was built in 1930.[13] Perry Township was created in May 1822, and Indian Creek Township was extended south to the river. Around the same time, Flinn Township was created. On January 23, 1826, Marion Township was created, followed by Marshall Township in June 1855. In March 1866, 180 residents petitioned for a new township, called "Morton", to be formed out of Shawswick, Bono, and Flinn, but after much thought was named Guthrie Township after an old pioneer family of the county. On January 1, 1911, Flinn Township was annexed by Shawswick, Guthrie, and Pleasant Run Townships, after the county commissioners meeting a month prior.[14]

Geography

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 451.93 square miles (1,170.5 km2), of which 449.17 square miles (1,163.3 km2) (or 99.39%) is land and 2.76 square miles (7.1 km2) (or 0.61%) is water.[15]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected area

Municipalities

Cities and Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Former communities

  • Armstrong
  • Beck's
  • Bottomville
  • Burton
  • Caseyville
  • Cross Lanes
  • Dark Hollow
  • Deal
  • Dixonville
  • Dodd
  • Dog Fennel
  • Fairview
  • Fishing Creek
  • Five Points
  • Flatwood Hollow
  • Genoda
  • Goat Run
  • Goosetown
  • Grayson
  • Grindstone Hollow
  • Heathen Bend
  • Hog Holler
  • Horseshoe Bend
  • Jones' Defeat
  • Jugtown
  • Kentucky Hollow
  • Leatherwood
  • Liberty
  • Lickskillet
  • Lookout
  • Marysville
  • Maul Ridge
  • Miles Standish
  • Morgiana
  • Opposition
  • Palestine
  • Pattonville
  • Paul
  • Reed's Station
  • Rockledge
  • Sand Pit
  • Scottville
  • Sinking Spring
  • Speed Hollow
  • Stringtown
  • Sunset
  • Torphytown
  • Wolf Creek[16][17]

Townships

Local sights

Astronauts

Lawrence County has had several native residents that have become astronauts over the years. They include:

The Virgil I. Gus Grissom Memorial, located at the Spring Mill State Park near Mitchell, has many mementos of his career, including the space capsule he commanded, "The Molly Brown" from Gemini 3.[18]

Climate and weather

Bedford, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
2.8
 
 
37
18
 
 
2.7
 
 
43
22
 
 
3.8
 
 
53
31
 
 
4.5
 
 
64
40
 
 
5
 
 
74
51
 
 
4.1
 
 
82
60
 
 
4.5
 
 
86
64
 
 
4.2
 
 
85
62
 
 
3.1
 
 
79
53
 
 
3.2
 
 
67
41
 
 
3.9
 
 
54
33
 
 
3.3
 
 
42
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[19]

In recent years, average temperatures in Bedford have ranged from a low of 18 °F (−8 °C) in January to a high of 86 °F (30 °C) in July, although a record low of −29 °F (−34 °C) was recorded in January 1994 and a record high of 111 °F (44 °C) was recorded in July 1930. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.70 inches (69 mm) in February to 5.04 inches (128 mm) in May.[19]

Government

The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.

County Council: The county council is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. Representatives are elected from county districts. The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[20][21]

Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[20][21]

Court: The county maintains a small claims court that can handle some civil cases. The judge on the court is elected to a term of four years and must be a member of the Indiana Bar Association. The judge is assisted by a constable who is also elected to a four-year term. In some cases, court decisions can be appealed to the state level circuit court.[21]

County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[21]

Lawrence County is part of Indiana's 9th congressional district; Indiana Senate district 44;[22] and Indiana House of Representatives districts 65 and 73.[23]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[24]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 73.3% 14,035 22.0% 4,210 4.7% 907
2012 65.0% 11,622 32.3% 5,779 2.6% 469
2008 59.5% 11,018 38.9% 7,208 1.7% 308
2004 69.0% 12,207 30.2% 5,346 0.8% 145
2000 66.1% 10,677 31.4% 5,071 2.4% 394
1996 50.6% 8,107 35.6% 5,703 13.7% 2,199
1992 46.0% 7,712 33.1% 5,557 20.9% 3,512
1988 64.7% 10,742 34.9% 5,787 0.4% 70
1984 66.7% 11,440 32.7% 5,608 0.6% 102
1980 62.7% 10,846 33.7% 5,826 3.6% 624
1976 53.2% 9,278 45.3% 7,908 1.5% 254
1972 71.6% 10,936 28.0% 4,278 0.5% 70
1968 54.4% 8,830 32.9% 5,349 12.7% 2,069
1964 48.3% 8,186 51.2% 8,677 0.6% 93
1960 61.2% 11,119 38.4% 6,977 0.5% 86
1956 63.9% 11,090 35.7% 6,197 0.3% 59
1952 64.6% 11,296 34.6% 6,044 0.8% 135
1948 58.1% 8,643 41.2% 6,131 0.6% 95
1944 63.4% 9,200 36.1% 5,246 0.5% 69
1940 61.9% 10,717 37.9% 6,553 0.2% 38
1936 54.9% 9,982 44.4% 8,062 0.7% 134
1932 49.7% 8,314 49.1% 8,215 1.3% 212
1928 68.7% 9,844 30.9% 4,428 0.4% 57
1924 60.7% 7,438 36.0% 4,414 3.3% 402
1920 58.2% 6,808 40.2% 4,709 1.6% 191
1916 52.6% 3,813 42.8% 3,108 4.6% 335
1912 23.9% 1,633 37.7% 2,579 38.4% 2,628[25]
1908 53.8% 3,884 43.2% 3,118 3.1% 222
1904 57.9% 3,924 39.4% 2,672 2.6% 178
1900 57.1% 3,535 41.3% 2,558 1.6% 101
1896 55.7% 3,103 43.5% 2,421 0.8% 47
1892 52.1% 2,529 44.0% 2,134 3.9% 190
1888 55.2% 2,256 44.4% 1,814 0.3% 14

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18204,116
18309,234124.3%
184011,78227.6%
185012,0972.7%
186013,69213.2%
187014,6286.8%
188018,54326.8%
189019,7926.7%
190025,72930.0%
191030,62519.0%
192028,228−7.8%
193035,58326.1%
194035,045−1.5%
195034,346−2.0%
196036,5646.5%
197038,0384.0%
198042,47211.7%
199042,8360.9%
200045,9227.2%
201046,1340.5%
2018 (est.)45,668[26]−1.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[27]
1790-1960[28] 1900-1990[29]
1990-2000[30] 2010-2013[3]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 46,134 people, 18,811 households, and 12,906 families residing in the county.[31] The population density was 102.7 inhabitants per square mile (39.7/km2). There were 21,074 housing units at an average density of 46.9 per square mile (18.1/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 97.3% white, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.3% American Indian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.2% of the population.[31] In terms of ancestry, 18.4% were German, 14.6% were Irish, 13.1% were American, and 10.4% were English.[32]

Of the 18,811 households, 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.4% were non-families, and 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.92. The median age was 41.6 years.[31]

The median income for a household in the county was $47,697 and the median income for a family was $50,355. Males had a median income of $42,337 versus $30,386 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,352. About 10.9% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.4% of those under age 18 and 10.6% of those age 65 or over.[33]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Lawrence County". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  2. ^ "USA Counties in Profile". STATS Indiana. Retrieved 2015-01-18.
  3. ^ a b "Lawrence County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2011-06-07. Retrieved 2011-09-25.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. ^ "History of Lawrence County, Indiana". INGenWeb. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  6. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 64.
  7. ^ History of Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, Indiana: From the Earliest Time to the Present, Together with Interesting Biographical Sketches, Reminiscences, Notes, Etc. Higginson Book Company. 1884. p. 34.
  8. ^ "Lawrence County's Bicentennial". Limestone County. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  9. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 66.
  10. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 77-79.
  11. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 73-75.
  12. ^ Buher, Becky. "Bedford was second county seat". Hoosier Times. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  13. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 79-80.
  14. ^ History of Lawrence and Monroe Counties, Indiana: Their People, Industries, and Institutions. B.F. Bowen. 1914. p. 67-70.
  15. ^ a b "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-12. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  16. ^ https://www.in.gov/library/files/Nord%20Mapping%20Lawrence%20County%20corrected.pdf
  17. ^ http://ingenweb.org/inlawrence/towns.htm
  18. ^ [1], Virgil I. Gus Grissom Memorial
  19. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Bedford, Indiana". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 2011-01-27.
  20. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16.
  21. ^ a b c d Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2" (PDF). IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16.
  22. ^ "Indiana Senate Districts" (PDF). State of Indiana. Retrieved 2015-01-19.
  23. ^ "Indiana House Districts" (PDF). State of Indiana. Retrieved 2015-01-19.
  24. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-05-18.
  25. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 2,106 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 398 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 91 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 33 votes.
  26. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  27. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  28. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  29. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  30. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  31. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  32. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-14. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  33. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-14. Retrieved 2015-07-10.

External links

This page was last edited on 18 September 2020, at 10:36
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