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Whitestown, Indiana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Whitestown, Indiana
Whitestown's Anson development in 2019
Whitestown's Anson development in 2019
Location of Whitestown in Boone County, Indiana.
Location of Whitestown in Boone County, Indiana.
Coordinates: 39°59′46″N 86°20′41″W / 39.99611°N 86.34472°W / 39.99611; -86.34472
CountryUnited States
StateIndiana
CountyBoone
TownshipsWorth, Perry, Eagle
Area
 • Total13.85 sq mi (35.88 km2)
 • Land13.85 sq mi (35.88 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
938 ft (286 m)
Population
 • Total2,867
 • Estimate 
(2018)[3]
8,627
 • Density475.67/sq mi (183.66/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
46075
Area code(s)317
FIPS code18-84014[4]
GNIS feature ID0445978[5]
Websitewww.whitestown.in.gov

Whitestown is a town in Boone County, Indiana, United States. The population was 2,867 at the 2010 census. The town is located near Interstate 65, approximately 22 miles (35 km) northwest of Downtown Indianapolis, and about 7 miles (11 km) from the northern city limits of Indianapolis, between exits 130 and 133.

History

Whitestown was laid out in 1851 when the railroad was extended to that point.[6] It was likely named for Albert Smith White, a U.S. Senator from Indiana.[7][8] The first post office in Whitestown was established in 1853.[9]

In the late 2000s, Whitestown annexed 6,500 acres south of the historic downtown district.[10] A master planned, mixed-use development named for U.S. Army officer and Boone County native Anson Mills was established in this area in 2005. The Great Recession adversely impacted the Anson project's original construction schedule, but residential, retail, and commercial growth gained momentum starting in 2011 and continues to this day.[11][12] The Anson development now features a large selection of retail, including a Meijer supercenter,[13] a Lowe's home improvement store,[14] and several fashion and lifestyle stores including Burlington Coat Factory, Shoe Dept. Encore, TJ Maxx, Hobby Lobby, and Five Below.[15]

From 2010 until current day, Whitestown has been the fastest-growing municipality in Indiana,[16] more than doubling in population between 2010 and 2017.[17]

Geography

Whitestown is located at 39°59′46″N 86°20′41″W / 39.99611°N 86.34472°W / 39.99611; -86.34472 (39.996136, -86.344612).[18]

According to the 2010 census, the town has a total area of 10.46 square miles (27.1 km2), all land.[19]

Transportation

Highways

Airports
There are no airports located within Whitestown town limits. The nearest public use airports are:

The nearest commercial airport which currently has scheduled airline service is Indianapolis International Airport (IND), located approximately 25 miles (40 km) south of Whitestown.

Railroads and Trails
The Lafayette and Indianapolis Railroad line traversing Whitestown was owned and operated by a number of companies from its inception in 1851 until it was abandoned in 1976.[20][21] In 2015, Whitestown began re-purposing portions of the former railroad line as a shared use path. It is currently known as Big 4 Heritage Trail. Upon completion, the trail will cover 2.4 miles (3.9 km) through the town.[22]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950550
196061311.5%
1970569−7.2%
1980497−12.7%
1990476−4.2%
2000471−1.1%
20102,867508.7%
Est. 20188,627[3]200.9%

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,867 people, 1,053 households, and 774 families living in the town. The population density was 274.1 inhabitants per square mile (105.8/km2). There were 1,144 housing units at an average density of 109.4 per square mile (42.2/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 90.9% White, 2.8% African American, 0.1% Native American, 2.9% Asian, 1.1% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.5% of the population.

There were 1,053 households of which 44.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.5% were non-families. Of all households 18.5% were made up of individuals and 3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.14.

The median age in the town was 30 years. 30.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 42% were from 25 to 44; 17.5% were from 45 to 64; and 4.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 50.5% male and 49.5% female.

2000 census

In the census[4] of 2000, there were 471 people, 175 households, and 131 families living in the town. The population density was 1,843.9 people per square mile (699.4/km²). There were 187 housing units at an average density of 732.1 per square mile (277.7/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 99.15% White, 0.21% Asian, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population.

There were 175 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.7% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.6% were non-families. Of all households 20.6% were made up of individuals and 4.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the town, the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 37.4% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 7.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $46,528, and the median income for a family was $47,917. Males had a median income of $32,031 versus $25,893 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,674. About 8.1% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Education

Public school students in Whitestown are served by two systems: those in Worth Township and Perry Township attend schools operated by Lebanon Community School Corporation, while those in Eagle Township attend Zionsville Community Schools.

Traders Point Christian Schools, a private K-12 school operated as a ministry of Traders Point Christian Church, is also located in Whitestown.

No public libraries are located within Whitestown town limits. Whitestown residents are provided library services through contractual agreements with Hussey-Mayfield Memorial Public Library in Zionsville and Lebanon Public Library in Lebanon.[23]

References

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 28, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-11.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder.census.gov. U. S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 19 October 2016. Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ Early Life and Times in Boone County, Indiana. Carlon & Hollenbeck. 1887. p. 52.
  7. ^ Baker, Ronald L. (October 1995). From Needmore to Prosperity: Hoosier Place Names in Folklore and History. Indiana University Press. p. 347. ISBN 978-0-253-32866-3. ...probably for Albert S. White...
  8. ^ McMakin, Catherine (1951). History of Whitestown, Indiana (PDF). Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  9. ^ "Boone County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  10. ^ "Whitestown Downtown Revitalization Plan" (PDF). Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  11. ^ "Mixed-use Anson gains momentum after slow start". IBJ. Retrieved 10 February 2017.
  12. ^ "Anson Fact Sheet" (PDF). Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  13. ^ "Whitestown/Zionsville - Meijer". Meijer.com.
  14. ^ "LOWE'S OF ZIONSVILLE, IN - Store #2766". Lowes.com.
  15. ^ Quinn, Samm. "Whitestown exit along I-65 explodes with retailers, fast food". Indianapolis Business Journal.
  16. ^ "Whitestown and Westfield among fastest growing cities in Indiana". Indianapolis Star.
  17. ^ Kinghorn, Matt (July–August 2018). "Indy-area suburbs dominate list of Indiana's fastest-growing communities". InContext. Retrieved 2018-07-10.
  18. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  19. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files for Places – Indiana". United States Census. Retrieved 2012-04-21.
  20. ^ "Lafayette to Indianapolis - Abandoned Rails". www.abandonedrails.com.
  21. ^ https://www.in.gov/indot/files/Rail_STBFilings.pdf
  22. ^ Pearl, Elizabeth. "Whitestown considers land purchase for Big 4". Times Sentinel. Retrieved 21 October 2017.
  23. ^ "Libraries in Boone County, Indiana". Boone County Community Network. Retrieved 23 March 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 29 March 2020, at 11:13
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