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Super Bowl television ratings

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Satellite trucks broadcasting from Super Bowl XXXV. The game was watched by more than 84 million people in the United States.
Satellite trucks broadcasting from Super Bowl XXXV. The game was watched by more than 84 million people in the United States.

Super Bowl television ratings have traditionally been high. One of the most watched annual sporting events in the world, the NFL's championship game is broadcast in over 130 countries in more than 30 languages.[1] However, viewership is predominantly North American;[2][3] the Super Bowl is the most watched television broadcast in the United States every year.[4]

United States

English

The Super Bowl is noted for its enduring ratings. While viewership for prime time series and other sports such as baseball has declined over time, viewership of the Super Bowl has remained stable.[5][6] In fact, the Super Bowl is the American sports broadcast with the most consistent ratings,[7] and draws substantially higher ratings than other sports events, including the NBA Finals and World Series.[8]

Ratings for the Super Bowl first peaked from 1977 to 1987, when no less than 44.4% of American households with television sets would watch.[5] From the late 2000s to mid-2010s, ratings peaked again—viewership grew for all but one broadcast from 2006 to 2015. This was attributed to the NFL's broadened appeal to female and Hispanic audiences, as well as the league's ability to prop up "high-profile" players in the media;[9] female viewership grew every year from 2003 to 2008.[10] However, the 2019 game became the least-watched in more than a decade and the household rating for the Super Bowl declined for the fourth consecutive year.[11]

The 1982 game remains the highest-rated Super Bowl broadcast; it earned a 49.1 household rating. Viewership peaked in 2015; Super Bowl XLIX was watched by over 114.4 million people.[12]

List of Super Bowl television ratings in the United States with average viewers, total viewers, average households, household rating and share,
18–49 rating and share and average cost of 30-second ad, showing the period they were measured between, Super Bowl, date and network aired on
Super
Bowl
Date Period of ratings
measurement (ET)
Network Average viewers Total viewers Average households Household rating 18–49 rating Avg. cost per 30 sec.
of advertising
Start End Rating Share Rating Share
I January 15, 1967 Unknown Unknown CBS 26,750,000[13] 39,900,000[14] 12,410,000[13] 22.6[13] 43[13] Unknown Unknown $42,500[13]
NBC 24,430,000[13] 35,600,000[14] 10,160,000[13] 18.5[13] 36[13] Unknown Unknown $37,500[13]
II January 14, 1968 Unknown Unknown CBS 39,120,000[13] 51,300,000[14] 20,610,000[13] 36.8[13] 68[13] Unknown Unknown $54,500[13]
III January 12, 1969 Unknown Unknown NBC 41,660,000[13] 54,500,000[14] 20,520,000[13] 36.0[13] 70[13] Unknown Unknown $55,000[13]
IV January 11, 1970 Unknown Unknown CBS 44,270,000[13] 59,200,000[14] 23,050,000[13] 39.4[13] 69[13] Unknown Unknown $78,200[13]
V January 17, 1971 Unknown Unknown NBC 46,040,000[13] 58,500,000[14] 23,980,000[13] 39.9[13] 75[13] Unknown Unknown $72,500[13]
VI January 16, 1972 Unknown Unknown CBS 56,640,000[13] 67,300,000[14] 27,450,000[13] 44.2[13] 74[13] Unknown Unknown $86,100[13]
VII January 14, 1973 Unknown Unknown NBC 53,320,000[13] 67,700,000[14] 27,670,000[13] 42.7[13] 72[13] Unknown Unknown $88,100[13]
VIII January 13, 1974 Unknown Unknown CBS 51,700,000[13] 63,200,000[14] 27,540,000[13] 41.6[13] 73[13] Unknown Unknown $103,500[13]
IX January 12, 1975 Unknown Unknown NBC 56,050,000[13] 71,300,000[14] 29,040,000[13] 42.4[13] 72[13] Unknown Unknown $107,000[13]
X January 18, 1976 Unknown Unknown CBS 57,710,000[13] 73,300,000[14] 29,440,000[13] 42.3[13] 78[13] Unknown Unknown $110,000[13]
XI January 9, 1977 Unknown Unknown NBC 62,050,000[13] 81,900,000[14] 31,610,000[13] 44.4[13] 73[13] Unknown Unknown $125,000[13]
XII January 15, 1978 6:00 pm[15] Unknown CBS 78,940,000[13] 102,010,000[16] 34,410,000[13] 47.2[13] 67[13] Unknown Unknown $162,300[13]
XIII January 21, 1979 4:00 pm[15] Unknown NBC 74,740,000[13] 96,630,000[16] 35,090,000[13] 47.1[13] 74[13] Unknown Unknown $185,000[13]
XIV January 20, 1980 6:00 pm[17] Unknown CBS 76,240,000[13] 97,800,000[14] 35,330,000[13] 46.3[13] 67[13] Unknown Unknown $222,000[13]
XV January 25, 1981 6:00 pm[18] Unknown NBC 68,290,000[13] 94,120,000[16] 34,540,000[13] 44.4[13] 63[13] Unknown Unknown $275,000[13]
XVI January 24, 1982 4:00 pm[19] 7:50 pm[19] CBS 85,240,000[13] 110,230,000[16] 40,020,000[13] 49.1[13] 73[13] Unknown Unknown $324,300[13]
XVII January 30, 1983 Unknown 9:30 pm[20] NBC 81,770,000[13] 109,040,000[21] 40,480,000[13] 48.6[13] 69[13] Unknown Unknown $400,000[13]
XVIII January 22, 1984 4:30 pm[22] 8:15 pm[22] CBS 77,620,000[13] 105,200,000[14] 38,880,000[13] 46.4[13] 71[13] Unknown Unknown $368,200[13]
XIX January 20, 1985 6:15 pm[23] 9:30 pm[23] ABC 85,530,000[13] 115,936,000[24] 39,390,000[13] 46.4[13] 63[13] Unknown Unknown $525,000[13]
XX January 26, 1986 5:15 pm[25] 9:00 pm[25] NBC 92,570,000[13] 127,055,000[26] 41,490,000[13] 48.3[13] 70[13] Unknown Unknown $550,000[13]
XXI January 25, 1987 Unknown Unknown CBS 87,190,000[13] 119,700,000[14] 40,030,000[13] 45.8[13] 66[13] Unknown Unknown $600,000[13]
XXII January 31, 1988 Unknown 10:09 pm[27] ABC 80,140,000[13] 114,600,000[14] 37,120,000[13] 41.9[13] 62[13] Unknown Unknown $645,000[13]
XXIII January 22, 1989 Unknown Unknown NBC 81,590,000[13] 110,800,000[14] 39,320,000[13] 43.5[13] 68[13] Unknown Unknown $675,000[13]
XXIV January 28, 1990 Unknown Unknown CBS 73,852,000[13] 109,000,000[14] 35,920,000[13] 39.0[13] 63[13] Unknown Unknown $700,400[13]
XXV January 27, 1991 Unknown Unknown ABC 79,510,000[13] 112,100,000[14] 39,010,000[13] 41.9[13] 63[13] Unknown Unknown $800,000[13]
XXVI January 26, 1992 Unknown Unknown CBS 79,590,000[13] 119,680,000[24] 37,120,000[13] 40.3[13] 61[13] Unknown Unknown $850,000[13]
XXVII January 31, 1993 Unknown Unknown NBC 90,990,000[13] 133,400,000[14] 41,990,000[13] 45.1[13] 66[13] Unknown Unknown $850,000[13]
XXVIII January 30, 1994 Unknown Unknown 90,000,000[13] 134,800,000[14] 42,860,000[13] 45.5[13] 66[13] 39.9[28] 76[28] $900,000[13]
XXIX January 29, 1995 7:00 pm[29] 10:30 pm[29] ABC 83,420,000[13] 125,216,000[24] 39,400,000[13] 41.3[13] 62[13] Unknown Unknown $1,150,000[13]
XXX January 28, 1996 Unknown Unknown NBC 94,080,000[13] 138,488,000[14] 44,145,000[13] 46.0[13] 68[13] 41.2[30] Unknown $1,085,000[13]
XXXI January 26, 1997 6:26 pm[31] 9:52 pm[31] Fox 87,870,000[13] 128,900,000[14] 42,000,000[13] 43.3[13] 65[13] Unknown Unknown $1,200,000[13]
XXXII January 25, 1998 Unknown 9:55 pm[32] NBC 90,000,000[13] 133,400,000[14] 43,630,000[13] 44.5[13] 67[13] 38.7[33] Unknown $1,291,100[13]
XXXIII January 31, 1999 Unknown Unknown Fox 83,720,000[13] 127,500,000[14] 39,992,000[13] 40.2[13] 61[13] 36.4[34] 71[34] $1,600,000[13]
XXXIV January 30, 2000 Unknown Unknown ABC 88,465,000[13] 130,744,800[14] 43,618,000[13] 43.3[13] 63[13] 37.9[35] 70[35] $2,100,000[13]
XXXV January 28, 2001 Unknown Unknown CBS 84,335,000[13] 131,200,000[14] 41,270,000[13] 40.4[13] 61[13] 35.8[36] 71[36] $2,200,000[13]
XXXVI February 3, 2002 6:40 pm[37] 10:10 pm[37] Fox 86,801,000[13] 131,700,000[14] 42,664,000[13] 40.4[13] 61[13] 34.7[37] 70[37] $2,200,000[13]
XXXVII January 26, 2003 Unknown 10:18 pm[38] ABC 88,637,000[13] 138,900,000[14] 43,433,000[13] 40.7[13] 61[13] 36.4[39] 70[39] $2,200,000[13]
XXXVIII February 1, 2004 Unknown Unknown CBS 89,795,000[13] 144,400,000[14] 44,908,000[13] 41.4[13] 63[13] 35.7[40] 72[40] $2,302,200[13]
XXXIX February 6, 2005 Unknown Unknown Fox 86,072,000[13] 133,700,000[14] 45,081,000[13] 41.1[13] 62[13] 33.2[41] 68[41] $2,400,000[13]
XL February 5, 2006 6:26 pm[41] 10:10 pm[41] ABC 90,745,000[13] 141,400,000[42] 45,867,000[13] 41.6[13] 62[13] 34.6[41] 69[41] $2,500,000[13]
XLI February 4, 2007 6:30 pm[43] 10:00 pm[43] CBS 93,184,000[13] 139,770,000[44] 47,505,000[13] 42.6[13] 64[13] 35.2[44] 70[44] $2,385,365[13]
XLII February 3, 2008 6:31 pm[45] 10:12 pm[45] Fox 97,448,000[13] 148,300,000[46] 48,665,000[13] 43.1[13] 65[13] 37.5[47] 73[47] $2,699,963[13]
XLIII February 1, 2009 6:32 pm[48] 10:16 pm[48] NBC 98,732,000[13] 151,600,000[48] 48,139,000[13] 42.0[13] 64[13] 36.7[48] 72[48] $3,000,000[13]
XLIV February 7, 2010 6:31 pm[49] 9:50 pm[49] CBS 106,476,000[13] 153,400,000[50] 51,728,000[13] 45.0[13] 68[13] 38.6[50] 75[50] $2,800,000[13]
XLV February 6, 2011 6:34 pm[51] 10:13 pm[51] Fox 111,041,000[13] 162,900,000[52] 53,282,000[13] 46.0[13] 69[13] 39.9[51] 77[51] $2,948,649[13]
XLVI February 5, 2012 6:31 pm[53] 9:58 pm[53] NBC 111,346,000[13] 159,200,000[54] 53,910,000[13] 47.0[13] 71[13] 40.5[53] 78[53] $3,442,752[13]
XLVII February 3, 2013 6:30 pm[55][A] 10:17 pm[55][A] CBS 108,693,000[13] 164,100,000[54] 52,998,000[13] 46.4[13] 69[13] 39.7[55] 77[55] $3,765,130[13]
XLVIII February 2, 2014 6:33 pm[58] 9:55 pm[58] Fox 112,191,000[13] Unknown 54,134,000[13] 46.7[13] 69[13] 39.3[58] 77[58] $4,084,864[13]
XLIX February 1, 2015 6:31 pm[59] 10:10 pm[59] NBC 114,442,000[13] 161,300,000[60] 55,341,000[13] 47.5[13] 71[13] 39.1[61] 79[61] $4,283,129[13]
50 February 7, 2016 6:39 pm[62] 10:22 pm[62] CBS 111,864,000[13] 167,000,000[63] 54,251,000[13] 46.6[13] 72[13] 37.7[62] 79[62] $4,800,000[13]
LI February 5, 2017 6:37 pm[64] 10:35 pm[64] Fox 111,319,000[13] 172,000,000[65] 53,650,000[13] 45.3[13] 70[13] 37.1[64] 79[64] $5,399,873[13]
LII February 4, 2018 6:31 pm[66] 10:25 pm[66] NBC 103,471,000[13] Unknown 51,500,000[13] 43.1[13] 68[13] 33.4[66] 78[66] $5,235,379[13]
LIII February 3, 2019 6:32 pm[67] 10:05 pm[67] CBS 98,477,000[13] 149,000,000[68] 49,320,000[13] 41.1[13] 67[13] 31.0[67] 78[67] $5,199,916[13]
LIV February 2, 2020 6:41 pm[69] 10:11 pm[69] Fox 100,446,000[69] 148,500,000[70] 50,200,000[13] 41.6[69] 69[69] 30.1[69] 77[69] ≤$5,600,000[71]

1967–79

Super Bowl I was played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The broadcast attracted the highest share of any game—a 79—as it was the only to air on two networks.
Super Bowl I was played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The broadcast attracted the highest share of any game—a 79—as it was the only to air on two networks.

The first championship game was dubbed the "Super Nielsen Bowl" by the media.[72][73] Variety predicted that the ratings for the game would be the most important of the year. At the time, CBS held the broadcasting rights to NFL games and NBC held the rights to AFL games.[74] With one team from each league competing against each other, the two networks agreed to pay $1 million each to simulcast Super Bowl I.[75] As NFL games on CBS rated double those of AFL games on NBC during the regular season, CBS was able to charge advertisers tens of thousands of dollars more than NBC for 60-second commercials during the broadcast.[74][76] For years, CBS had held the reputation of being "the pro football network," and was expected to live up to it.[75][76] Preliminary ratings for the game—which was controversially blacked out in Greater Los Angeles[72]—were released a day later and showed that the CBS feed was more popular than the NBC.[77] Three weeks later, this was confirmed when the national Nielsen ratings were released, crowning CBS the winner of the first "network Nielsen Bowl."[78]

Unlike Super Bowl I, the 1968 game was broadcast by only one network, CBS. The preliminary Arbitron ratings as reported by the network gave the game a 43.0 rating, a 76 share, and a total viewership of over 70 million.[79] However, the final Nielsen numbers later revealed the game was watched by 51.3 million total viewers and received a 36.8 rating and a 68 share—less than Super Bowl I.[14] In New York City, the game received a 36.3 rating and a 61 share.[80] 1969's Super Bowl III received an initial rating of 39.9 and a share of 79 with over 60 million total viewers. In New York City, the game registered a preliminary rating of 40.5 on NBC, more than eight times the combined rating of CBS and ABC broadcasts at the same time.[81] Final numbers gave Super Bowl III a national rating of 36.0, lower than the previous year, though the total viewership was up from 51.3 million to 54.5 million.[14]

In contrast with previous years, Super Bowl IV's ratings were largely underestimated. Overnight Nielsen ratings gave the 1970 game a 38.8 rating and a 70 share, with 57 million total viewers; final numbers gave the game a 39.4 rating, 69 share, and 59.2 million total viewers.[14][82] The 1971 game was watched by 39.8% of American households, making the NBC broadcast the highest-rated sports event on a single network, beating the final game of the 1963 World Series[83] This record would be broken again the following year when the 1972 CBS broadcast of Super Bowl VI was watched by 44.2% of households.[84] In 1973, Super Bowl VII was the first game to be exempt from a local television blackout following the amendment of an NFL policy requiring them at the time. Although 3 million more households were able to watch the game,[85] the number of households that actually watched it increased by only 220,000 compared to the previous year, and the rating declined from a 44.2 to a 42.7.[13] Likewise in 1974, the rating declined again to a 41.6, and total viewership for the game was 4.5 million less than the year before.[14]

The 1975 Super Bowl was televised for five hours on NBC.[86] As a result, the number of viewers who watched at least six minutes of the broadcast (total viewers) increased from 63.2 million to 71.3 million—a new record for the game.[14] The rating and average viewership also increased compared to the previous year.[13] With the Steelers winning the game, the broadcast in Pittsburgh attracted a preliminary rating of 63 and a share of 88 in the city, meaning 88% of the households in the city with television sets in use were watching it.[87] In Los Angeles, the game received a 78% share of the audience, compared to the combined shares of the broadcasts on CBS and ABC at the same time of 4%.[88] Super Bowl X also saw an increase in ratings; total viewership for the 1976 game increased by 2 million compared to the previous year and the national audience share was 78%, which remains the highest-ever number for the game on a single network.[14]

In 1977, Super Bowl XI was watched by 81.9 million total viewers, beating the Game 7 viewership of the 1975 World Series and becoming the most-watched sports broadcast in American history.[89] The rating of 44.4 and average viewership of 62.1 million also set new records for the game[13]—all of which would be broken the following year when Super Bowl XII was the first to be broadcast in prime time in the Eastern Time Zone.[90] As a result, total viewership grew by over 20 million and the 1978 game became the most-watched single-network broadcast in U.S. history; 102 million viewers watched at least five minutes.[14][91] The audience share decreased to an all-time low, but the rating increased to a 47.2 from a 44.4 and average viewership increased by over 16 million compared the previous year, setting new highs for the game.[13] In 1979, the Super Bowl XIII broadcast recorded a drop in both average and total viewership, and the rating decreased by 0.1 to a 47.1, though all were the second-best numbers ever for the game and the share grew by 7 percentage points to a 74.[13][14][15]

1980–89

1990–99

2000–09

2010–19

Spanish

Due to a growing Hispanic football fanbase, the NFL partnered with Fox Deportes to carry the first Spanish-language broadcast of the Super Bowl by a U.S. channel in 2014.[92]

Super Bowl Date Channel Avg. U.S. viewers
XLVIII February 2, 2014 Fox Deportes 561,000[65]
XLIX February 1, 2015 NBC Universo 368,000[93]
50 February 7, 2016 ESPN Deportes 472,000[94]
LI February 5, 2017 Fox Deportes 654,000[70]
LII February 4, 2018 Universo 543,000[93]
LIII February 3, 2019 ESPN Deportes 473,000[95]
LIV February 2, 2020 Fox Deportes 757,000[70]

International

Canada

The Super Bowl has been broadcast in Canada since its inception on both English and French television networks. In English, the first 12 Super Bowl games were broadcast on CBC television stations and affiliates. The game rotated between CTV (1979, 1981, 1983) and CBC (1980, 1982) before airing on Global and its affiliates in 1984 and 1985. The game briefly returned to CTV in 1986 and then aired on Global from 1987 until 2007. Following a new deal with the NFL, CTV regained the rights to air the Super Bowl in Canada and it has aired on the network since 2008. The game has also been simulcast on CTV 2 (2017–19) and sports cable channel TSN (2016–present).[96][97] In Quebec, the first 20 games aired on French television stations owned by the SRC (the Canadian Broadcasting Company is known in French as the Société Radio-Canada). From 1987 to 1991, the Super Bowl aired on TQS, with the exception of the 1989 game which was only available on NBC via cable. In 1992, 1993, and 1994, the game was broadcast on sports channel RDS before moving to TVA in 1995. In 1996, the game returned to RDS and has aired on the channel since.[96][98]

Viewership for early games was estimated through various surveys conducted by Numeris and/or Nielsen Canada. However, reliable figures are only available since the 1990s when Nielsen began tracking viewership in the province of Ontario in 1991; electronic measurement of the game was not conducted by Numeris nationally until the mid-2000s. Following the introduction of the Portable People Meter (PPM) in Canada in time for the 2010 game, viewership increased significantly compared to the previous decade. In 2014 and 2015, total Canadian viewership equaled or exceeded that of American total viewership, per capita.[99] A controversial decision by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) that banned Canadian networks from simsubbing the Super Bowl in 2017, 2018, and 2019 caused a decline in viewership; the rule was overturned by the Supreme Court of Canada prior to the 2020 game.

Similar to the United States, ad prices have also increased over the years on English networks in Canada. In 1977 and 1978, the cost of a 30-second ad was $2,500 and $3,200 Canadian, respectively.[100] By 1992, the price had increased to $25,000.[101] In 1994 and 1995, the price was $29,000 and $40,000, respectively.[102] By 1998, the price had increased to $45,000.[103] In 2000, the price was $85,000 per 30 seconds—more than a 50% increase over the $55,000 it cost in 1999.[104][105] The ad price was approximately $100,000 in 2003.[106] In 2005, the cost of a 30-second ad was $110,000;[107] it was lowered to $100,000 for the next two games due to a decline in viewership.[108][109] Following the acquisition of Super Bowl broadcasts rights by CTV, the price returned to $110,000 in 2008.[109] It then increased to approximately $117,000 for the 2009 game, before declining slightly for the 2010 game.[110] In 2011, CTV charged about $100,000.[111] By 2012, ads cost close to $130,000 per 30 seconds.[112] Ads cost between $170,000 and $200,000 for the 2015 game, and between $150,000 and $200,000 for the 2020 game.[113][114]

Note: Viewership figure for the 2018 English-language broadcast excludes TSN.
Note: Viewership figure for the 2018 English-language broadcast excludes TSN.
Super Bowl television ratings in Canada showing network(s) broadcast on and average viewership, 1998–present
Super Bowl Date English French
Network(s) Avg. viewers Network Avg. viewers
XXXII January 25, 1998 Global 3,000,000[115] RDS Unknown
XXXIII January 31, 1999 3,399,000[14] Unknown
XXXIV January 30, 2000 4,000,000[116] Unknown
XXXV January 28, 2001 3,000,000[117] Unknown
XXXVI February 3, 2002 3,600,000[38] Unknown
XXXVII January 26, 2003 4,200,000[118] Unknown
XXXVIII February 1, 2004 3,560,000[119] Unknown
XXXIX February 6, 2005 3,130,000[120] Unknown
XL February 5, 2006 4,281,000[121] 702,000[121]
XLI February 4, 2007 3,367,000[122] 816,000[123]
XLII February 3, 2008 CTV 4,234,000[124] 905,000[125]
XLIII February 1, 2009 3,600,000[126] Unknown
XLIV February 7, 2010 6,017,000[127] Unknown
XLV February 6, 2011 6,537,000[128] Unknown
XLVI February 5, 2012 7,280,000[129] 765,000[130]
XLVII February 3, 2013 6,447,000[131] Unknown
XLVIII February 2, 2014 7,318,000[132] Unknown
XLIX February 1, 2015 8,262,000[133] 894,000[134]
50 February 7, 2016 7,372,000[135] 939,000[136]
LI February 5, 2017 CTV
CTV 2
TSN
5,602,000[137] 997,000[138]
LII February 4, 2018 4,470,000[139] 949,000[140]
LIII February 3, 2019 5,523,000[141] 981,000[142]
LIV February 4, 2020 CTV
TSN
9,500,000[143] 1,669,000[144]

1967–2009

According to in-house research conducted by the network, the 1977 game was watched by approximately 3.5 million Canadians on the CBC's English and French television stations.[100] In 1978, Nielsen conducted the first independent ratings survey and found that the 1978 game was watched by 4,495,000 million Canadians, including 550,000 on French television stations.[145][146] In 1979, a Bureau of Broadcast Measurement (BBM) survey found that 4,605,000 million Canadians watched that year's Super Bowl; a separate Nielsen survey measured 4.1 million viewers on English television stations only.[147][148] In 1980, Nielsen found that Super Bowl XV was watched by approximately 3.1 million viewers—a decline of over one million compared to the previous year—though it was the most watched broadcast of the week.[149] The 1981 game was watched by 3.5 million on English television stations according to BBM; a later survey by the organization measured an audience of 4,482,000 viewers across both languages.[150][151] In 1982, Nielsen found that Super Bowl XVI was watched by 3.2 million Canadians.[152] In 1985, the game was watched by 1,649,000 viewers on Global.[153] According to the company's 1986 survey of the game, 4,065,000 Canadians watched Super Bowl XX, including 427,000 in Montreal alone.[154]

In 1996, Super Bowl XXX was watched by 1.7 million viewers in Ontario according to Nielsen. The next year, viewership declined to 1,528,000 but returned to 1.7 million for the 1998 game, which drew approximately 3 million viewers nationwide.[115] In 1999, Super Bowl XXXIII was watched by 3,399,000 viewers—the largest electronically measured audience in the game's Canadian broadcast history.[14] This record would be broken the following year when the 2000 game was watched by 4 million, according to preliminary figures.[155] However, the 2001 game was watched by just over 3 million, including 1,548,000 in Ontario—both of which represented multi-year viewership lows.[155][117] The next year, viewership increased to an average of 3.6 million for the 2002 game, and increased again to 4.2 million for the 2003 game.[156][118] However, viewership would decline for the next two years; the 2004 game was watched by 3.56 million, and 3.13 million watched the game in 2005.[119][120]

In 2006, however, viewership increased. Super Bowl XL drew a record English-language audience of 4,281,000 and a French-language audience of 702,000.[121] The 2007 game drew an audience of 3,397,000 English viewers—down over 800,000 compared to the previous year—but the number of French viewers who watched the game increased by over 100,000 to 816,000.[123][157] The French audience increased again the next year to a preliminary 905,000—a record for broadcaster RDS—and the English audience increased to 4,234,000 and peaked at 5.83 million.[121][124] In 2009, viewership declined; the English broadcast was watched by 3,602,000, while the French broadcast was watched by 691,000.[158]

2010–19

Mexico

In Mexico, Super Bowl LIV averaged 3.7 million viewers in Mexico and a 7.3 rating, with 2.94 for TV Azteca, 2.66 for Televisa, 0.87 for Fox Sports, and 0.83 for ESPN. The event had a total reach of 12 million viewers.[159]

Glossary

  • 18–49 rating – the average percentage of adults age 18–49 in the United States with a television set who were watching the game at any given minute during its broadcast. As of the 2019–20 television season, a 1.0 18–49 rating is equivalent to approximately 1.28 million U.S. adults age 18–49.[160]
  • 18–49 share – the average percentage of adults age 18–49 in the United States with a television set in use who were watching the game at any given minute during its broadcast.[160]
  • average viewers – the average number of viewers who were watching the game at any given minute during its broadcast; the standard ratings measurement metric.[161]
  • household rating – the average percentage of households in the United States with a television set that were watching the game at any given minute during its broadcast. As of the 2019–20 television season, a 1.0 household rating is equivalent to approximately 1.21 million U.S. households.[162]
  • household share – the average percentage of households in the United States with a television set in use that were watching the game at any given minute during its broadcast.[160]
  • total viewers – the number of viewers in the United States who watched at least six minutes of the game during its broadcast (originally at least five minutes);[163] not an industry-standard metric or usually reported outside of special event programming.[54][161]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b At the request of CBS, Nielsen excluded the 34 minute power outage delay from Super Bowl XLVII's ratings.[56][57]

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