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List of Super Bowl champions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Super Bowl is the annual American football game that determines the champion of the National Football League (NFL). The game culminates a season that begins in the previous calendar year, and is the conclusion of the NFL playoffs. The contest is held in an American city, chosen three to four years beforehand,[1] usually at warm-weather sites or domed stadiums.[2] Since January 1971, the winner of the American Football Conference (AFC) Championship Game has faced the winner of the National Football Conference (NFC) Championship Game in the culmination of the NFL playoffs.

The Packers defeated the Chiefs in the first AFL–NFL Championship Game (Super Bowl I).
The Packers defeated the Chiefs in the first AFL–NFL Championship Game (Super Bowl I).

Before the 1970 merger between the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL), the two leagues met in four such contests. The first two were marketed as the "AFL–NFL World Championship Game", but were also casually referred to as "the Super Bowl game" during the television broadcast.[3] Super Bowl III in January 1969 was the first such game that carried the "Super Bowl" moniker in official marketing; the names "Super Bowl I" and "Super Bowl II" were retroactively applied to the first two games.[4] The NFC/NFL leads in Super Bowl wins with 27, while the AFC/AFL has won 26. Twenty franchises, including teams that have relocated to another city, have won the Super Bowl.[5]

The New England Patriots (6–5) and Pittsburgh Steelers (6–2) have won the most Super Bowls with six championships, while the Dallas Cowboys (5–3) and the San Francisco 49ers (5–1) have five wins. New England has the most Super Bowl appearances with eleven, while the Buffalo Bills (0–4) have the most consecutive appearances with four (all losses) from 1990 to 1993. The Miami Dolphins (1971–1973) and New England Patriots (2016–2018) are the only other teams to have at least three consecutive appearances. The Denver Broncos (3–5) and Patriots have each lost a record five Super Bowls. The Minnesota Vikings (0–4) and the Bills have lost four. The record for consecutive wins is two and is shared by seven franchises: the Green Bay Packers (1966–1967), the Miami Dolphins (1972–1973), the Pittsburgh Steelers (1974–1975 and 1978–1979, the only team to accomplish this feat twice and have four wins in six seasons), the San Francisco 49ers (1988–1989), the Dallas Cowboys (1992–1993), the Denver Broncos (1997–1998), and the New England Patriots (2003–2004). Among those, Dallas (1992–1993; 1995) and New England (2001; 2003–2004) are the only teams to win three out of four consecutive Super Bowls. The 1972 Dolphins capped off the only perfect season in NFL history with their victory in Super Bowl VII. The only team with multiple Super Bowl appearances and no losses is the Baltimore Ravens, who in winning Super Bowl XLVII defeated and replaced the 49ers in that position. Four current NFL teams have never appeared in a Super Bowl, including franchise relocations and renaming: the Cleveland Browns, Detroit Lions, Jacksonville Jaguars, and Houston Texans, though both the Browns (1950, 1954, 1955, 1964) and Lions (1935, 1952, 1953, 1957) had won NFL championship games prior to the creation of the Super Bowl.

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Transcription

Hey internet friends. The word “entertainment” can be traced back to old French and Latin with its roots meaning “to hold” and “to keep someone in a certain frame of mind”, and there’s no greater annual entertainment event that captivates the masses quite like the “big game”. Professional football’s annual ritual, the Super Bowl, has transformed from a mere championship game to an economic juggernaut and cultural force, garnering more viewership than any measly presidential debate. Every year, friends and family gather around the television to watch the big game, the most die-hard fans cheering for the team they view as an extension of themselves, and the most luke warm viewers just watching for the commercials. While this one moment a year serves as the the most universal, shared cultural experience across the United States, the masses are, by and large, unaware that it’s not just a football game being played out on America’s greatest stage. That’s why today, we’re going to discuss the dark history of the Super Bowl. The origins of the NFL trace back to 1920 Canton, Ohio, where a group of representatives of professional football teams gathered in the showroom of the Ralph E. Hay’s Motor Company to discuss the establishment of a league which would have its own line-up of teams, set of standards, and an official schedule. At the age of 33, olympian, pro-athlete, and coach Jim Thorpe became the head of the American Professional Football Association, and the association adopted the National Football League title two years later. Sounds like pretty wholesome beginnings, right? Well, let’s take a closer look, shall we? Though the NFL has historically denounced any public affiliation with gambling at the risk of taking the integrity away from the sport itself, the league’s very foundation was built off of illegal and legal gambling proceeds. Charles Bidwill, well-known race track owner and gambler with famous ties to Chicago mobster Al Capone, used the proceeds from horse betting to purchase the Chicago Cardinals (now the Arizona Cardinals). The same tale can be relayed for Art Rooney, who bought the Steelers franchise in 1933. Tim Mara, the founder of the Giants, was a bookie at the time of purchase, and owner of the Cleveland Browns, Arthur McBride, was the former head of the mob gambling news service, otherwise known as the Continental Racing Wire. With the exception of the Cleveland Browns, all of the aforementioned franchises are still owned by the same families. Over the decades, the NFL absorbed the teams of rival leagues, establishing itself as a monopoly over the professional football world—well, until the 1960s, when the American Football League gave the NFL a run for its money. The result? The first Super Bowl. The Super Bowl of 1967 started out as a championship game between both the NFL and AFL, and the term “Super Bowl” was coined by Lamar Hunt, founder of the AFL, who allegedly got the term from his children, who were playing with a bouncy toy called a “super ball”. Again, what a wholesome tale on the surface. Let’s dive a little deeper. Lamar Hunt was the son of Haroldson Layfayette Hunt, a gambler who used his poker winnings to buy the East Texas Oil Fields. His fortune provided him great political influence as he developed what was then considered “extreme conservative political views”. His wealth financed conservative radio talk shows, the political career of Lyndon B. Johnson, as well as an anti-Fidel Castro group who worked in cahoots with the mafia and CIA to oust Castro, and he even set up a right-wing intelligence network with his sons, including Super Bowl Lamar. To top it all off, Haroldson Hunt was eventually accused of funding President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Anyway, the AFL ended up merging with the NFL after several Super Bowls. This was during a time when it was believed that no sport could compete with baseball in the United States, but the lure of escapism spectatorship for an overworked middle class, as well as sports betting for avid fans, was enough to turn a simple sporting event like the Super Bowl into a cultural phenomenon. But soon to follow were accusations of game fixing, and these rumors were only amplified when the public learned about two of the NFL’s top players who were suspended for the 1963 season on accusations of illegal betting and gambling associations. (Though, it should be noted that they both were reinstated a year later and went on to have successful careers, how about that?). Quarterback Joe Namath’s career was cut short when the NFL insisted that Broadway Joe divest himself from a bar he owned in the Upper Eastside that was a favorite of bookies and mob families like the Gambinos. Instead of parting ways with his bar, Broadway Joe decided to retire from football altogether. These historical examples of professional football’s ties to organized crime are really just a taste of the true reality of this cozy relationship. Spanning the decades, there have been numerous instances of franchise owners, coaches, referees, and players all having ties to illegal gambling and organized crime, fueling suspicions of games being rigged. The NFL is, at its core, a business. They’re in the sports entertainment business, and the product they sell is fantasy. Their entertainment consists of gripping tales of the hometown hero, the rise of the underdog, the team who beat the odds--the NFL is aware that die-hard fans view the their respective teams as extensions of themselves, investing much of their free time, energy, and passion into their team, as well as tribal rivalry. So it’s a curious thing that although there are laws in place to prevent outside meddling in professional sports, there are currently no laws in existence that prevent a league, whether it be the NFL, NBA, whatever, from fixing its own contests. It’s their business, their event. By law, the business can, theoretically, rig their own event. And according to the law, the media can absolutely lie to all of us. How’s that for wholesome television programming? The price of a 30-second Super Bowl ad in 1967 was $42,500. Today, the price of a 30-second Super Bowl ad is just north of five million dollars. While some of the most memorable Super Bowl ads include Joe Namath’s Noxzema ad and Coca Cola’s “have a Coke and a smile” commercial, it wasn’t until 1984 (ironically) that super bowl ads became their own genre. That was when Hollywood filmmaker Ridley Scott produced a high-budget television ad to debut Apple’s personal computers during the big game, and the outcome was a 60-second cinematic commercial inspired by George Orwell’s 1984, in which the rebel heroine, running through a society of conformity, launched a big ol’ sledge hammer right at a projection of big brother, only to reveal a white light that introduced Macintosh. The Apple’s 1984 really set the trend for corporations to up their marketing game during the super bowl, which resulted in garnering viewership from individuals who didn’t give a dang about football, they watched the Super Bowl for the sheer entertainment of being sold a product in a clever, entertaining way. And that’s why the power of one’s attention cannot be understated.This sporting event, which was once predominately viewed by men, has in recent years been almost equally viewed by both men and women. And with the change in viewer demographics, there’s also been a change in the narrative of the ads themselves. Super Bowl television ads have shifted from funny, light-hearted, or even meaningful mini-stories, albeit with the underlying message of “give us your money”, to corporations pushing divisive social and political agendas in their short thirty second segments. Not only do these corporations now want spectators to give them their attention and their hard-earned cash, but they want viewers to adopt their paradigm or at the very least, trigger and direct political discussion, earning them all the more publicity along the way when viral outrage rips through social media and Super Bowl viewers debate their co-workers at office on Monday. It’s quite a trick. One that most are not aware of: the corporate marketing techniques that not only prompt subliminal impulses to act on the unconscious, but also prepare and condition individuals to turn against their neighbor on largely manufactured issues, so that which was once united can be divided, redirected, and conquered. Since there’s no other regularly scheduled event seen by so many Americans, we can assume that whatever is relayed during the game, whether it be a political statement by a player, a corporate advertisement promoting social change, or a symbolic message portrayed in the background of the half-time show, it’s not only important, but absolutely calculated and intentional.Prior to the 1990s, the halftime show consisted of marching bands and pigeons and flag routines, but in 1993, the Super Bowl halftime show was forever changed, when the King of Pop, Michael Jackson, took the stage. From then on, stars regarded as demi-gods exclusively performed at half-time shows, with Katy Perry’s performance in 2015 becoming the most watched half-time show at 120 million viewers, rivaled only by Lady Gaga’s 117 million in later years. But still, rarely do people remember those half-time shows. But everyone surely remembers Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson’s sexually-charged wardrobe malfunction, given that the entire United States got up-close and personal with Janet Jackson’s boobie and that curious sunshiney nipple cover. Like I said before, the power of one’s attention cannot be understated. The entertainment of the half-time show boils down to most of the artists lip syncing and playing fake instruments, with a plethora of background dancers and an impressive spectacle of shiny, illuminated displays popping up. But what is the purpose of the half-time show beyond breaking up the game and entertaining the onlookers? To condition individuals to various agendas like the surveillance state through Lady Gaga’s performance, in which twinkling drones formed an American flag in the night sky behind her? To declare whatever occult allegiance through symbolism and provide a peek into an invisible reality, like with Katy Perry’s pawns on the masonic checkerboard? To harvest some sort of energy in the form of shock value and outrage at intentional wardrobe malfunctions? By design, that line of questioning is very much subject to speculation, but what is clear is that half-time shows have become a symbolic link between pop-culture and the modern day equivalence of gladiatorial events. Over the years, very little has changed in the way of professional football’s ties to organized crime--the only thing that’s changed really is the level of interest the general public has shown in professional sports and its televised product. To make matters worse, all the illegal gambling and sports tourism associated with the Super Bowl creates a surplus of cashflow, making the annual ritual the largest event for human trafficking in the United States. So, is the Super Bowl really just speaky-clean, family-friendly fun ? Or is this championship game another engineered event leading to an endless array of bread and circuses? This video is in no way demonizing the spectatorship or enjoyment of professional sports, but what I hope this video has established, beyond the history of the Super Bowl, is awareness of what entertainment actually is. Let me know your thoughts, internet friends. You know I always look forward to your comments. Thank you all so much for watching, subscribing, hitting the notification bell, and supporting my channel on Patreon. Bye!

Contents

Super Bowl Championship (1966–present)

Numbers in parentheses in the table are Super Bowl appearances as of the date of that Super Bowl and are used as follows:

  • Winning team and losing team columns indicate the number of times that team has appeared in a Super Bowl as well as each respective teams' Super Bowl record to date.
  • Venue column indicates number of times that stadium has hosted a Super Bowl.
  • City column indicates number of times that metropolitan area has hosted a Super Bowl.
(1967–1970) (1971–present)
National Football League (NFL) National Football Conference (NFC)
NFL championn
(4, 2–2)
NFC championN
(49, 25–24)
American Football League (AFL) American Football Conference (AFC)
AFL championa
(4, 2–2)
AFC championA
(49, 24–25)
Game Date Winning team Score Losing team Venue City Attendance Ref
I
[note 1]
January 15, 1967 Green Bay Packersn
(1, 1–0)
35–10 Kansas City Chiefsa
(1, 0–1)
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Los Angeles, California[note 2] 61,946 [7]
II
[note 1]
January 14, 1968 Green Bay Packersn
(2, 2–0)
33–14 Oakland Raidersa
(1, 0–1)
Miami Orange Bowl Miami, Florida[note 3] 75,546 [8]
III
[note 1]
January 12, 1969 New York Jetsa
(1, 1–0)
16–7  Baltimore Coltsn
(1, 0–1)
Miami Orange Bowl (2) Miami, Florida (2)[note 3] 75,389 [9]
IV
[note 1]
January 11, 1970 Kansas City Chiefsa
(2, 1–1)
23–7  Minnesota Vikingsn
(1, 0–1)
Tulane Stadium New Orleans, Louisiana 80,562 [10]
V January 17, 1971 Baltimore ColtsA
(2, 1–1)
16–13  Dallas CowboysN
(1, 0–1)
Miami Orange Bowl (3) Miami, Florida (3)[note 3] 79,204 [11]
VI January 16, 1972 Dallas CowboysN
(2, 1–1)
24–3  Miami DolphinsA
(1, 0–1)
Tulane Stadium (2) New Orleans, Louisiana (2) 81,023 [12]
VII January 14, 1973 Miami DolphinsA
(2, 1–1)
14–7  Washington RedskinsN
(1, 0–1)
Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (2) Los Angeles, California (2)[note 2] 90,182 [13]
VIII January 13, 1974 Miami DolphinsA
(3, 2–1)
24–7  Minnesota VikingsN
(2, 0–2)
Rice Stadium[note 4] Houston, Texas 71,882 [14]
IX January 12, 1975 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(1, 1–0)
16–6  Minnesota VikingsN
(3, 0–3)
Tulane Stadium (3) New Orleans, Louisiana (3) 80,997 [15]
X January 18, 1976 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(2, 2–0)
21–17 Dallas CowboysN
(3, 1–2)
Miami Orange Bowl (4) Miami, Florida (4)[note 3] 80,187 [16]
XI January 9, 1977 Oakland RaidersA
(2, 1–1)
32–14 Minnesota VikingsN
(4, 0–4)
Rose Bowl[note 5] Pasadena, California (3)[note 2] 103,438 [17]
XII January 15, 1978 Dallas CowboysN
(4, 2–2)
27–10 Denver BroncosA
(1, 0–1)
Louisiana Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana (4) 76,400 [18]
XIII January 21, 1979 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(3, 3–0)
35–31 Dallas CowboysN
(5, 2–3)
Miami Orange Bowl (5) Miami, Florida (5)[note 3] 79,484 [19]
XIV January 20, 1980 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(4, 4–0)
31–19 Los Angeles RamsN
(1, 0–1)
Rose Bowl (2)[note 5][note 6] Pasadena, California (4)[note 2] 103,985 [20]
XV January 25, 1981 Oakland RaidersA
(3, 2–1)
27–10 Philadelphia EaglesN
(1, 0–1)
Louisiana Superdome (2) New Orleans, Louisiana (5) 76,135 [21]
XVI January 24, 1982 San Francisco 49ersN
(1, 1–0)
26–21 Cincinnati BengalsA
(1, 0–1)
Pontiac Silverdome Pontiac, Michigan[note 7] 81,270 [23]
XVII January 30, 1983 Washington RedskinsN
(2, 1–1)
27–17 Miami DolphinsA
(4, 2–2)
Rose Bowl (3)[note 5] Pasadena, California (5)[note 2] 103,667 [24]
XVIII January 22, 1984 Los Angeles RaidersA
(4, 3–1)
38–9  Washington RedskinsN
(3, 1–2)
Tampa Stadium Tampa, Florida 72,920 [25]
XIX January 20, 1985 San Francisco 49ersN
(2, 2–0)
38–16 Miami DolphinsA
(5, 2–3)
Stanford Stadium[note 8] Stanford, California[note 9] 84,059 [27]
XX January 26, 1986 Chicago BearsN
(1, 1–0)
46–10 New England PatriotsA
(1, 0–1)
Louisiana Superdome (3) New Orleans, Louisiana (6) 73,818 [28]
XXI January 25, 1987 New York GiantsN
(1, 1–0)
39–20 Denver BroncosA
(2, 0–2)
Rose Bowl (4)[note 5] Pasadena, California (6)[note 2] 101,063 [29]
XXII January 31, 1988 Washington RedskinsN
(4, 2–2)
42–10 Denver BroncosA
(3, 0–3)
San Diego–Jack Murphy Stadium[note 10] San Diego, California 73,302 [30]
XXIII January 22, 1989 San Francisco 49ersN
(3, 3–0)
20–16 Cincinnati BengalsA
(2, 0–2)
Joe Robbie Stadium[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (6)[note 3] 75,129 [31]
XXIV January 28, 1990 San Francisco 49ersN
(4, 4–0)
55–10 Denver BroncosA
(4, 0–4)
Louisiana Superdome (4) New Orleans, Louisiana (7) 72,919 [32]
XXV January 27, 1991 New York GiantsN
(2, 2–0)
20–19 Buffalo BillsA
(1, 0–1)
Tampa Stadium (2) Tampa, Florida (2) 73,813 [33]
XXVI January 26, 1992 Washington RedskinsN
(5, 3–2)
37–24 Buffalo BillsA
(2, 0–2)
Metrodome Minneapolis, Minnesota 63,130 [34]
XXVII January 31, 1993 Dallas CowboysN
(6, 3–3)
52–17 Buffalo BillsA
(3, 0–3)
Rose Bowl (5)[note 5] Pasadena, California (7)[note 2] 98,374 [35]
XXVIII January 30, 1994 Dallas CowboysN
(7, 4–3)
30–13 Buffalo BillsA
(4, 0–4)
Georgia Dome Atlanta, Georgia 72,817 [36]
XXIX January 29, 1995 San Francisco 49ersN
(5, 5–0)
49–26 San Diego ChargersA
(1, 0–1)
Joe Robbie Stadium (2)[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (7)[note 3] 74,107 [37]
XXX January 28, 1996 Dallas CowboysN
(8, 5–3)
27–17 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(5, 4–1)
Sun Devil Stadium Tempe, Arizona[note 12] 76,347 [40]
XXXI January 26, 1997 Green Bay PackersN
(3, 3–0)
35–21 New England PatriotsA
(2, 0–2)
Louisiana Superdome (5) New Orleans, Louisiana (8) 72,301 [41]
XXXII January 25, 1998 Denver BroncosA
(5, 1–4)
31–24 Green Bay PackersN
(4, 3–1)
Qualcomm Stadium (2)[note 10] San Diego, California (2) 68,912 [42]
XXXIII January 31, 1999 Denver BroncosA
(6, 2–4)
34–19 Atlanta FalconsN
(1, 0–1)
Pro Player Stadium (3)[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (8)[note 3] 74,803 [43]
XXXIV January 30, 2000 St. Louis RamsN
(2, 1–1)
23–16 Tennessee TitansA
(1, 0–1)
Georgia Dome (2) Atlanta, Georgia (2) 72,625 [44]
XXXV January 28, 2001 Baltimore RavensA
(1, 1–0)
34–7  New York GiantsN
(3, 2–1)
Raymond James Stadium Tampa, Florida (3) 71,921 [45]
XXXVI February 3, 2002 New England PatriotsA
(3, 1–2)
20–17 St. Louis RamsN
(3, 1–2)
Louisiana Superdome (6) New Orleans, Louisiana (9) 72,922 [46]
XXXVII January 26, 2003 Tampa Bay BuccaneersN
(1, 1–0)
48–21 Oakland RaidersA
(5, 3–2)
Qualcomm Stadium (3)[note 10] San Diego, California (3) 67,603 [47]
XXXVIII February 1, 2004 New England PatriotsA
(4, 2–2)
32–29 Carolina PanthersN
(1, 0–1)
Reliant Stadium[note 13] Houston, Texas (2) 71,525 [48]
XXXIX February 6, 2005 New England PatriotsA
(5, 3–2)
24–21 Philadelphia EaglesN
(2, 0–2)
Alltel Stadium Jacksonville, Florida 78,125 [49]
XL February 5, 2006 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(6, 5–1)
21–10 Seattle SeahawksN
(1, 0–1)
Ford Field Detroit, Michigan (2)[note 7] 68,206 [50]
XLI February 4, 2007 Indianapolis ColtsA
(3, 2–1)
29–17 Chicago BearsN
(2, 1–1)
Dolphin Stadium (4)[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (9)[note 3] 74,512 [51]
XLII February 3, 2008 New York GiantsN
(4, 3–1)
17–14 New England PatriotsA
(6, 3–3)
University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale, Arizona (2)[note 12] 71,101 [52]
XLIII February 1, 2009 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(7, 6–1)
27–23 Arizona CardinalsN
(1, 0–1)
Raymond James Stadium (2) Tampa, Florida (4) 70,774 [53]
XLIV February 7, 2010 New Orleans SaintsN
(1, 1–0)
31–17 Indianapolis ColtsA
(4, 2–2)
Sun Life Stadium (5)[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (10)[note 3] 74,059 [54]
XLV February 6, 2011 Green Bay PackersN
(5, 4–1)
31–25 Pittsburgh SteelersA
(8, 6–2)
Cowboys Stadium Arlington, Texas 103,219 [55]
XLVI February 5, 2012 New York GiantsN
(5, 4–1)
21–17 New England PatriotsA
(7, 3–4)
Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis, Indiana 68,658 [56][57]
XLVII February 3, 2013 Baltimore RavensA
(2, 2–0)
34–31 San Francisco 49ersN
(6, 5–1)
Mercedes-Benz Superdome (7) New Orleans, Louisiana (10) 71,024 [56][58]
XLVIII February 2, 2014 Seattle SeahawksN
(2, 1–1)
43–8 Denver BroncosA
(7, 2–5)
MetLife Stadium East Rutherford, New Jersey 82,529 [59]
XLIX February 1, 2015 New England PatriotsA
(8, 4–4)
28–24 Seattle SeahawksN
(3, 1–2)
University of Phoenix Stadium (2) Glendale, Arizona (3)[note 12] 70,288 [60][61]
50
[note 14]
February 7, 2016 Denver BroncosA
(8, 3–5)
24–10 Carolina PanthersN
(2, 0–2)
Levi's Stadium Santa Clara, California (2)[note 9] 71,088 [61][62][63]
LI February 5, 2017 New England PatriotsA
(9, 5–4)
34–28 (OT) Atlanta FalconsN
(2, 0–2)
NRG Stadium (2)[note 13] Houston, Texas (3) 70,807 [61][62][63]
LII February 4, 2018 Philadelphia EaglesN
(3, 1–2)
41–33 New England PatriotsA
(10, 5–5)
U.S. Bank Stadium Minneapolis, Minnesota (2) 67,612 [64][65]
LIII February 3, 2019 New England PatriotsA
(11, 6–5)
13–3 Los Angeles RamsN
(4, 1–3)
Mercedes-Benz Stadium Atlanta, Georgia (3) 70,081 [66][67]
LIV February 2, 2020
[note 15]
X 2020 To be determined (TBD) Hard Rock Stadium (6)[note 11] Miami Gardens, Florida (11)[note 3] TBD [66][67]
LV February 7, 2021
[note 15]
X 2021 To be determined Raymond James Stadium (3) Tampa, Florida (5) TBD [66][67]
LVI February 6, 2022
[note 15]
X 2022 To be determined Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park Inglewood, California (8)[note 2] TBD [66][67]
LVII February 5, 2023
[note 15]
X 2023 To be determined State Farm Stadium (3) Glendale, Arizona (4)[note 12] TBD [68]
LVIII February 4, 2024
[note 15]
X 2024 To be determined Mercedes-Benz Superdome (8) New Orleans, Louisiana (11) TBD [68]
Game Date Winning team Score Losing team Venue City Attendance Ref

Consecutive winners

The Steelers defeated the Rams in Super Bowl XIV to win an unprecedented four championships in six years.
The Steelers defeated the Rams in Super Bowl XIV to win an unprecedented four championships in six years.

Seven franchises have won consecutive Super Bowls, one of which (Pittsburgh) has accomplished it twice:

  • Green Bay Packers (Super Bowls I and II)
  • Miami Dolphins (VII and VIII)
  • Pittsburgh Steelers (twice: IX and X; XIII and XIV)
  • San Francisco 49ers (XXIII and XXIV)
  • Dallas Cowboys (XXVII and XXVIII)
  • Denver Broncos (XXXII and XXXIII)
  • New England Patriots (XXXVIII and XXXIX)

No franchise has yet won three Super Bowls in a row, although several have come close:

  • The Green Bay Packers won the first two Super Bowls, and also won the NFL championship the preceding year.
  • The Miami Dolphins appeared in three consecutive Super Bowls (VI, VII, and VIII), winning the last two.
  • The Pittsburgh Steelers won two consecutive Super Bowls (IX and X); the following season they were eliminated in the AFC championship game by the eventual Super Bowl champion Oakland Raiders. They also won two more consecutive Super Bowls (XIII and XIV) for four wins in six seasons.
  • The San Francisco 49ers won two consecutive Super Bowls (XXIII and XXIV); the following season they were eliminated in the NFC championship by the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants.
  • The Dallas Cowboys won two consecutive Super Bowls (XXVII and XXVIII); the following season they were eliminated in the NFC championship game by the eventual champion San Francisco 49ers. The Cowboys won Super Bowl XXX the following year for three wins in four seasons.
  • The New England Patriots won Super Bowl XXXVI, which was two years before their consecutive wins in XXXVIII and XXXIX, for three wins in four seasons. They did not make the playoffs in the intervening season (XXXVII). The Patriots also won Super Bowls XLIX, LI, and LIII for three wins in five seasons. In the two intervening seasons they were eliminated in the AFC championship game by the eventual Super Bowl 50 champion Denver Broncos and lost to the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl LII two years later. Like Miami, they also appeared in three consecutive Super Bowls (LI, LII, and LIII).

Consecutive losers

Three franchises have lost consecutive Super Bowls:

  • Buffalo Bills (4) (Super Bowls XXV, XXVI, XXVII, and XXVIII) – The only team to appear in four straight Super Bowls, let alone lose in all four appearances.
  • Minnesota Vikings (2) (VIII and IX) – They also lost Super Bowl XI, and were knocked out of the playoffs for Super Bowl X by the eventual losers the Dallas Cowboys for three losses in four seasons.
  • Denver Broncos (2) (XXI and XXII) – They also lost Super Bowl XXIV, but did not even make the playoffs for Super Bowl XXIII for three losses in four seasons.

Consecutive appearances

The Buffalo Bills have the most consecutive appearances with four (all losses) from 1990 to 1993. The Miami Dolphins (1971–1973) and New England Patriots (2016–2018) are the only other teams to have at least three consecutive appearances. Including those three, eleven teams have at least two consecutive appearances. The Dallas Cowboys are the only team with three separate streaks (1970–1971, 1977–1978, and 1992–1993). The Green Bay Packers, Pittsburgh Steelers, Denver Broncos, and Patriots have each had two separate consecutive appearances. The full listing of teams with consecutive appearances is below in order of first occurrence:

  • Green Bay Packers (twice: Super Bowls I and II; XXXI and XXXII)
  • Dallas Cowboys (thrice: V and VI; XII and XIII; XXVII and XXVIII)
  • Miami Dolphins (VI, VII, and VIII)
  • Minnesota Vikings (VIII and IX)
  • Pittsburgh Steelers (twice: IX and X; XIII and XIV)
  • Washington Redskins (XVII and XVII)
  • Denver Broncos (twice: XXI and XXII; XXXII and XXXIII)
  • San Francisco 49ers (XXIII and XXIV)
  • Buffalo Bills (XXV, XXVI, XXVII, and XXVIII)
  • New England Patriots (twice: XXXVIII and XXXIX; LI, LII, and LIII)
  • Seattle Seahawks (XLVIII and XLIX)

Super Bowl appearances by team

NFLn/NFCN teams (27–26) AFLa/AFCA teams (26–27)
NFLn/AFCA team (0–1 as part of the NFL, 2–1 as part of the AFC)[note 16]

In the sortable table below, teams are ordered first by number of appearances, then by number of wins, and finally by number of years since last appearing in a Super Bowl. In the "Seasons" column, bold years indicate winning seasons, and italic years indicate games not yet completed.

Appearances Team Wins Losses Winning
percentage
Seasons Years since
last app.
Years since
last win
11 New England PatriotsA 6 5 .545 1985,A 1996,A 2001,A 2003,A 2004,A 2007,A 2011,A 2014,A 2016,A 2017,A 2018A 0 0
8 Pittsburgh SteelersA[note 16] 6 2 .750 1974,A 1975,A 1978,A 1979,A 1995,A 2005,A 2008,A 2010A 8 10
8 Dallas CowboysN 5 3 .625 1970,N 1971,N 1975,N 1977,N 1978,N 1992,N 1993,N 1995N 23 23
8 Denver BroncosA 3 5 .375 1977,A 1986,A 1987,A 1989,A 1997,A 1998,A 2013,A 2015A 3 3
6 San Francisco 49ersN 5 1 .833 1981,N 1984,N 1988,N 1989,N 1994N, 2012N 6 24
5 Green Bay PackersnN 4 1 .800 1966,n 1967,n 1996,N 1997,N 2010N 8 8
5 New York GiantsN 4 1 .800 1986,N 1990,N 2000,N 2007,N 2011N 7 7
5 Washington RedskinsN 3 2 .600 1972,N 1982,N 1983,N 1987,N 1991N 27 27
5 Los Angeles/Oakland RaidersaA 3 2 .600 1967,a 1976,A 1980,A 1983,A 2002A 16 35
5 Miami DolphinsA 2 3 .400 1971,A 1972,A 1973,A 1982,A 1984A 34 45
4 Baltimore/Indianapolis ColtsnA[note 16] 2 2 .500 1968,n 1970,A 2006,A 2009A 9 12
4 St. Louis/Los Angeles RamsN 1 3 .250 1979,N 1999,N 2001,N 2018N 0 19
4 Minnesota VikingsnN 0 4 .000 1969,n 1973,N 1974,N 1976N 42 53
4 Buffalo BillsA 0 4 .000 1990,A 1991,A 1992,A 1993A 25 53
3 Seattle SeahawksN 1 2 .333 2005,N 2013,N 2014N 4 5
3 Philadelphia EaglesN 1 2 .333 1980,N 2004,N 2017N 1 1
2 Baltimore RavensA[note 17] 2 0 1.000 2000,A 2012A 6 6
2 Kansas City ChiefsaA 1 1 .500 1966,a 1969a 49 49
2 Chicago BearsN 1 1 .500 1985,N 2006N 12 33
2 Cincinnati BengalsA 0 2 .000 1981,A 1988A 30 53
2 Carolina PanthersN 0 2 .000 2003,N 2015N 3 23
[note 18]
2 Atlanta FalconsN 0 2 .000 1998,N 2016N 2 53
1 New York JetsaA 1 0 1.000 1968a 50 50
1 Tampa Bay BuccaneersN 1 0 1.000 2002N 16 16
1 New Orleans SaintsN 1 0 1.000 2009N 9 9
1 San Diego/Los Angeles ChargersA 0 1 .000 1994A 24 53
1 Houston Oilers/Tennessee TitansA 0 1 .000 1999A 19 53
1 St. Louis/Arizona CardinalsN 0 1 .000 2008N 10 53
0 Cleveland BrownsA[note 16][note 17] 0 0 none 53 53
0 Detroit LionsN 0 0 none 53 53
0 Jacksonville JaguarsA 0 0 none 23
[note 18]
23
[note 18]
0 Houston TexansA 0 0 none 16
[note 19]
16
[note 19]
Appearances Team Wins Losses Winning
percentage
Seasons Years since
last app.
Years since
last win
The Patriots played their first championship game in Super Bowl XX (pictured) where they lost to the Bears. This is the most recent Super Bowl where both teams had their first Super Bowl appearance. The Patriots hold the record for most Super Bowl appearances (11) and are tied for both most wins (6, tied with the Steelers) and most losses (5, tied with the Broncos).
The Patriots played their first championship game in Super Bowl XX (pictured) where they lost to the Bears. This is the most recent Super Bowl where both teams had their first Super Bowl appearance. The Patriots hold the record for most Super Bowl appearances (11) and are tied for both most wins (6, tied with the Steelers) and most losses (5, tied with the Broncos).

Teams with no Super Bowl appearances

Four current teams have never reached the Super Bowl. Two of them held NFL league championships prior to Super Bowl I in the 1966 NFL season:

In addition, Detroit, Houston, and Jacksonville have hosted Super Bowls, making Cleveland the only current NFL city that has neither hosted nor had its team play in a Super Bowl.

Teams with long Super Bowl droughts

The Jets' last championship appearance was their victory over the Colts in Super Bowl III.
The Jets' last championship appearance was their victory over the Colts in Super Bowl III.

Although Jacksonville and Houston have never appeared in a Super Bowl, there are teams whose most recent Super Bowl appearance was before Jacksonville and Houston joined the NFL (1995 and 2002, respectively), resulting in similar or longer Super Bowl droughts for the following twelve teams.

Two of these teams have not appeared in the Super Bowl since before the AFL–NFL merger in 1970:[74]

However, the Jets and the Chiefs are the only non-NFL teams to win the Super Bowl, both being members of the now-defunct AFL at the time.

The most recent Super Bowl appearance for the following teams was after the AFL–NFL merger, but prior to the 2003 regular season:

Teams with Super Bowl appearances but no victories

Eight teams have appeared in the Super Bowl without ever winning. In descending order of number of appearances, they are:

  • Minnesota Vikings (4), appeared in Super Bowls IV, VIII, IX, and XI. They won the NFL Championship Game in 1969, the last year before the AFL–NFL merger, but failed to win the subsequent Super Bowl. An NFL expansion team in 1961, they have no pre-Super Bowl league championships.
  • Buffalo Bills (4), appeared in Super Bowls XXV, XXVI, XXVII, and XXVIII. Their second and last AFL championship was in 1965, the season before the first Super Bowl.
  • Cincinnati Bengals (2), appeared in Super Bowls XVI and XXIII. An AFL expansion team in 1968, they have no pre-Super Bowl league championships.
  • Atlanta Falcons (2), appeared in Super Bowls XXXIII and LI. An expansion team in 1966, they have no pre-Super Bowl league championships.
  • Carolina Panthers (2), appeared in Super Bowls XXXVIII and 50. A post-merger expansion team, their first season was in 1995.
  • Arizona Cardinals (1), appeared in Super Bowl XLIII. Their last championship was in 1947 as the Chicago Cardinals.
  • Los Angeles Chargers (1), appeared in Super Bowl XXIX as the San Diego Chargers. Their only AFL championship was in 1963.
  • Tennessee Titans (1), appeared in Super Bowl XXXIV. They won the first two AFL Championships in 1960 and 1961 as the Houston Oilers.

Super Bowl rematches

The 49ers and the Bengals, who faced off in Super Bowl XVI (pictured), would play each other again in Super Bowl XXIII.
The 49ers and the Bengals, who faced off in Super Bowl XVI (pictured), would play each other again in Super Bowl XXIII.

The following teams have faced each other more than once in the Super Bowl:

  • Dallas Cowboys and Pittsburgh Steelers (3) – Super Bowls X and XIII were won by Pittsburgh, and Super Bowl XXX was won by Dallas. See also Cowboys–Steelers rivalry.
  • Miami Dolphins and Washington Redskins (2) – Super Bowl VII was won by Miami, and Super Bowl XVII was won by Washington.
  • Cincinnati Bengals and San Francisco 49ers (2) – Super Bowls XVI and XXIII were both won by San Francisco.
  • Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys (2) – Super Bowls XXVII and XXVIII, the only rematch in consecutive seasons, were both won by Dallas.
  • New England Patriots and New York Giants (2) – Super Bowls XLII and XLVI were both won by New York.
  • New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles (2) – Super Bowl XXXIX was won by New England, Super Bowl LII was won by Philadelphia.
  • New England Patriots and St. Louis/Los Angeles Rams (2) – Super Bowls XXXVI and LIII were both won by New England.

The New York Jets and Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts (Super Bowl III) are the only pair of Super Bowl participants that cannot have a rematch under the current alignment, since the Colts moved from the NFL to the AFC as part of the AFL–NFL merger.[note 16]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d From 1966 to 1969, the first four Super Bowls were "World Championship" games played between two independent professional football leagues, AFL and NFL, and when the league merged in 1970 the Super Bowl became the NFL Championship Game.[4]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Inglewood are all located in the Greater Los Angeles Area.[6]
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k The Miami Orange Bowl was in Miami proper. Hard Rock Stadium, also in Miami-Dade County, opened in an unincorporated area with a Miami address; the area was incorporated as Miami Gardens in 2003.
  4. ^ Rice Stadium was not a home stadium to any NFL team at the time; the Houston Oilers had played there previously, but moved to the Astrodome several years prior to Super Bowl VIII.
  5. ^ a b c d e The Rose Bowl is not a home stadium to any NFL team.
  6. ^ Despite the Los Angeles Rams and Rose Bowl both being in the Greater Los Angeles Area, the Rams' home stadium at the time was Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
  7. ^ a b Pontiac, Michigan, is a suburb of Detroit.[22]
  8. ^ Despite the San Francisco 49ers being in the same combined statistical area as Stanford Stadium, the venue is not a home stadium to any NFL team. At the time, the 49ers played at Candlestick Park.
  9. ^ a b Both Stanford and Santa Clara are part of the San Francisco Bay Area Combined Statistical Area.[26]
  10. ^ a b c SDCCU Stadium was originally known as San Diego Stadium, San Diego–Jack Murphy Stadium, and Qualcomm Stadium.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Hard Rock Stadium has also been variously known over the years as Joe Robbie Stadium, Pro Player Park, Pro Player Stadium, Dolphins Stadium (with a plural "s"), Dolphin Stadium (with no "s"), Land Shark Stadium, and Sun Life Stadium.
  12. ^ a b c d Both Tempe and Glendale are suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona.[38][39]
  13. ^ a b NRG Stadium was originally known as Reliant Stadium.
  14. ^ Unlike other Super Bowls, Super Bowl 50's official name, as designated by the NFL, uses the Arabic numeral "50" instead of the Roman numeral "L".
  15. ^ a b c d e Dates are tentative, pending possible future changes to the NFL calendar.
  16. ^ a b c d e Three NFL franchises, the Colts, Steelers, and Browns, were placed in the newly-formed AFC, joining the ten extant AFL franchises, when the two leagues merged in 1970. The Colts are the only team to have played in the Super Bowl for both the "National" and "American" sides.
  17. ^ a b Although the 1995 Cleveland Browns became the 1996 Baltimore Ravens, the Browns' name, brand and history remained in Cleveland and was continued by the 1999 Cleveland Browns; the Ravens, for historical purposes, are considered a separate franchise.
  18. ^ a b c The Panthers and Jaguars both joined the league in 1995.
  19. ^ a b The Texans joined the league in 2002.

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External links

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