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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

One-thousand yen
Japan
Value1000 Japanese yen
EdgeReeded
Composition.999 Silver
Years of minting1964 (First issue)
2002–present[a]
Catalog number-
Obverse
DesignVaries by year
Reverse
DesignVaries by year

The 1000 yen coin is a denomination of the Japanese yen. This denomination is only used for the issue of commemorative silver coins struck by the Japan Mint.

History

The first 1000 yen coin was issued in 1964 to commemorate the Tokyo Olympics. Since then, the Japan Mint has issued various 1000 yen coins commemorating various subjects and events of Japan's history. The recent 1000 yen commemorative coins now have color applied to parts of the coin's design.

List of commemoratives

Early issues (1964–2007)

Image Japanese date Gregorian date Mintage Reason
1000yen-S39Olympic.jpg
三十九 (39)
Shōwa[b]
1964 15,000,000 1964 Summer Olympics[1]
FIFA2002-1000yen.jpg
十四 (14)
Heisei[c]
2002 100,000 2002 FIFA World Cup[2]
N/A 十五 (15) 2003 50,000 2003 Asian Winter Games[3]
Amamifikki50nen-1000yen.jpg
十五 (15) 2003 50,000 50th anniversary of the restoration of the Amami Islands to Japan[4]
Aichi-Expo2005-1000yen.jpg
十六 (16) 2004 70,000 The EXPO 2005 AICHI JAPAN[5]
N/A 十八 (18) 2006 70,000 50th Anniversary of Japan's Accession to the United Nations[6]
N/A 十九 (19) 2007 80,000 International Skills Festival for All, Japan 2007[7]

47 Prefectures Coin Program (2008–2016)

Starting in 2008, a program similar to the American 50 State Quarters was put into place which honors all 47 of Japan's prefectures. This was done by celebrating the 60th Anniversary of Enforcement of the Local Autonomy Law in the form of 47 different commemorative coins (designs on obverse side). This program ran until 2016, concluding with the final issues for Tokyo and Fukushima. All 1,000 yen coins were minted in silver, and have a fixed mintage of 100,000 per issue. Many of the designs are cultural in nature and depict elements such as shrines, flora/fauna, and historical figures.
Various obverse designs have been used for the different prefectures (Hokkaido shown here)
Various obverse designs have been used for the different prefectures (Hokkaido shown here)
Reverse design for the Local Autonomy Law series
Reverse design for the Local Autonomy Law series
Japanese date Gregorian date Prefecture[8] Elements depicted
二十 (20) 2008 Hokkaido Lake Tōya and Red-crowned cranes[9]
Kyoto Scene 3 from Chapter 49 of The Tale of Genji[10]
Shimane Otoriosame-Chogin and Peony Flowers[11]
二十一 (21) 2009 Nagano The Japanese Alps and Kamikōchi[12]
Niigata Japanese Crested Ibis and Sado Island[13]
Ibaraki H-II (H2) launch vehicle and Mt. Tsukuba[14]
Nara Daigokuden Seiden, Cherry blossoms and Kemari[15]
二十二 (22) 2010 Kochi Sakamoto Ryōma and Katsurahama beach[16]
Gifu Ukai (cormorant fishing) on the Nagara River[17]
Fukui Dinosaur and Tōjinbō[18]
Aichi Kinshachi[d], Rabbitear Iris and Atsumi Peninsula[19]
Aomori Nebuta, and Neputa festivals with apples at top[20]
Saga Ōkuma Shigenobu with Imari-Arita Ware[21]
二十三 (23) 2011 Toyama Tateyama Mountain Range seen from Amaharashi Coast[22]
Tottori Tottori Sand Dunes, and Sanin Kaigan National Park[23]
Kumamoto Mount Aso[24]
Shiga Lake Biwa, Grebe family, and Ukimidō Temple[25]
Iwate Chūson-ji Konjiki-dō, Chūson-ji Lotus and Pure Land garden of Mōtsū-ji[26]
Akita Nobu Shirase and Namahage[27]
二十四 (24) 2012 Okinawa Shuri Castle and Kumi Odori[28]
Kanagawa Tsurugaoka Hachimangū shrine and Yabusame[29]
Miyazaki Prefectural Government - Main Building, and Takachiho Yokagura[30]
Tochigi Gate (Yōmei–mon) of Nikkō Tōshō-gū shrine[31]
Oita Usa Jingū shrine and Futabayama Sadaji[32]
Hyogo Oriental stork with Himeji Castle in the background[33]
二十五 (25) 2013 Miyagi Date Masamune and Keichō Embassy to Europe[34]
Hiroshima Itsukushima Shintō Shrine, Bugaku and Japanese Red Maple leaves[35]
Gunma Female worker at the Tomioka Silk Mill[36]
Okayama Okayama Kōraku-en Garden and Momotarō[37]
Shizuoka Mt. Fuji as depicted in one of Yokoyama Taikan's works (Ultramarine)[38]
Yamanashi Mt. Fuji, Chūō Shinkansen test track, and grapes[39]
Kagoshima Jōmon Sugi cedar tree, Mt. Nagatadake, and Rhododendron flowers[40]
二十六 (26) 2014 Ehime Dōgo Onsen (main building) and mikan oranges[41]
Yamagata Mogami River and cherries[42]
Mie Isuzu River, and Uji Bridge from the Ise Grand Shrine[43]
Kawaga Ritsurin Garden[44]
Saitama Shibusawa Eiichi and the Time Bell Tower[45]
Ishikawa Yukitsuri protecting trees from snow at Kenroku-en garden, and Kotoji-tōrō[46]
二十七 (27) 2015 Yamaguchi Kintai Bridge and Akiyoshidai plateau[47]
Tokushima Naruto whirlpools, Awa Dance Festival, and Sudachi blossoms[48]
Fukuoka Okinoshima Island, Munakata Taisha grand shrine, and a gold ring[49][e]
Wakayama Danjo Garan temple complex on Mt. Kōya[50]
Osaka Osaka Castle and Bunraku puppet[51]
Nagasaki Oura Cathedral and Camellias[52]
Chiba Tokyo Bay Aqua-Line and Canola flowers (Nanohana)[53]
二十八 (28) 2016 Fukushima Hideyo Noguchi, Mt. Bandai and Lake Inawashiro[54]
Tokyo Tokyo Tower, Rainbow Bridge and seagulls[55]

Commemoratives (2012–present)

The following include commemorative issues that were released concurrently with the 47 Prefectures Coin Program, as well as those released up to present. Seven issues ran concurrently with the program, including a series that was launched in 2015 as a response to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Later issues include coins being released for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Image Japanese date Gregorian date Mintage Reason
N/A 二十四 (24) 2012 50,000 67th Annual Meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group[56][57]
N/A 二十六 (26) 2014 100,000 50th Anniversary of the opening of the Shinkansen[58]
N/A 二十七 (27) 2015 33,286[f] The Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project: 1st Series[59][60]
N/A 二十七 (27) 2015 31,575[f] The Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project: 2nd Series[61]
N/A 二十七 (27) 2015 35,086[f] The Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project: 3rd Series[62]
N/A 二十七 (27) 2015 34,184[f] The Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project: 4th Series[63]
N/A 二十八 (28) 2016 50,000 The Olympic and Paralympic Handover (Rio de Janeiro to Tokyo)[64][65]
N/A 二十九 (29) 2017 N/A 2017 Asian Winter Games[66]
N/A 三十 (30) 2018 N/A 50th Anniversary of the return of the Ogasawara Islands[67]
N/A 三十 (30) 2018 100,000 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics and 2020 Tokyo Summer Paralympics (Series 1)[68]
N/A 三十 (30) 2018 N/A 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Period (Early Meiji period train station)[69]
N/A 三十一 (31)[g] 2019 TBD 2019 Rugby World Cup[70]
N/A 三十一 (31)[g] 2019 TBD 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics and 2020 Tokyo Summer Paralympics (Series 2)[71]

Notes

  1. ^ Non consecutive
  2. ^ 39th year of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito)'s reign, Emperor Heisei (Akihito) was not crowned emperor until 1989
  3. ^ 14th year of Emperor Heisei (Akihito)'s reign
  4. ^ Kinshachi are mythical golden carp-like creatures found on shrines in Japan.
  5. ^ The gold ring depicted is an artifact that was found on Okinoshima Island
  6. ^ a b c d These figures represent the number of coins sold in Japan
  7. ^ a b Subject to new imperial era; Year 1 of Reiwa period

References

  1. ^ "1964 Summer Olympics". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  2. ^ "2002 FIFA World Cup". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  3. ^ "2003 Asian Winter Games". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  4. ^ "50th anniversary of the restoration of the Amami Islands to Japan". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  5. ^ "The EXPO 2005 AICHI JAPAN". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  6. ^ "50th Anniversary of Japan's Accession to the United Nations". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  7. ^ "International Skills Festival for All, Japan 2007". Japan Mint. Archived from the original on January 6, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  8. ^ "Japan 47 Prefectures Coin Program". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 5, 2019.
  9. ^ "Summary of Hokkaido Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  10. ^ "Summary of Kyoto Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  11. ^ "Summary of Shimane Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  12. ^ "Summary of Nagano Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  13. ^ "Summary of Niigata Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  14. ^ "Summary of Ibaraki Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  15. ^ "Summary of Nara Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  16. ^ "Summary of Kōchi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  17. ^ "Summary of Gifu Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  18. ^ "Summary of Fukui Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  19. ^ "Summary of Aichi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  20. ^ "Summary of Aomori Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  21. ^ "Summary of Saga Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  22. ^ "Summary of Toyama Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  23. ^ "Summary of Tottori Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  24. ^ "Summary of Kumamoto Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  25. ^ "Summary of Shiga Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  26. ^ "Summary of Iwate Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  27. ^ "Summary of Akita Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  28. ^ "Summary of Okinawa Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  29. ^ "Summary of Kanagawa Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  30. ^ "Summary of Miyazaki Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  31. ^ "Summary of Tochigi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  32. ^ "Summary of Ōita Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  33. ^ "Summary of Hyōgo Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  34. ^ "Summary of Miyagi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  35. ^ "Summary of Hiroshima Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  36. ^ "Summary of Gunma Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  37. ^ "Summary of Okayama Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  38. ^ "Summary of Shizuoka Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  39. ^ "Summary of Yamanashi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  40. ^ "Summary of Kagoshima Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  41. ^ "Summary of Ehime Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  42. ^ "Summary of Yamagata Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  43. ^ "Summary of Mie Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  44. ^ "Summary of Kagawa Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  45. ^ "Summary of Saitama Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  46. ^ "Summary of Ishikawa Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  47. ^ "Summary of Yamaguchi Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  48. ^ "Summary of Tokushima Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  49. ^ "Summary of Fukuoka Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  50. ^ "Summary of Wakayama Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  51. ^ "Summary of Osaka Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  52. ^ "Summary of Nagasaki Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  53. ^ "Summary of Chiba Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  54. ^ "Summary of Fukushima Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  55. ^ "Summary of Tokyo Prefecture". Japan Mint. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  56. ^ [1] Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2013-01-21.
  57. ^ [2] Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2013-01-21.
  58. ^ [3] Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2014-05-15.
  59. ^ A press release for the issue of commemorative coins for the Great East Japan Reconstruction Project Archived 2012-12-10 at the Wayback Machine Japan Mint. Retrieved 2012-07-22.
  60. ^ Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project (1st Series) Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2016-04-14.
  61. ^ Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project (2nd Series) Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2016-04-14.
  62. ^ Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project (3rd Series) Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2016-04-14.
  63. ^ Great East Japan Earthquake Reconstruction Project (4th Series) Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2016-04-14.
  64. ^ New Japanese Silver Coin Celebrates Olympic Handover to Tokyo in 2020 Coin Update (news.coinupdate.com). August 25, 2016. Retrieved on 2016-08-29.
  65. ^ Designs of The Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games Commemorative Coin Program (The Handover from the Rio 2016 to the Tokyo 2020) The Ministry of Finance of Japan (www.mof.go.jp). August 24, 2016. Retrieved on 2016-09-05.
  66. ^ The 8th Asian Games Silver coin Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2018-01-20.
  67. ^ The 50th Anniversary of the return of the Ogasawara Islands Japan Mint. Retrieved on 2018-01-020.
  68. ^ Designs of The Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Commemorative Coin Program (First Issue) The Ministry of Finance of Japan (www.mof.go.jp). Retrieved on 2018-03-03.
  69. ^ Commemorative Coin for the MEIJI150th Ministry of Finance, Japan (www.mof.go.jp). Retrieved on 2018-08-08.
  70. ^ The 2019 Rugby World Cup 1,000 yen commemorative coin Ministry of Finance, Japan (www.mof.go.jp). Retrieved on 2018-12-28.
  71. ^ Designs of The Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Commemorative Coin Program (Second Issue) The Ministry of Finance of Japan (www.mof.go.jp). Retrieved on 2019-01-10.

External links

This page was last edited on 10 April 2019, at 03:27
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