To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SES-1
NamesAMC-1R
AMC-4R
OS-1
Mission typeCommunications
OperatorSES Americom / SES S.A.
COSPAR ID2010-016A
SATCAT no.36516
Websitehttps://www.ses.com/
Mission duration15 years (planned)
10 years, 11 months, 18 days (elapsed)
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftOS-1
Spacecraft typeGEOStar-2
BusStar-2.4
ManufacturerOrbital Sciences Corporation
Launch mass2,561 kg (5,646 lb)
Power5 kW
Start of mission
Launch date24 April 2010, 11:19:00 UTC
RocketProton-M / Briz-M
Launch siteBaikonur, Site 200/39
ContractorKhrunichev State Research and Production Space Center
Entered serviceJune 2010
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit
RegimeGeostationary orbit
Longitude101° West
Transponders
Band48 transponders:
24 C-band
24 Ku-band
Bandwidth36 MHz
Coverage areaCanada, United States, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America
SES-2 →
 

SES-1 is a geostationary communications satellite which is operated by SES World Skies, then by SES S.A..

History

It was originally ordered by SES Americom as a ground spare for AMC-5R, however in April 2008 a decision was made to launch it, and it was named AMC-1R. It was subsequently renamed AMC-4R, and finally SES-1 after SES Americom merged with SES New Skies to form SES World Skies.[1] It was the third SES World Skies satellite to be launched following the merger, but the first to carry the new SES designation.[2] SES-1 operates in geostationary orbit, and is intended to be located at a longitude of 101° West, where it will replace the AMC-2 and AMC-4 satellites, and be used broadcast high-definition television to very small aperture terminals in the United States.[3]

Spacecraft

SES-1 was built by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), and is based on the Star-2.4 satellite bus. It is equipped with 24 C-band, and 24 Ku-band transponders, and at launch it had a mass of 2,561 kg (5,646 lb). It has a design life of fifteen years, however it was launched with enough fuel to operate for at least sixteen years, if its systems are still functional.[1]

Launch

The launch of SES-1 was conducted by International Launch Services (ILS), using a Proton-M launch vehicle with a Briz-M upper stage.[3] The launch occurred from Site 200/39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, at 11:19:00 UTC on 24 April 2010.[2] The launch successfully placed SES-1 into a subsynchronous orbit close to geostationary altitude.[3][4]

Mission

In May and June 2010, SES-1 was positioned close to 131° West to temporarily provide backup to the AMC-11 satellite in the event that AMC-11 could not continue broadcasting whilst it is moved out of the way of the failed Galaxy 15 satellite, which passed close to it at the end of May 2010.[5] In the end, services provided by AMC-11 were not interrupted.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter (11 December 2017). "SES 1, 2, 3". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 11 April 2021.
  2. ^ a b McDowell, Jonathan (14 March 2021). "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Report. Retrieved 11 April 2021.
  3. ^ a b c "SES-1 Mission Overview" (PDF). International Launch Services. Retrieved 21 May 2010.
  4. ^ Bergin, Chris (24 April 2010). "ILS Proton-M successfully launches with Orbital-built SES-1 satellite". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 21 May 2010.
  5. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (17 May 2010). "SES Details Plan To Avert Interference by Failed Intelsat Craft". SpaceNews. Retrieved 21 May 2010.
  6. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (3 June 2010). "Intelsat, SES Safely Negotiate Passage of Wayward Craft". SpaceNews. Archived from the original on 7 June 2010. Retrieved 7 June 2010. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
This page was last edited on 11 April 2021, at 22:18
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.