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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Phantom Ranch is a lodge inside Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. It is on the north side of the Colorado River near its confluence with Bright Angel Creek and Phantom Creek. Built in 1922, Phantom Ranch is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.[1]

The Phantom Ranch Canteen
The Phantom Ranch Canteen

YouTube Encyclopedic

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Transcription

This is the heart of Grand Canyon. It’s like an onion and the layers are coming off as you are hiking into the canyon By the time you get to Phantom, I'm just joyful. You really get how special life is and sacred this canyon is. Phantom Ranch is located at the bottom of Grand Canyon along the Colorado River. It’s the trail junction where the three main corridor trails - we call them - meet. The South Kaibab, the Bright Angel, and the North Kaibab trails. Millions of people visit the rims every year, but only about one percent of our visitors stay overnight here at Phantom Ranch. Typically, people when they come to West, perhaps want to climb to the top of a mountain. Well here at Grand Canyon it’s the reverse, they want to reach the bottom. In fact, I like to tell people when they ask about my career, and my journey down here, that I have made my way down the ladder to arrive at Phantom Ranch. and in a way it’s the same thing with our visitors. For them to come to the bottom is the experience that they are looking for. It is water - more than anything else - that has drawn people to this specific location for the last thousand or twelve hundred years or so. The Fred Harvey Company and Mary Colter designed the cabins - Phantom Ranch in 1922. Colter designed her cabins to blend in. She wanted this place to speak for itself. I think that Phantom is her crown jewel at the Grand Canyon and maybe even in the Southwest. Mary Jane Colter is such a big part of Phantom Ranch. You could say she is on the staff. Colter built these cabins and started to draw a new kind of audience into the bottom of Grand Canyon. The wealthiest of the tourists: authors, artists, oil and steel magnates. People that could afford a trip to travel by train from the East Coast, then to ride the mules to the bottom of Grand Canyon and stay for multiple weeks on end down here. And in the 1930’s President Franklin Roosevelt formed what is called the Civilian Conservation Corps. Camp 818 worked here at Phantom Ranch, improving trails and campgrounds and providing an experience for hikers that we still have today. Hikers, backpackers, mule riders experience this place not a whole lot different than some of our earliest tour operators did. To arrive at Phantom Ranch there are really only three ways down here. On their own two feet. Ride one of the rafts. People can ride a mule down so ride on someone else’s feet instead. And the mule ride is no easier than the hike. Mule riders when they arrive here are just as tired and sore and the hikers are. Badley: Hi folks, welcome to Phantom Ranch! Mules have always been a tradition at Phantom and we could not exist without them. Almost everything that comes in and out of Phantom, comes in by mule, goes out by mule. Our postcards are stamped with a unique ‘mailed by mule from the bottom of the Grand Canyon at Phantom Ranch’ sticker. Yeah, it’s never gotten old. The art of postcard writing is alive and well down here. Many people are drawn to Phantom Ranch because of the comforts that are down here. This is a great place for an introductory backpacking experience. This isn’t as rustic as it once was but for many people today it is the first time they have ever had a backpacking or backcountry experience. So often here at Grand Canyon hikers have the tendency to overestimate their abilities and underestimate Grand Canyon. We cannot stress enough the idea of hiking smart in the summer. Hike smart means start early on your hike or start late. Avoid the heat of the day. Take advantage of water when you find it. And you will have a much nicer hike. It will treat you the way you treat it. If you treat the canyon with respect the canyon will respect you right back. If you disrespect it, it will kick you right in the butt. The canyon doesn't like to be harmed I mean, its alive. It’s a breathing organism. Every day at the ranch it's a new experience it’s a new adventure - for the people that come and for us the ranchers. We take care of the people that come here and the people that come here are very special people. Phantom Ranch is so special to me because of the people that come down here: the backpackers, the mule riders, the staff that works down here. There’s definitely a connection with people in the canyon. A lot of walls just immediately go down. At Phantom, it really doesn't get better than this and this is really, really good. While we're having this experience at Phantom Ranch, we forget about what goes on everywhere else. We don’t have cell phones to connect us or the Internet. What we have to connect us though, is the past. All those people that came before us, we’re sort of in a way following in their footsteps and continuing their legacy too. We want the next people who come down here to have an enjoyable experience just like we're having right now.

Contents

History

The site where the ranch is now was used by Native Americans; pit houses and a ceremonial kiva dating from about 1050 have been found there. The earliest recorded visit by non-Native Americans took place in 1869, when John Wesley Powell and his company camped at its beach. Prospectors began working the area in the 1890s, using mules to haul their ore. At the turn of the 20th century, the founders of the Grand Canyon Transportation Company began a project to exploit its tourism potential, hiring a crew to improve the trail from Phantom Ranch to the Canyon's North Rim. President Theodore Roosevelt traveled down the canyon to the camp during a hunting expedition in 1913; in honor of this visit, the site became known as Roosevelt Camp.

Roosevelt's enthusiasm for the Grand Canyon helped lead to its incorporation into the National Park System in 1919. The Fred Harvey Company was granted the concession for the camp in 1922; the company hired the American architect Mary Colter to design permanent lodging. Colter suggested that its name be changed to Phantom Ranch.[2] Construction presented a major challenge: all the building materials except rock had to be hauled down by mules. Meeting the challenges at this and other national parks led to the architectural style known as National Park Service Rustic, which features native stone, rough-hewn wood, large-scale design elements, and intensive use of hand labor.

During the Great Depression in the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps made a number of improvements to the ranch and its access trails. The 1920s and 1930s saw its popularity grow, and it was visited by many wealthy and notable guests. The Fred Harvey company made it a point to hire young, attractive, well-educated, and adventurous women to staff the resort.

As the Grand Canyon's popularity grew, so did Phantom Ranch's; during Easter weekend in 1964, about 1,000 people appeared with the intention of spending the night there. The National Park Service then instituted a permit system for overnight stays at the ranch.

Phantom Ranch in the 21st century

The ranch remains a popular destination; its accommodations are often sold out on the first day they become available, which was 13 months beforehand in 2017. Beginning in 2019, reservations will be issued monthly via a lottery system. [3][4]

The site includes cabins, two dormitories each for men and women, a restaurant (serving only people who book ahead of time), a mule corral, emergency medical facilities, a ranger station, the Bright Angel Campground, a beach frequently visited by Colorado River rafters, and a heliport. Cottonwood trees line the creeks and shade the buildings. The Bright Angel Campground, approximately 1/2 mile from Phantom Ranch, has 32 campsites, including two large group sites. The only modes of access to the ranch are foot trails (also used by mules) and the Colorado River. The North Kaibab Trail leads 14 miles to the North Rim. The 9.3-mile trail to the South Rim follows the River Trail for two miles and then climbs the Bright Angel Trail to Grand Canyon Village. The two trail bridges near the ranch (Silver Bridge and Black Bridge) are the only Colorado River crossings within a several-hundred-mile span.[5]

Phantom Ranch has no official mail service (unlike Supai, Arizona[6]), but concessionaires have traditionally transported letters and postcards by mule. Packages are excluded from this service.[7][8]

Cabins at Phantom Ranch
Cabins at Phantom Ranch

Geography

Phantom Ranch's elevation is 2,460 feet (750 m); that is about 4,800 feet (1,500 m) lower than the South Rim and about 5,800 feet (1,800 m) lower than the North Rim. The average daily high and low temperatures are 106 °F (41 °C)/78 °C (172 °F) during July and 56 °F (13 °C)/36 °F (2 °C) in January. This represents a wide differential from temperatures at the top of the Grand Canyon; at the South Rim, the average daily high and low temperatures are 84 °F (29 °C)/54 °F (12 °C) in July and 41 °F (5 °C)/18 °F (−8 °C) in January. The South Rim averages 58 inches (150 cm) of snow, and Phantom Ranch less than 1 inch (2.5 cm). The riparian zone at the ranch is subject to invasion by non-native species such as tamarix, and volunteers are at times invited to help maintain the original biome by removing them.

The ranch is located at 36°06′18″N 112°05′40″W / 36.10500°N 112.09444°W / 36.10500; -112.09444.

Climate data for Phanton Ranch
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 73
(23)
91
(33)
93
(34)
106
(41)
111
(44)
119
(48)
120
(49)
120
(49)
114
(46)
103
(39)
87
(31)
77
(25)
120
(49)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 66.7
(19.3)
75.0
(23.9)
85.1
(29.5)
95.0
(35)
103.9
(39.9)
111.9
(44.4)
114.2
(45.7)
111.2
(44)
105.5
(40.8)
95.5
(35.3)
79.6
(26.4)
67.3
(19.6)
115.2
(46.2)
Average high °F (°C) 56.8
(13.8)
63.5
(17.5)
72.6
(22.6)
81.8
(27.7)
92.2
(33.4)
102.7
(39.3)
105.7
(40.9)
102.5
(39.2)
95.6
(35.3)
82.7
(28.2)
67.9
(19.9)
56.6
(13.7)
81.7
(27.6)
Average low °F (°C) 36.7
(2.6)
41.1
(5.1)
47.1
(8.4)
54.2
(12.3)
62.9
(17.2)
71.5
(21.9)
76.6
(24.8)
74.3
(23.5)
68.2
(20.1)
57.2
(14)
45.6
(7.6)
37.5
(3.1)
56.1
(13.4)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 28.7
(−1.8)
32.1
(0.1)
36.3
(2.4)
42.9
(6.1)
50.5
(10.3)
61.3
(16.3)
68.8
(20.4)
66.6
(19.2)
59.0
(15)
46.8
(8.2)
35.12
(1.73)
29.4
(−1.4)
26.8
(−2.9)
Record low °F (°C) 14
(−10)
21
(−6)
25
(−4)
27
(−3)
32
(0)
50
(10)
60
(16)
58
(14)
48
(9)
39
(4)
25
(−4)
12
(−11)
12
(−11)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.03
(26.2)
0.94
(23.9)
0.87
(22.1)
0.49
(12.4)
0.34
(8.6)
0.20
(5.1)
1.00
(25.4)
1.35
(34.3)
0.96
(24.4)
0.94
(23.9)
0.78
(19.8)
0.81
(20.6)
9.71
(246.6)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.1
(0.3)
0.1
(0.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.1
(0.3)
0.3
(0.8)
Source: [9]

References

  1. ^ "Phantom Ranch, a Historic Hotels of America member". Historic Hotels of America. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  2. ^ Berke, Arnold: "Mary Colter: Architect of the Southwest", page 118. Princeton Architectural Press, 2002. 156898345X
  3. ^ Lodges, Grand Canyon National Park. "Phantom Ranch Lottery - Grand Canyon National Park Lodges". Grandcanyonlodges.com. Retrieved 1 August 2017. 
  4. ^ Shane Christensen (1 February 2012). Frommer's Grand Canyon National Park. John Wiley & Sons. p. 110. ISBN 978-1-118-23819-6. 
  5. ^ "Silver Bridge". Arizona State University. Retrieved 2014-10-05. 
  6. ^ United States Postal Service. "History of the United States Postal Service 1775-1993". USPS. Archived from the original on 2006-08-22. Retrieved 2006-08-26. 
  7. ^ "No more care packages for Phantom Ranch". Arizona Daily Sun. 2013. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 
  8. ^ "Package Delivery to Phantom Ranch Discontinued". River Runners For Wilderness. 2012. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 
  9. ^ "PHANTOM RCH, ARIZONA (026471)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved March 26, 2018. 

Further reading

Thybony, Scott (2001). Phantom Ranch. Grand Canyon, AZ: Grand Canyon Assn. ISBN 978-0-938216-76-6.  – This 32-page book reveals the ranch's history and the people who made that history. Also touches on the flora and fauna of Grand Canyon. The author is an archeologist and former river guide.

External links

This page was last edited on 4 April 2018, at 05:55
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