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Kenneth A. Roberts

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kenneth A. Roberts
Kenneth A. Roberts.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's at-large district
In office
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1965
Preceded byDistrict inactive
Succeeded byDistrict inactive
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's 4th district
In office
January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1963
Preceded bySam Hobbs
Succeeded byArthur Andrews
Personal details
Born
Kenneth Allison Roberts

(1912-11-01)November 1, 1912
Piedmont, Alabama
DiedMay 9, 1989(1989-05-09) (aged 76)
Potomac, Maryland
Political partyDemocratic
ResidenceAnniston, Alabama
Alma materHoward College
University of Alabama Law School
OccupationPolitician

Kenneth Allison Roberts (November 1, 1912 – May 9, 1989) was a U.S. Representative from Alabama.

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Transcription

Contents

Biography

Born in Piedmont, Alabama, Roberts attended the public schools and Howard College, Birmingham, Alabama. He was graduated from the University of Alabama Law School in 1935 and admitted to the bar in 1936. He practiced law in Anniston, Alabama (1936) and in Talladega (1937–1942).

Roberts was elected to the Alabama State Senate in 1942 and resigned the same year to enter the United States Navy. He served in both Atlantic and Pacific Theaters until discharged as a lieutenant in 1945. He was president of Piedmont Development Co. from 1945 to 1950. From 1948 to 1950 he served as member of Alabama State Board of Veterans Affairs and city attorney of Piedmont, Alabama.

Roberts was elected as a Democrat to the Eighty-second and to the six succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1965). He was wounded in the 1954 U.S. Capitol shooting incident. Having been a signatory to the 1956 Southern Manifesto that opposed the desegregation of public schools ordered by the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education, he voted against H.R. 6127, Civil Rights Act of 1957.[1] He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1964 to the Eighty-ninth Congress.

Roberts led the establishment of federal safety legislation through the House of Representatives subcommittee on traffic safety which was formed in 1956.[2]

In 1963 he introduced the U.S. Clean Air Act.

He resumed the practice of law until his retirement in 1979. From 1965 to 1972 he was Counsel for the Vehicle Equipment Safety Commission. He served as member of the National Highway Safety Advisory Committee from 1966 to 1970.

He was a resident of Anniston, Alabama until his death due to congestive heart failure in Potomac, Maryland, on May 9, 1989. He was interred in Arlington National Cemetery.

See also

Bibliography

  • United States Congress. "Kenneth A. Roberts (id: R000314)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  • Heflin, Howell (June 21, 1989). "Tribute to Congressman Kenneth Roberts". Congressional Record - 101st Congress (1989-1990). Library of Congress.

References

  1. ^ http://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/85-1957/h42
  2. ^ Luger, Stan (2005). Corporate power, American democracy, and the automobile industry (reprint. ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 64. ISBN 0521023610.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Sam Hobbs
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's 4th congressional district

1951–1963
Succeeded by
Arthur Andrews
Preceded by
district inactive
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's at-large congressional district

1963–1965
Succeeded by
district inactive

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

This page was last edited on 15 May 2019, at 15:21
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